Looking for a new mic for vocals

gecko zzed

Grumpy Mod
I also beg to differ about the praising of the NT1. In my opinion it has the most horrible sounding top end of any mics out the - no matter price. I have no clue as to why that mic has become so popular.

There are two versions. The original NT1 was the one that was regarded as being too bright. Since then it has been seriously re-engineered, and the new black NT1 is a very smooth and versatile. That's why it (not the roginal) has become so popular.
 

LazerBeakShiek

Active member
My best mic for my vocals It’s the MXL 4000.

MXL are great for harvesting parts. Screens and bodies..

Watch out for advertising too.

According to Behringer "The C-1 microphone is a home recording enthusiast’s dream come true!"

and,

"The C-1 just may be the only microphone your studio will need."

Not buying it. I fell for it on the NT-1a. It just never sounded like anything. I tried all kinds of off axis acoustic tricks up and down the body. Its not my favorite. For sure. The AKG P420 is a much better entry level LDC. The 420 on figure 8 is ok.

Only microphone you need.Yeah right..So how big are y'all's mic locker?

I got 5 now.

One cool thing about the variety is discovering new usage. Pod casting or Zoom meeting done with a omni really adds a nice touch to the conference. Omni for podcasting, for a newsroom voice effect. Never off the mic. Even.
 
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homestudioguy

Well-known member
The current sE Electronics SE2200 comes with an integrated shock mount windscreen/pop filter , is $299 US and is a much better mic than the NT-1 or NT1a. Rode has been making some great mics since they opened up for business, however, IMHO, the NT-1 is not one of them, at least for me. I've owned both the 797 Studio Projects C-1 and C-3 and at that time and available budget, they were perfect but there are better less high frequency aggressive mics these days.
 

gecko zzed

Grumpy Mod
The current sE Electronics SE2200 comes with an integrated shock mount windscreen/pop filter , is $299 US and is a much better mic than the NT-1 or NT1a. Rode has been making some great mics since they opened up for business, however, IMHO, the NT-1 is not one of them, at least for me. I've owned both the 797 Studio Projects C-1 and C-3 and at that time and available budget, they were perfect but there are better less high frequency aggressive mics these days.

Which NT1 are you referring to? The old or the new?
 

homestudioguy

Well-known member
Original and 1a. 1a worse than original. I compared the original NT-1 to a CAD Large Diaphram Dynamic back when they were both introduced to the market and the NT 1 was like nails on a chalkboard. I ended up buying the original Rode NT-2.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Original and 1a. 1a worse than original. I compared the original NT-1 to a CAD Large Diaphram Dynamic back when they were both introduced to the market and the NT 1 was like nails on a chalkboard. I ended up buying the original Rode NT-2.

This is the reason that Rode should have renamed the NT-1. After it was revamped to the current black version some 6 years ago, it is quieter and considerably smoother in the upper range. The current NT-1 is not the same as the original by a long shot. I have a pair of SP's B3s, and I prefer the current NT1 for my vocal work.
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
Microphones are what they are. Sometimes they work for a particular situation. I find it tough to give mic advice without proof of the put in.

This video link I am posting I recorded with a Shure SM7b for vocals through a Neve clone X73i preamp. Rode NT1a through the Vintech (hole) and Shure KSM141 through interface pre (neck) on guitars. The following video for 'Thursday' is also the same setup.

LINK

LINK2
 

gecko zzed

Grumpy Mod
This is the reason that Rode should have renamed the NT-1. After it was revamped to the current black version some 6 years ago, it is quieter and considerably smoother in the upper range. The current NT-1 is not the same as the original by a long shot. I have a pair of SP's B3s, and I prefer the current NT1 for my vocal work.

I'm not sure why Rode chose to stay with NT1 instead of going to NT1B or some other way of distinguishing old from new. As it is, we'll get what we see now: people bagging the NT1 because of their experience with the old and not realising the new is quite different, and consequently putting off potential buyers who likewise are an aware of two versions.
 

tmix

Well-known member
my thoughts as well

Rob,

In regards to the SM7b.

I have to TOTALLY agree with you.
Due to all the hype I bought one 15 years ago and tried to use it... but is was ONLY useful to me in one one tracking session where I had a REALLY loud singer that it was a great match for and the energy of the singer bought some life to the Mic, and the MIC kept my pre from overloading.

I just sold it.. and could not be happier.

If you have a loud voice... and I mean... A LOUD VOICE... they are ok.
My opinion obviously...

I have a pretty deep mic locker and I feel the NT1 (new black one ) was a decent all "rounder" enough so that I bought 3.

obviously if you have the opportunity to try out a mic before buying you should.
If anyone is any where close to Mansfield Texas... just give me a shout if you need to try stuff out...LOL
 

homestudioguy

Well-known member
Telefunken m82

I bought the Telefunken M82 Front End Address Dynamic ($399) and their big M100 ($100) shockmount a few years ago instead of buying an SM7b. Bought it primarily as a horn mic. The M82 doesnt seem to need all the mic pre gain required by the SM7b. In fact, Last time I used it for trombone, it was LOUD! Used it for a Vocal earlier this year and it was loud and clear ie pretty much in your face. It has 4 available settings and takes eq quite well, IMO. Not sure if T-Funk still makes them anymore but they are still being sold.
Telefunken Elektroakustik M82 Broadcast Package | FrontEndAudio.com
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
See, it is just ones personal experience in your personal room with your personal gear and the source you are recording. Microphones are what you get from them and how you use them in your environment.

I really want to argue with my previous posted videos that a SM7b is not just for 'really loud' singers, but I would just be wasting my time again. Why? Because nobody seems to take the time to listen. And that's fine too, because in the end A+B in C doesn't work for everyone because everyone's ABC's are not the same ever.

