Studer 928 Story...

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
So this Story actually starts in this thread here:

Hittin’ The Road Again...

So go check that out and then come back here.

Some of you might be wondering why I'm getting another console...I mean, I've got the Tascam M-__ prototype 12 x 8 console, I've had a Tascam M-520 and M-512, Soundtracs MX32, MCI JH-416, and Teac 5B mixing consoles...I think there have been some smaller ones in there too...Tascam M-106...A Mackie...ummm...couple Allen & Heath. They've all been projects to to lesser or greater degrees...mostly greater I think...but I've put a lot of effort into the Tascam M-__ even to the point of collaborating with some really smart people to redesign the output line driver to better interface with my Ampex multitrack machine. So, what gives with the Studer? Unlike most everything else I've purchased audio equipment wise, the Studer was relatively expensive (still got a REALLY great deal on it compared to what I see elsewhere in the market), and it needs relatively little to be fully operational. Well, its like this...probably the main reason has to do with the Ampex tape machine. I'd like to be able to run the Ampex in 16-track trim. At 12 main input channels, the Tascam isn't really setup to easily mix and monitor 16 tape returns. It could be done, but it would be a kludge. The Tascam is wonderfully unique and I'm pretty attached to it. I don't imagine it will be going away, but in all the collaborative work I've been doing the past year or so to beef up the outputs, with the things I'm learning I'm realizing even with all the mods and tweaks, it will never be what something like the Studer is. And that's always been gnawing at me. I mean NO disrespect to Tascam and I hope that's clear. The Studer was, I think, something like maybe $60,000 or $70,000 new in 2000. Its in a different class. There are beneath the skin differences in the construction, materials, design (physical and electrical)...its a different animal designed with different priorities. Teac has done such a great job over so many years innovating features, innovating ways to bring features to consumers that otherwise would not be able to access them. They also have produced some very seriously professional products. The Tascam M-__ is purposely in a particular class. The Studer is, from a feature standpoint, a better match with the Ampex. And I know the Ampex isn't going away. So...Ever since I let go of the MCI project a few years ago (because I finally admitted it was too big a project than I wanted or felt I could complete), I was really settling in a way for the Tascam, telling myself I would probably just run the Ampex as a 1" 8-track, and ignoring what I really wanted. All the while I troll eBay, Reverb, craigslist...I had devised a pretty specific list of features I wanted a mixer to have, and pretty much had decided that it was out of reach. Then the Studer came along on craigslist. The seller and I turned out to have a mutual respected friend who's also an electronics genius...and the operations and service manual is readily available as a download online. So there was about a week of chewing on all that and consulting with my friend...and bouncing it off of others including miroslav. It was WAY not in the budget. But I talked with my wife about it. Folks, something is changing. I've spent so much time tinkering and fixing and refurbishing, there's no music being made, and my priorities have shifted...I've learned A LOT in the process. But all the fixing stuff keeps making the end goal look like its getting further away; not what I want to be doing...not how I want to spend my time so much. That will still be a piece of things always...I really enjoy that. But its become bigger than I can see through...all the work left to do on the Tascam M-__ and I knew it still wasn't going to be "it" for me. And spending time with my wife and the kids too is my favorite thing nowadays...tinkering takes away from that. And my wife likes the the music making part. So my wife encouraged me as did others, to pull the trigger, and off my son and I went to get it. I won't repeat what's in the prequel thread linked above...it was a memorable trip. So that's how I came to the decision, and I'm not regretting it.

So far the tinkering to do on the Studer aside from detailing it at some point, includes some work to do on the power supplies (but SIMPLE stuff...new quieter cooling fans, the lids are missing screws), and the power supply umbilicals need reinforcing. The console itself needs one of the master buss meters looked at...its dead. That may be ALL.

