Post Your Analog Recordings Here...

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Here's a guitar instrumental cover of Yngwie Malmsteen's "I am a Viking" done on the Tascam TSR-8 1/2" 8-track. All percussion was generated in the computer, then printed to tape before any tracking. All bass, guitars and keys were tracked live to tape. Mixed in the DAW.

I Am A Viking
Your playing is just awsome Brav πŸ€˜πŸ˜πŸ‘. I do a bit of Eddie and Vai and Alex Lifeson but yours is way beyond my technical capability.
Brilliant 😍 I am gonna practice now and try to raise my game.
Sounds like you used a lot of different modes and chordal substitution. I have always tried to get my head around the theory and want to get better, but I am lazy, its hard bloody work!
Respect mate πŸ˜πŸ‘
Smithers
 

Bravin Neff

New member
Your playing is just awsome Brav πŸ€˜πŸ˜πŸ‘. I do a bit of Eddie and Vai and Alex Lifeson but yours is way beyond my technical capability.
Brilliant 😍 I am gonna practice now and try to raise my game.
Sounds like you used a lot of different modes and chordal substitution. I have always tried to get my head around the theory and want to get better, but I am lazy, its hard bloody work!
Respect mate πŸ˜πŸ‘
Smithers

Thank you! The funny thing is, I used to play that song effortlessly as a kid, 30 years ago. Now I find it much harder. Part of the appeal to me of recording on analog is the pain process (LOL), you know, forcing myself to get it right. No edits allowed. As much as I'd like to say recording that song was straightforward, it was actually quite difficult. By the time I got to the solo, which was the very end, I was so sick of the song I just starting phoning it in, and frankly accepted performances I don't care for. But I was more than ready to move on.
 

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Thank you! The funny thing is, I used to play that song effortlessly as a kid, 30 years ago. Now I find it much harder. Part of the appeal to me of recording on analog is the pain process (LOL), you know, forcing myself to get it right. No edits allowed. As much as I'd like to say recording that song was straightforward, it was actually quite difficult. By the time I got to the solo, which was the very end, I was so sick of the song I just starting phoning it in, and frankly accepted performances I don't care for. But I was more than ready to move on.
You know Brav ? (dont want to come over all Yoda here πŸ˜…) but I think it is all about putting some of your own creativity into whatever music you do. I speak as an ageing rocker who loves all musical styles. You have "knock it out of the park" guitar ability.
I read an interview with Satch from many years ago where he said....
... I was practicing so hard and getting ever faster and more technical, then a friend of mine gave me an album.... The Joshua Tree by U2... I could not believe how this basic technically inept guitar player created such beautiful music with a few simple notes and an old analogue echo box.... it really made me re evaluate what I was doing on guitar and composition.
πŸ₯°πŸ˜‰πŸ‘
 

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Sorry I think I might have posted this in the wrong section but I will try again. A little college demo done with an Atari and a basic Korg X5 synth and an analogue 4 track recorder and one old SM58 30 years ago.
Mark, I listen to this now and it is awful. But I did ok with the limited stuff I had. I programmed the drums quite well I think.. I have always been a frustrated drummer. But the sound was a total horrible bag of hammers, I have much better drum module these days and hoping to remix with the original Cubase data. The bass line was punchy but just got lost in the mix. I mixed the synth sounds way to high. I am pleased with the guitar mix between raunch and clean. I liked the raunch under the level of the clean strat sound with chorus and the way that came out. But the solo sound was truly dreadful, horrible weedy middly crap. But by the time I came to recording the twin lead I was very drunk. I got away with it but the guitar solo parts are very wobbly and out of time. I hope to re record now with all of the better equipment I have now but keeping the original Atari Cubase 3 data I have to run the backing track with some tweaks and add a lead and some backing vocal tracks along with other stuff I am working on now.
Thanks mate πŸ₯°πŸ˜‰πŸ‘
 

Bravin Neff

New member
You know Brav ? (dont want to come over all Yoda here πŸ˜…) but I think it is all about putting some of your own creativity into whatever music you do. I speak as an ageing rocker who loves all musical styles. You have "knock it out of the park" guitar ability.
I read an interview with Satch from many years ago where he said....
... I was practicing so hard and getting ever faster and more technical, then a friend of mine gave me an album.... The Joshua Tree by U2... I could not believe how this basic technically inept guitar player created such beautiful music with a few simple notes and an old analogue echo box.... it really made me re evaluate what I was doing on guitar and composition.
πŸ₯°πŸ˜‰πŸ‘
Oh you don't need to tell me. I was a shred kid in the late 80s and early 90s, but this Yngwie cover is me revisiting that stuff after basically not listening to any of it for decades. I'm all about funk and soul and groove these days. And yes, I love the Joshua Tree.
 