There is no ability to tell someone what is best, because it is only an opinion that may not be the same for everyone in their particular situation.

Buy a mic. Try it. If you don't like it, then sell it. Buy something else... Rinse and repeat...

I have purchased a few mics based on a members opinion. That was from moresound that used to frequent the forums here. He actually loaned me a pair of $2800 boutique mics and sent them from DC so I could try. In the end, I bought a couple of KSM141's from him that were similar in sound. Even he couldn't tell me what would work for me. But he gave options for me to try. Miss him around here...
 

CrowsofFritz

Flamingo!
See, it is just ones personal experience in your personal room with your personal gear and the source you are recording. Microphones are what you get from them and how you use them in your environment.

I really want to argue with my previous posted videos that a SM7b is not just for 'really loud' singers, but I would just be wasting my time again. Why? Because nobody seems to take the time to listen. And that's fine too, because in the end A+B in C doesn't work for everyone because everyone's ABC's are not the same ever.

There is no ability to tell someone what is best, because it is only an opinion that may not be the same for everyone in their particular situation.

Buy a mic. Try it. If you don't like it, then sell it. Buy something else... Rinse and repeat...

I have purchased a few mics based on a members opinion. That was from moresound that used to frequent the forums here. He actually loaned me a pair of $2800 boutique mics and sent them from DC so I could try. In the end, I bought a couple of KSM141's from him that were similar in sound. Even he couldn't tell me what would work for me. But he gave options for me to try. Miss him around here...

Yeah, what works for one voice may not work for another. My MXL may have too much air if it were recording a female’s voice. But with my voice it sounds fantastic.
 

dustywake

New member
Mojave MA-50 and Audio Test Kitchen

Hey there,

thanks in advance for your advice and help.

I'm in search of a new microphone, due to the pandemic I can't visit a music store to test some mics and get advice on-site though. I am willing to spend up to 400€ for a mic,
that being said more expensive obviously isn't always better, as it has to fit the voice/needs. I'm open to suggestions.

My room isn't what you would call "well treated" but it's loaded with stuff, no free walls either, so I assume the acoustics aren't horrible at least, but by no means optimal.

I am generally open to both condenser mics as well as dynamic mics, whatever gets the job done best.
I'd use the mic almost entirely for vocals. I mostly do singer/songwriter stuff if that's helpful information.

Some friends already suggested a few microphones, the Rode NT1, the Lewitt LCT 440 Pure, as well as the
Shure SM7B, but would any of those fit my voice? (I'm not at all trained to figure that one out.) Would you go for another option? Would you rather go
for a dynamic mic like the Shure over a condenser in a non treated room/homestudio?

I'm well aware that finding the perfect match this way is (nigh) impossible, but I'd really appreciate
your advice and input. I am a male singer and I'll add some recordings so you can hear my voice.
The recordings provided are not done in my room.

If necessary and helpful, I can provide more and different recordings, specific to what you'd need to hear, cause I have no idea what would work best for you.

Thank you in advance, stay safe & healthy!

Hey there Divisigns,

Here's a resource for you to check out: Audio Test Kitchen Audio Test Kitchen | Compare the gear. Trust your ears.
You can hear over 300 microphones.
While you're there, check out our MA-50!

Happy Mic Hunting!
Dusty
Mojave Audio
 
My best mic for my vocals is one that is anything but neutral. Really weird frequency response. It’s the MXL 4000.

Well, that is not the case here. Among a bunch of other mics I have the Blue Bottle kit with all available capsules - and also a custom made CT-12 (Tim Campbell). And even though I usually will start out with one of 2-3 capsules, I tend to try with all capsules - and the experience just tells me, that I can record four songs, with MY own voice, and find four different capsules suitable for the four tracks separately. The one that works wonders on one song, will be useless on another - and vice versa.

I am a firm believer the following terms should be erased from existence; "Best microphone for this and that voice", "Best microphone for soprano/barytone/etc. voice" and so forth... It has been said OVER and OVER and OVER again. Everyone can give their opinion - no one but you will know yours.
There are some things that will most likely work on some things (like a Royer R121 on a guitar cab) and some mics that will usually yield a good result (like an U87 on vocals) - but not always. Sometimes a U87 will enhance unwanted frequencies in the room, the timbre of the voice in that particular track, or just make the vocal performance unable to sit comfortably in the particular mix. Sometimes a SM57 will do a better job in that application. Or an SM7B, or an M49b, or a C12, or the crappy mic in your handheld cassette tape recorder - or a NT1a(black - whatever)... I just have to say, about the latter mentioned Røde mic, it has not happened to me. I have a couple of mics I do believe will NEVER get a position in anything I do. NT1 is one of these mics, and probably the worst on the list too, along with AKG C1000, AKG C3000 and sE Z5600.

I do believe, that if you do multitrack recordings - say vocals, backing vocals, acoustic guitars, percussion, and whatnot - and only have one microphone to perform the task - you will get the most neutral and workable result with any linear microphone that, most important of all, delivers a realistic transient response. Get as good info "on tape" as even possible, would be my mantra. Colouration is good, but it is just so difficult to remove colouration once it's added "on tape" - and very easy to add come the mix process.
Another thing with mics that add colouration in form of distortion and uneven frequency response is, that all the tracks will have the same bumps and grinds, since it has been recorded through the same microphone. It's like if you're a painter. It is so much easier to see what you do, if you are wearing non-coloured glasses as opposed to green glasses.
Bottom line to the OP is, that I do find coloured mics to be good for a lot of things, but if you have a limited amount of mics, I really suggest you use the least colouring mics available to you.
 
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