This Studer 928 was commissioned for one of my local state universities in 2000 or 2001. The Studer 928 is built to order with up to 8 mix busses, and a maximum number 96 input modules. I'll put up a link to the sales brochure at some point. But anyway, the university is where this one lived, probably in a broadcast or performance facility until it was put on the university auction block in 2015...probably replaced by a digital console. That's when the fella I bought it from brought it home to his home-based production facility. He's a busy Seattle area engineer/producer and has put out some great stuff. He's going a different direction with his studio and so the Studer went into clean heated storage nearly a year ago.

Now some pictures.

Here's the master section...four mix busses each with assignable stereo returns, onboard linkable and patchable compressor/limiter, hybrid opamp/transformer balanced output, clean +23.5dBu balanced output at 600ohm, 40ohm nominal...dual masters have onboard stereo limiter, and also have the same hybrid output. The control room and studio control modules to the far right have tons of super useful monitoring and talkback control features, and also house the four VCA group master faders...all the faders are VCA controlled which means no scritchy ever from the P&G faders. And then there's the handy and very useful TT patchbay...always wanted a console with its own patchbay...all inserts are balanced.

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The meter bridge...its all modular. Mine comes with meters for the groups, dual masters, and switchable stereo correlation meter, and meters for the 8 AUX groups (10 meters...6 mono AUXes and 2 stereo...) plus there are gain reduction meters for all of the dynamics processors (4 mono and 2 stereo), and again its modular, like a horizontal rack for meter modules...any 900 series analog or digital meters will mount up:

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And here are some mono and stereo input channel modules:

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And here is the backplane...All XLR I/O, except for in the master section some of the I/O is grouped on to 39-pin DIN 41622 connectors (I think most commonly referred to as Tuchel connectors, but they are made by a number of companies and come in a variety of pin counts, but DIN 41622 is the official connector type):

IMG_3972.JPG

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ALL of the I/O is balanced, including the I/O on the DIN 41622 connectors, and as mentioned above the patchbay is balanced...and even though only the group and dual master buss outs have the transformers (which give a *little* step-up boost), all of the outputs have plenty of drive...everything is +6dBu nominal and even the electronically balanced direct outs can push +21dBu at 200ohms with ultra low distortion.

I love the backlit switches...and the switches are really high quality. Most of the switching is electronic...in other words signal doesn't pass through the switch, the switch controls logic which does the actual switching...this eliminates any pops and clicks when switching signal in and out, especially problematic as the switch ages. Any circuits where logic switching wasn't feasible, gold contact switches were used. So...yes...this console is full of logic chips, which usually scares me away, but its all 4000 series logic...and I've gotten a lot more comfortable with that in trying to figure out some stuff on my Tascam console...but I like lights...and they're all LED...low maintenance and long-life:

IMG_3978.JPG


The 928 uses a strategic combination of opamps...The mic transformer is followed by a 5534...I am a fan of the 5534 and 5532. The single 5534 opamp is nice because the compensation is externally adjustable via one of the pins, so you can tune the opamp for the given circuit. The rest are dual opamps, again, the 5532, and a lot of 33078, TL072, and 2142 parts. "They did their homework" says my really smart electronics friend. All the components are high quality, and the component layout appears to have been designed with a certain aesthetic in mind.

As I mentioned early in the post I need to do some work on the power supply umbilical cables...they are *okay*, but when the fella I bought it from got it in the university auction, whoever decommissioned it didn't retain the original cables, so they needed to be built, which he did. There are three power supplies, each power a section of the frame. At the supply end the connector is a circular 10-pin connector that is supposed to have a threaded locking collar. Those are missing from the connectors the seller sourced, and one is missing the strain relief as well. And the cable is too big for the entry into the cable mount plug. So, not all sure how deep I'm going to go, but as it stands the plugs are relatively easy to pull out and I see that as a safety issue...and I don't like how they look. I haven't started working on finding the missing parts or new connectors altogether. But I'm not concerned. This is what I'm working with...no discredit to the seller...these are functional...I know the parts are hard to source...and I'm very particular:

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At the other end there are 30-pin DIN 41622 connectors...two of them. The seller found the connector blocks themselves, but not the hoods, which provide a safety barrier, strain relief, and latching between the two connector blocks. The seller said the parts were impossible to find. He doesn't know what I'm capable of...buddy...YOU try finding the parts to make a Tascam M-520 umbilical... :D You can actually find the stuff new, but no joke its like $60 for each set (connector block and hood)...I've already got the blocks for the power connectors obviously, but no hoods at all for the power connectors OR the audio I/O connectors, and only 3 of the 6 connector blocks for the audio stuff...until yesterday...For about $90 shipped I found what I needed from a fella in Germany...he was selling bundles of 4 hoods with connector blocks, you tell him what you need and he digs through his box to see if he has it...the price was right so I didn't haggle about only needing 3 39-pin connector blocks and all the hoods...and I wanted a spare hood, so I got 9 hoods with connector blocks...spares for everything and that's $10 per set. And this is why something needs to be done...look at this...because the cable is so stiff, the power connectors have to be periodically checked and reseated...that's no good:

IMG_3995.JPG


I'm trying to think of what else to say...there's a lot on my mind about it just because there's so much about it that I like...its going to be a great fit with the rest of my gear. Oh and here's another thing that seems to be changing with me...I have a bad habit of getting something and then wanting to do some impossible reconfiguration with it to make it something it wasn't necessarily intended to be...sometimes this turns out pretty good, other times it just takes a LOT of time and patience and ends up compromising something. Well I originally had it in mind, since the frame is assembled of 3 buckets, to swap the master section into the middle to make a true split console...12 mono input modules on the left, master section in the middle, 16 mono/stereo line modules on the right for tape/DAW returns or whatever...the more I look at this I see how "made to order" these things are...I mean, they ARE modular, but all the patchbay and armrest labeling is actually etched...the motherboards configured for input or master section modules...the backplane same thing...there would have to be a MAJOR tear-down and reorg of the whole frame assembly to get it to work, and I'm sure I'd need to make custom cabling to extend connections...and then I might be compromising the build...and labeling wouldn't line up...the patchbay would become a confusing place. Leave it alone I decided...which is huge for me. If you haven't ever checked out my Soundtracs MX32 Story thread look at what I did there...turned it from a 32 x 8 x 2 console into a 24 x 8 x 2 x 8...meter bridge panel and ribbon cable mods...rivets drilled out, frame bins separated and reassembled...it was a huge project. I think it was a better console after that was done especially with the ground scheme redo...but this is a whole different animal. There are four vacant slots in the frame...they have blanks...I decided to put two blanks in between the mono modules and 16 stereo modules, and between the stereo modules and the master section. It creates the visual separation I'm looking for to segregate the functions of the control surface. Done. Massive time wasting risky project averted. You can see the minor difference in the before and after below:

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And for now I leave you with this...this console is so cool it even cares for you emotionally...when you're in the middle of the session and you've lost your mojo, look no further than this button over in the studio control module...press it and you'll be feeling fine...genius!

IMG_3993.JPG


Okay...gotta run...now that I've verified the console powers up and things are more or less working, the next step is to just hear how audio sounds through it...I rarely have time to play so off I go!
 

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miroslav

Cosmic Cowboy
Looking at all those pics now...yeah, for sure, that's a serious piece of gear.
That's the kind of console I would have preferred, one that has a bit more modern features, and I did look for quite some time (you remember all the conversations we had)...but after looking for about 4 years, I needed to make move, and when the Trident came up, it was a shit-or-get-off moment (same thing you had with this Studer). My Trident is more classic old-school analog, an I love it for that vibe, but it doesn't have as many modern features as your Studer...but it's a good 10 years older too. Not complaining...I've gotten very comfortable with the Trident...but that Studer is sweet, especially for what you paid for it.

I'll have to reread your lengthy post again to soak up all the details...but the pictures alone say a 1000 words. :)
I know it will be a bit of time before you're at that fully hooked-up state with the tape deck and peripherals...but don't let it lay too long, don't lose the motivation. This is your shit-or-get-off moment to go all-in. Not sure how old your son is...but this could be his legacy...to dive into recording along your side. That gear has a long life and it will only be more valuable with time, and you know how to keep it in top shape.
 