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jpmorris

Tape Wolf
People who were there may snigger, but I have long this weird fixation with 1973 like it was some kind of utopian golden age that I unfortunately missed. So I wrote a song about that.

Tracking was done on an Otari MX80 24-track, with the vocals and bass tracked on a TASCAM TSR-8 first and transferred later. The backwards bass part was done by flipping over the tape on the TSR-8. Mixing was done to a Studer A807 and about 4 tape splices were used to edit the mix together. Mixing desk was my trusty A&H GL2400-24.
 

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Smithers XKR

Well-known member
People who were there may snigger, but I have long this weird fixation with 1973 like it was some kind of utopian golden age that I unfortunately missed. So I wrote a song about that.

Tracking was done on an Otari MX80 24-track, with the vocals and bass tracked on a TASCAM TSR-8 first and transferred later. The backwards bass part was done by flipping over the tape on the TSR-8. Mixing was done to a Studer A807 and about 4 tape splices were used to edit the mix together.
This is completely awsome man!!!

Sounds like a cross between Jon Lord and Rod Argent !!!
You are the man πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°
 

jpmorris

Tape Wolf
This is completely awsome man!!!

Sounds like a cross between Jon Lord and Rod Argent !!!
You are the man πŸ₯°πŸ₯°πŸ₯°
Thanks! Full disclosure, most of the instruments were sequenced on computer, with the timecode track on tape to keep them locked together during tracking. The bass was tracked on the TSR-8 because it has auto punch-in which is useful for fixing my mistakes, and the key-mashing on the Hammond SK1 was done as live overdubs. If I could play keys that well I'd probably not be writing software for a living.

EDIT: Instruments used included, Hammond SK-1, Hammond XM-1, Roland M-VS1, Roland JV-1010, Alesis DM10, Moog Voyager and Manikin Memotron, plus a Steinberger XT2 bass. Delay on the vocals was done using a Watkins copicat, the Voyager has its own ECS-4 disc echo. The plate reverb on the mixer bus was a Strymon bluesky pedal, and a Strymon Deco was used for flanging the vocals on the chorus.
 

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Thanks! Full disclosure, most of the instruments were sequenced on computer, with the timecode track on tape to keep them locked together during tracking. The bass was tracked on the TSR-8 because it has auto punch-in which is useful for fixing my mistakes, and the key-mashing on the Hammond SK1 was done as live overdubs. If I could play keys that well I'd probably not be writing software for a living.

EDIT: Instruments used included, Hammond SK-1, Hammond XM-1, Roland M-VS1, Roland JV-1010, Alesis DM10, Moog Voyager and Manikin Memotron, plus a Steinberger XT2 bass. Delay on the vocals was done using a Watkins copicat, the Voyager has its own ECS-4 disc echo. The plate reverb on the mixer bus was a Strymon bluesky pedal, and a Strymon Deco was used for flanging the vocals on the chorus.
We all need a bit of quantising mate. I am a guitar player who play a bit of keys as well, I sequenced the drums, played bass and keys then fixed the keyboard mistakes then added the guitar parts.
Done in the early 90s on an Atari as sort of a rubbish Bon Jovi tribute. Still got the vocal to do, but on my list
We should collaborate some time?
I have loads of little songs and ideas half recorded of all genres that I want to complete.
 

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Thanks! Full disclosure, most of the instruments were sequenced on computer, with the timecode track on tape to keep them locked together during tracking. The bass was tracked on the TSR-8 because it has auto punch-in which is useful for fixing my mistakes, and the key-mashing on the Hammond SK1 was done as live overdubs. If I could play keys that well I'd probably not be writing software for a living.

EDIT: Instruments used included, Hammond SK-1, Hammond XM-1, Roland M-VS1, Roland JV-1010, Alesis DM10, Moog Voyager and Manikin Memotron, plus a Steinberger XT2 bass. Delay on the vocals was done using a Watkins copicat, the Voyager has its own ECS-4 disc echo. The plate reverb on the mixer bus was a Strymon bluesky pedal, and a Strymon Deco was used for flanging the vocals on the chorus.
 