RFR

Well-known member
Shit! Way above my pay grade. Even the hookups scare me. Lol :D
But it looks like a serious piece of gear.
Congrats, and I'm sure you'll keep us posted.
 

famous beagle

Well-known member
Yeah, that it something I can definitely say is beyond my capacity. If I ever were to score something like that (not that I have the slightest need for it right now), I would certainly need to hire someone to set it up for me.

Congrats again!
 

Zacharia

New member
Congratulations on getting an incredible desk.

I have a 269 that I use with my TRS-8. For an 8 track tape machine I think these smaller Studer Boards are the best way to go, particularly for someone in my shoes. I record myself, and it's rare that I am ever tracking anything other than mono (even drums). What they lack in bussing and routing options they more than make up for in sound.

Your 928 is a wayyyy more flexible beast than my little 269, but I think my main point is that these are serious pieces of kit. Plus, they are very user-friendly to work on. I look forward to hearing how you think this board sounds.

Congrats again. I've lurked here for many years. I really wanted to chime in on this thread so I finally signed up and did!
 

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
Thanks for the input/feedback everybody! Will respond in more detail later. In the meantime here is a link to the discontinued product site for the 928:

928 | Studer Professional Mixing Consoles

Specifically here is a link to the sales brochure:

https://www.av-iq.com/avcat/images/documents/pdfs/928_brochure.pdf

Here's one of the songs for which the seller sent me a link so I could hear something tracked and mixed through the Studer:

YouTube

Now, that to me sounds great...this was a Protools project, but tracked and mixed through the Studer. I wanted to know how much of the end result was attributable to the Studer, which is, of course a totally dubious question, but I had to ask just to get any kind of subjective information. I know a final mix is so much a culmination of the performance, the instruments, the mics, the mic placement, the front end, the recording medium and what surrounds that (the type of tape machine and how it was setup, or the A/D/A converters and DAW audio engine), and any processing and effects used during tracking and mixing/mastering, so it’s NEVER just one thing, but, depending on the workflow process, the mixing console is in the middle of it all and can either hinder, enable, or even create sonic greatness. So I asked how significant a role did the the seller feel the Studer played on that song?

He replied "Well... like you mentioned, it’s hard to say, but I did use plenty of eq and probably a little of the stereo panning [the stereo width filter on the stereo modules]. I always found the board to be fairly neutral, maybe a tiny tiny bit rolled off at the highest frequencies and no weird reaction to transients."

My greatest take-away from our dialog on this subject, and really the final push to pull the trigger, was that the Studer doesn't stand in the way of that kind of final mix. And the neutral character I think is good in my setup since I'll have some great tape machines for tracking and mastering. And actually I'm reasonable certain the sound of audio through it will make smile.

Didn't make it out to actually pass program material through the console last night...maybe tonight...
 

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
Amazing...

I’m still amazed when any complex audio device over 15 years old still works well.

Hooked up a stereo source and tested all input modules. The stereo modules have two stereo inputs per module, switch selectable...they all work and work well except for one module, one side is crunchy on input 1 and input 2. Sounds like a blown opamp. Everything is super clean and quiet. VCA controls work. This console is in super solid shape. And...I love the EQ. It is super easy to dial in what you need. The HF and LF shelving EQ sounds sweet. And overall the sound is sweet through the console and that’s just to the headphone jack...noise floor is super low. I’m smiling. Can’t wait to have things setup. It’s going to be a bit because the space has to be finished first, but this thing is awesome. The stereo width filter is really neat too...powerful tool.
 

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
...like the EQ just totally does what you need it or want it to do, without causing more trouble. And makes stuff sound good. I spent like an hour running all sorts of program material through it and it was super easy to manage problem frequencies with the mid bands and sweeten or tame the high end with the sweepable HF shelving filter and either control the low end by cutting at 30-50Hz or use the low shelving in conjunction with the hi pass filter to tighten up the low end or bring out certain frequencies...super useful. It just works. And this wasn’t even the EQ on the mono modules with the switcheable Q on the mid bands.

I was a little bummed it looks like the stereo modules aren’t configured with a direct out? But instead two stereo inputs...switch selectable. I have a text out to the seller to confirm this and I need to refer to the manual again and look at what the options were and look at the schematics again, but I was thinking about this...this means I could easily have 16 mono tape returns as well as multiple DAW returns and other stereo sources all hooked up at the same time and switch between them as needed. No need for a patchbay. Those 16 stereo modules have a total of 64 balanced line inputs. And you can basically sum any pair as dual mono or stereo, and switch between each set of jacks, stereo or mono.

All the VCA masters work great. Super cool.

This thing is really quiet. I’m not used to opening up 8, 16 or 24 channels with no sources, pumping the trims and faders and hearing almost nothing in the monitors.
 
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cyrano

New member
I always found the board to be fairly neutral, maybe a tiny tiny bit rolled off at the highest frequencies and no weird reaction to transients."

That about sums it up.

You make me real jealous :D

Finding a desk like this at a reasonable price is remarkable. Even here in Europe, where you still can find some from broadcast, these are snatched up by traders immediately. In fact, I've given up hope of ever finding one. Unfortunately all the rest is inferior (in build quality and sound) or even more rare and expensive.

I'm sure you'll enjoy that desk endlessly.

You lucky dog, you! :D
 

miroslav

Cosmic Cowboy
...like the EQ just totally does what you need it or want it to do, without causing more trouble.

Yeah man....that was the problem I had with my Tascam 3500. Overall, a really good console, had great routing options, the whole in-line with both long and mini faders was a super feature, loved the LED metering...BUT...I just could never get anything decent out of the channel EQs....and I'm pretty sure most of the earlier and later Tascam/Teac mixer models were no better in the EQ department.

You're hearing that now...same as with my Trident...the EQs are "musical" (whatever that means)...bottom line, they are not fighting you, they actually help you dial in the tones.
You're gonna really enjoy that Studer! :thumbs up:
 

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
[MENTION=94267]miroslav[/MENTION]

Looking at all those pics now...yeah, for sure, that's a serious piece of gear.
That's the kind of console I would have preferred, one that has a bit more modern features, and I did look for quite some time (you remember all the conversations we had)...but after looking for about 4 years, I needed to make move, and when the Trident came up, it was a shit-or-get-off moment (same thing you had with this Studer). My Trident is more classic old-school analog, an I love it for that vibe, but it doesn't have as many modern features as your Studer...but it's a good 10 years older too. Not complaining...I've gotten very comfortable with the Trident...but that Studer is sweet, especially for what you paid for it.

Yeah I do remember our correspondence about the Trident...looking back through your Trident thread I still think you did really well with that console. Looking at the pics of the channel PBCs reminds me of my Soundtracs console...really liked how that console sounded. Your Trident is a good console...I absolutely love how it looks, and the mods that were done prior to your acquisition, particularly to the ground scheme and the Acopian power supplies...those are serious mods with serious results, not to mention the recapping you did and the select opamp replacements. I’m not looking at any mods or recapping on mine, at least not for quite some time, if at all as far as the opamps go. Studer used good quality caps, and the console isn’t yet 20 years old. When that time comes (I can’t remember if I mentioned this), the seller purchased all the caps to recap the entire console and purchased nice 105C “audio grade” caps. And Studer got it right with the ground scheme...top notch. Your Trident was built in the era where “star-grounding” was the marketing hype. It was a bad idea...all wrong as far as I’m concerned and supported by help I got on my Soundtracs from the late Neil Muncy who was published in the AES Journal regarding grounding in professional audio systems. It looks like whoever modified your grounding scheme employed best practices. I kind of drool over your Acopian linear supplies...the supplies that came with the Studer are “switchers”...switching power supplies vs. linear. I need to research more on that. They are the original Studer designed supplies which my friend says is good, and I know switching power supplies are extremely common, but I think there has been some controversy in their application to larger complex devices...I guess the main concern is the switching noise that can be induced into the audio path if they are too close to the audio circuitry, but the Studer supplies are external. I’ll just have to be mindful of their placement once setup. Anyway, FWIW there are still facets of your Trident about which I’m envious. I really appreciate the value of the logic switching in my Studer, but it increases the challenge in troubleshooting...the input modules’ schematics are spread across five 11 x 17 pages each! :eek: Your Trident is relatively more straight-ahead.