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  • Where Angels Fear To Tread.mp3
    5.4 MB

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Thanks! Full disclosure, most of the instruments were sequenced on computer, with the timecode track on tape to keep them locked together during tracking. The bass was tracked on the TSR-8 because it has auto punch-in which is useful for fixing my mistakes, and the key-mashing on the Hammond SK1 was done as live overdubs. If I could play keys that well I'd probably not be writing software for a living.

EDIT: Instruments used included, Hammond SK-1, Hammond XM-1, Roland M-VS1, Roland JV-1010, Alesis DM10, Moog Voyager and Manikin Memotron, plus a Steinberger XT2 bass. Delay on the vocals was done using a Watkins copicat, the Voyager has its own ECS-4 disc echo. The plate reverb on the mixer bus was a Strymon bluesky pedal, and a Strymon Deco was used for flanging the vocals on the chorus.
Its great stuff, I love the Jon Lord Hammond through the overdriven Marshall stack sound. I have a lovely rack mount Roland Super JV1000 rack module with all of the plug ins and also a vintage Korg X5 keyboard in my set up. The Korg Organ sounds are great but quite clean.
That Hammond through a blazing Marshall sound is really difficult to achieve πŸ€˜πŸ€˜πŸ€˜πŸ‘πŸ‘
 

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
Thanks! Full disclosure, most of the instruments were sequenced on computer, with the timecode track on tape to keep them locked together during tracking. The bass was tracked on the TSR-8 because it has auto punch-in which is useful for fixing my mistakes, and the key-mashing on the Hammond SK1 was done as live overdubs. If I could play keys that well I'd probably not be writing software for a living.

EDIT: Instruments used included, Hammond SK-1, Hammond XM-1, Roland M-VS1, Roland JV-1010, Alesis DM10, Moog Voyager and Manikin Memotron, plus a Steinberger XT2 bass. Delay on the vocals was done using a Watkins copicat, the Voyager has its own ECS-4 disc echo. The plate reverb on the mixer bus was a Strymon bluesky pedal, and a Strymon Deco was used for flanging the vocals on the chorus.
Sort of tracks I am trying to write now are more in an LA 6/8 type of groove. Kinda Toto and Steely Dan and Michael McDonald type of thing, more laid back with more jazz pop and a bit of latin Santana influence thrown in there. Trying to draw back from the rock/metal genre and want to get sequencing more subtle drum patterns. I am really into drum and bass programming. Early Doobie Bros and Moby Grape with the 2 kits and Santana with the percussion etc πŸ˜‰πŸ‘
 

jdragonash

New member
Seeing as we've been talking about this, and seeing as I've just stumbled out of another Lonely Few live to two track recording session here is one of the results.

Fast Food - a song about how the industry has our best interests at heart...

Recorded via the Studer 089 to the Revox PR99 two track 1/4" with all of us in the same room with no effects or compressors using a bunch of old mikes including an AKG C414B-ULS, AKG D190, AKG D112, EV RE10, EV RE11, EV PL6 (x2) EV RE200 and a Sennheiser e606. No di's or AD conversions during recording as usual. Oh, and a megaphone.

Mastered (if you can call it that) to the Nagra 1/4" full track mono recorder through a few bits of outboard and digitized to a 320 kb mp3 via a 48kHz/24 bit .BWF made on the Fostex CR500 master recorder from the Nagra's playback head as it was being mastered...

http://www.mp3.com.au/Forms/MediaView.aspx?MediaId=137080

With a bit of luck, we might get this thread as a sticky?

G

Thanks for post. Here are a couple songs I did with my old crew, recorded on Ampex AG440, everything live except the vocals.

 
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rob aylestone

Well-known member
This goes back to 1995, and was a live radio broadcast I did - mixed live, straight to a reel to reel at 15ips - this is that tape dubbed to DAT. The only actual analague recording I have I think. There is a sort of rawness to it, but looking back - at best there would have been just 4 compressors and two reverbs.
 

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  • Coastal Radio Live broadcast-cut.mp3
    10.4 MB

jdragonash

New member
Not sure if you're referring to yours or mine. Your link works. Sounds great, thanks for sharing! As it turns out, just yesterday, Ampled approved my page, so both links that I posted work. Love your guitar playing. Great song.
 
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