I know it will be a bit of time before you're at that fully hooked-up state with the tape deck and peripherals...but don't let it lay too long, don't lose the motivation. This is your shit-or-get-off moment to go all-in. Not sure how old your son is...but this could be his legacy...to dive into recording along your side. That gear has a long life and it will only be more valuable with time, and you know how to keep it in top shape.

Thanks! Yeah all those ideations are in sight. It will take some time before I can set things up and finish the Ampex, because the space is not ready...still have electrical, insulation, sheetrock, and finish carpentry to do...and that takes money, and we don’t have it, especially after nabbing the Studer...and before any of that I have to sell a bunch of stuff to pay for the Studer and help us keep up, and finding time to do that is even hard...case in point it’s taken me three days to compose this post! So...momentum will be up and down on this. It’s just really not possible for me to relegate a chunk of time to anything the way things are right now and for the foreseeable future. But I definitely feel at peace with the Studer.

....that was the problem I had with my Tascam 3500. Overall, a really good console, had great routing options, the whole in-line with both long and mini faders was a super feature, loved the LED metering...BUT...I just could never get anything decent out of the channel EQs....and I'm pretty sure most of the earlier and later Tascam/Teac mixer models were no better in the EQ department.

Right. Yeah. I hate to say it, but that’s kind of the same feeling I have. I really, really appreciate the routing and online monitoring features of the Tascam consoles I’ve used, which really boils down to the M-300 and M-500 series...388 too...and my prototype mixer is thrown in there since it led to the M-500 series...even the little M-106 incorporates some inline monitoring. But I avoided using the EQ, even on the Tascam M-__ prototype mixer in spite of the robust EQ feature set (four swept bands, the two mid-bands fully parametric with sweepable Q...two HPFs and one LPF). The EQ drove me to finding other ways to solve certain problems, which, in a way, was good...I *should* be working on mic placement (for instance) instead of just running to the EQ section, right? But when I did need EQ I found it a struggle to solve issues with it. Like the EQ would change the sound but not entirely improve the sound if that makes sense...like there was always some trade-off. By contrast my Soundtracs console did something to the sound that I liked. The Studer is like that...like, let’s say there a mid-range sonic cluster-mess...boost the low-mid band, swweeeep...swweeeeep, sweep-sweep-sweep, it’s around 800Hz, dial it back somewhere between -3 to -5dB, cool...can hear everything better, but then I A/B it with the EQ on/off control it’s not just that the problem frequency is abated, the whole thing just sounds sweeter. I think at least some of my hangups with the Tascam EQs has to do with the fact that with the models and series ranges mentioned above (excluding the M-106) ALL the EQ bands are peaking with the exception of the M-300 series hi band...that’s the only one that’s shelving. If swept peaking mid-bands have a decent enough range I really like shelving lo and hi bands, particularly if there is a HPF onboard. You can do a lot with a HPF and lo shelving EQ depending on the knee point of the HPF...sweepable HPF is super handy but that’s above my pay grade. :D Anyway...again, not trying to be disparaging about the Tascam gear. My general misgivings about the EQ may be nothing less than my own shortcomings.

You're hearing that now...same as with my Trident...the EQs are "musical" (whatever that means)...bottom line, they are not fighting you, they actually help you dial in the tones.
You're gonna really enjoy that Studer!

Yep, yep and yep! :)
 

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
Shit! Way above my pay grade. Even the hookups scare me. Lol :D
But it looks like a serious piece of gear.
Congrats, and I'm sure you'll keep us posted.

Yeah it looks a little intimidating at first, but it’s mostly straight-ahead XLR, and the label plates are really clear about what’s what...the six 39-pin DIN 41622 connectors are a bit mysterious looking too, but all the key stuff you’d generally need access to for master section I/O are all on XLR jacks. The DSUB-9 connectors above each column of channel jacks are for remote triggering of external devices...like you can set machines to go into REC or PLAY when you move a particular channel fader from infinity and such...and external mute control, external VCA fader control...broadcast stuff...stuff I don’t think I’ll ever use.
 
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sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
Congratulations on getting an incredible desk.

I have a 269 that I use with my TRS-8. For an 8 track tape machine I think these smaller Studer Boards are the best way to go, particularly for someone in my shoes. I record myself, and it's rare that I am ever tracking anything other than mono (even drums). What they lack in bussing and routing options they more than make up for in sound.

Your 928 is a wayyyy more flexible beast than my little 269, but I think my main point is that these are serious pieces of kit. Plus, they are very user-friendly to work on. I look forward to hearing how you think this board sounds.

Congrats again. I've lurked here for many years. I really wanted to chime in on this thread so I finally signed up and did!

Hey glad you did! :)

That sounds like a pretty sweet setup. You should consider posting a pic or two...I bet the TSR-8 and Studer console look pretty cool together, and I bet you get good sounds out it.
 

sweetbeats

Reel deep thoughts...
So I did confirm none of the slots configured for the stereo modules (slots 13 through 32) have any direct out access. The modules themselves have direct out capability, and the motherboard is likely configured to pass the signal, but what I believe is missing is cabling from the motherboard to the backplane, and then the connector on the backplane; saw a pic of the back of another 928 and unlike mine each group of four channels’ jacks have a DSUB-25 connector at the top of the jack plate. This is what mine doesn’t have. And it’s not that it’s “missing” per se, mine just wasn’t ordered with that option. A broadcast facility wouldn’t really have need for tons of direct outs. I still haven’t figured out how I feel about this because I still haven’t really mapped out how all my gear will be hooked up and furthermore run through scenarios in my mind. But...I think if I spent much time dwelling on it I’d be over thinking it...right? All 12 mono modules have balanced direct out jacks on XLRs, and furthermore there are the four group outs, and another independent assignable stereo pair since there are two full-featured independent stereo master busses...so as-is the console can feed 18 tracks at a time, which is more than my Ampex can handle, and more than I can reasonably imagine ever having to track to the DAW simultaneously. So I really shouldn’t worry about this.

On the flip-side I have a total of 64 line inputs, across 16 stereo/mono/dual-mono input modules, so up to 32 line inputs can be monitored on those 16 modules at a time depending on if they are stereo, mono or dual mono sources...and all of this is controlled from the control surface...there are 64 XLR input jacks, so there’s easily enough there to have at minimum 16 mono tape returns or 16 mono DAW returns for summing depending on whether it’s a tape or DAW project, and if some tracks are stereo pairs, well then those can be hanged in stereo on one module leaving stereo modules available for whatever...but that can all be hooked up all the time, and press buttons to flip/mix/match whatever I’m summing. And there’s still four full-featured stereo returns and eight stereo/mono external inputs in the master section. This is all in addition to the 12 mono modules which have mic and line inputs with separate trims and amps...like totally separate.

A lot of times the output of the mic amp feeds the line amp on a mixer input strip, so if you’re using the line input that jack just skips over the mic amp. The Studer has entirely distinct and specialized amps for the mic amp and line amp...the mic amp is transformer coupled and then it goes to a tuned 5534-based amp. The line input is a high level electronically balanced amp based around (IIRC) a 33078...the mic trim is a stacked pot, the collar of which sets the range in eight 10dB steps for the mic amp, and then the knob sweeps over a 10dB range. This makes for a quieter mic amp at the extremes, and also accommodates a wider range of mic signals. The line input trim is actually a +/-15dB center-detented pot...the center “0” position assumes a +6dBu nominal signal, but the trim pot will accommodate -10dBv all the way up to super hot inputs.

Wow I went off of my own topic. Anyway...I’m not sure how or even if I’ll utilize an external patchbay, but if I do my preliminary thought is to use it for my outputs, so I can patch the direct, group and main outputs to multitrack tape and DAW inputs, normalled for the most common scenarios, and then also have aux outputs and outboard effect I/Os as well as stereo returns in the patchbay for managing my send effects...lots to think about.............but it’s fun. And bottom line I think the Studer has adequate I/O as-is for my needs.
 
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miroslav

Cosmic Cowboy
And bottom line I think the Studer has adequate I/O as-is for my needs.

For sure, if you can cover your needs with the on-board bay...that's less muss-n-fuss for you. :)

Not trying to brag...but I got a shit load of outboard gear (probably twice as much as I really need)...plus I wanted the capability to do at least 24 channels A/D/A so I could dump from my Otari...plus I have another 8 channels, that let's me bring out up to 32 channels from the DAW to mix through the Trident.
Having all that easily accessible and reconfigurable, required a lot of patchbay points.

Look...you can easily expand with the bays down the road if needed...which is how it went for me and where I ended up with the 7 bays x 96 I/O points each.
At this point, I've almost maxed out both patchbay points and rack space...thank god for that...so I would have to do some serious additions to get more. I have one pair of unused I/O points left.

Oh...I just say a bunch of Studer boards on eBay, I think a pair of 928s and a couple of others...plus Studer decks....but they are all being sold out of South Korea.
I can only imagine it's from some studio/broadcast facility that was introduced the USA at some point. It just looks like it's gear from about 20-30 years back, but in pretty good shape...so it has to be some commercial studio.
Anyway...the pair of 928 consoles are about $5-6k each...and that's because they are in SK. I mean, not too many people will pay to have that stuff shipped so the pricing on the gear is lower than what it would go for if it was here in the USA or over in Europe.
Bottom line...you got a great deal on yours! :cool:
 

ecc83

Well-known member
That about sums it up.

You make me real jealous :D

Finding a desk like this at a reasonable price is remarkable. Even here in Europe, where you still can find some from broadcast, these are snatched up by traders immediately. In fact, I've given up hope of ever finding one. Unfortunately all the rest is inferior (in build quality and sound) or even more rare and expensive.

I'm sure you'll enjoy that desk endlessly.

You lucky dog, you! :D

Beware Cyrano with any desk from a "broadcast" source. They are often configured to operate at much lower internal levels than recording desks (which are usually -2dBu) to give greater headroom. Noise for broadcast is not such an issue as it is for recording (even for tape!) but headroom is.

Dave.
 

cyrano

New member
I’ve owned quite a few desks from broadcast sources. They seem to have Some mythical properties for Some believers. Usually, there’s not much difference from the non-broadcast verslons.

And a Studer is very configurable...
 

ecc83

Well-known member
I’ve owned quite a few desks from broadcast sources. They seem to have Some mythical properties for Some believers. Usually, there’s not much difference from the non-broadcast verslons.

And a Studer is very configurable...

Oh! I am sure Mr C and Sweatbeats has obviously got a good'en. I mentioned the OP level point just for general interest. Someone "could" buy what they though was a bargain but find it a bit hissy? Especially for those fussy digital folk!

Oooo! Just noticed you are in the Royal Borough! I spent many a weekend there as a kid. Mum's sister lived in Alexander rd and her husband had a butcher's shop there. Bin round the tower, down the walk and played in many a pub garden whilst M&D "refreshed" themselves
Dave.
 

sasquatch

Member
I was under the impression broadcast console designs put extra effort with regards to noise and especially crosstalk.
Balanced summing,robust ground schemes and some +8dBu nominal outputs.Maybe just the good ones.

G
 
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