Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 71

Thread: A question for the pros - Getting into sound engineering.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    ArizonaMaybe
    Age
    69
    Posts
    9,544
    Thanks
    216
    Thanked 173 Times in 161 Posts
    Rep Power
    9581210
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Quote Originally Posted by PhilLondon View Post
    Thanks. Just for clarity, Mixsit sent me a link where someone else was asking a similar question but they were already in college, asking if they had made a big mistake due to the current state of studios and the industry. ...
    The reason I thought it might still be relevant was the notion that most of the money if any to be made in 'Music Production' was for the guys' selling of 'tuitions and other such, rather than the 'engineers.
    Placebo stomps 96k ....... Recent projects
    Ray Catfish Copeland 'Got Love Jim Goodman 'Southern Steel

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Age
    34
    Posts
    19,438
    Thanks
    1,202
    Thanked 1,021 Times in 902 Posts
    Rep Power
    1000000
    Quote Originally Posted by mjbphotos View Post
    Look at the folk here who had (or still have) recording studios - very few are doing it for a full-time living, and fewer of those have anyone working for them.
    Even fewer have a B.A.(hons) in Music Production.

    Your question was for "the pros". I'm not one, just so you know, but I've taken the course you're talking about.

    I'm sure there are exceptions but my feeling going into, and coming out of, that course is this.
    There are guys who went in with very little knowledge hoping to come out full prepared recording engineers. They didn't.
    Without a foundation they just weren't taking in the important stuff.
    There were guys who went in pretty knowledgable hoping to get a bit of paper or connections that might maybe help them get a job somewhere. They didn't.

    Unless your college or university is seriously connected and offering placement opportunities or something, I'd just buy a book.

    That might sound like the view of some bitter guy who didn't get anywhere. I got first class honours in the course and I'm embarking on a career in music/music production with reasonable enough opportunities ahead.
    It's just that the two aren't related.

    Honestly, I'm not sure that age really matters at all. Or, at least, it's not the first thing you're going to be judged on.
    ---------- Steenaudio Website ----------

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Steenamaroo For This Useful Post:


  4. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    paradise
    Posts
    4,340
    Thanks
    102
    Thanked 552 Times in 497 Posts
    Rep Power
    8012023
    Hmm career in the medical profession....career in audio engineering.

    If it was me, I'd keep the day job. Much more financially rewarding, not to mention you can find a job anywhere in the country.

    Now don't get me wrong, I'm all about doing what is your passion for a living, but as someone who works in the music industry, I can say this. It's a rough life.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    London of course!
    Posts
    277
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Rep Power
    214754
    Quote Originally Posted by Steenamaroo View Post
    Even fewer have a B.A.(hons) in Music Production.

    Your question was for "the pros". I'm not one, just so you know, but I've taken the course you're talking about.

    I'm sure there are exceptions but my feeling going into, and coming out of, that course is this.
    There are guys who went in with very little knowledge hoping to come out full prepared recording engineers. They didn't.
    Without a foundation they just weren't taking in the important stuff.
    There were guys who went in pretty knowledgable hoping to get a bit of paper or connections that might maybe help them get a job somewhere. They didn't.

    Unless your college or university is seriously connected and offering placement opportunities or something, I'd just buy a book.

    That might sound like the view of some bitter guy who didn't get anywhere. I got first class honours in the course and I'm embarking on a career in music/music production with reasonable enough opportunities ahead.
    It's just that the two aren't related.

    Honestly, I'm not sure that age really matters at all. Or, at least, it's not the first thing you're going to be judged on.
    I understand. I do believe we will get placements in local recording studios, so that would be invaluable imo. I'm not necessarily looking for a job in a studio, like I said, I'd happily build up a portfolio and try and build a reputation locally after obtaining the qualification.

    RFR - Like I said, I will go back to work after, and try and build up a side business in my locality. I'm just taking a break from my career, but will still be working within the profession doing the same job but without the shackles of a full time job which will broaden my horizons in something that I'm passionate about. I can literally go back to the same role, or go into a different area in a promoted role.

    Personally I think it would work out. I'm only taking a career break with a view to building up a side business. Whether I need this course to do that is a different matter but I feel that the opportunities within placements would be pretty invaluable, if they are as available as I'm hoping. A lack of placements could be an issue, as could my age if people would prefer a younger person to come in, for whatever reason. Hopefully this kind of discrimination wouldn't be too common, but I feel that it might be naive to think it's not. Stuff to think about I guess.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Age
    53
    Posts
    15,254
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 489 Times in 436 Posts
    Rep Power
    15179948
    I've been a professional sound engineer for over 20 years. My thoughts about the age is that it doesn't matter. The intern system is pretty well dead, so that isn't an issue.

    The schooling is a waste of time, in my opinion, for two reasons:
    1. Even though you may learn how to do something, they really don't teach you when or why to do it.
    2. The more important skills necessary to run a studio are business skills, not sound engineering skills. Getting a business degree will do you more good than an audio degree.

    Since the music industry isn't creating new rock stars, the idea of finding a local band and helping them "make it" so that you can ride their loyal coat tails to the top is also dead.

    The only possible upside to getting the degree would be the social aspect of the school. If it is a school that does all.sorts of production, you might fall in with guys who are studying film making and become the next film dream team.

    Other than that, everything they will teach you can be gotten from a book, or this forum. No need to compromise your income and take on student debt. This really is an area where most of what you need to know isn't taught in school. (At least not an audio engineering and production class)
    Jay Walsh
    Farview Recording. I am also the forum spokesmodel for Terasyne Amplification

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Farview For This Useful Post:


  8. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Age
    37
    Posts
    1,474
    Thanks
    133
    Thanked 48 Times in 45 Posts
    Rep Power
    1552530
    I can really only weigh in on the age thing. In my humble opinion age, to a certain extent, shouldn't be factored into your decision making process. Think of anyone else who had a period of frictional unemployment, going back to school to make a career change (I'm doing that same thing myself). It's hardly uncommon and shouldn't be much of a concern, especially since you'd only be 35 when you're done (I'll be the same age when I finish my finance degree). Again, in my opinion, it's not about age as much as it is about drive and the ability to learn and grow (on or off the job). Just my $0.02.

    If your mixes are getting better, try to get out and find a local artist that you can record for cheap (or free) just for some experience. You most likely won't find any golden tickets, like farview eluded to in his post, but you'll get experience recording a group other than just yourself (or your band) and you could, in a perfect world, possibly get referrals from that experience as well. Might not ever turn into something that could pay the bills but, on the other side of the same coin, you wouldn't have the tuition debt to repay either.
    Intel i5 3.1ghz, Win7 Home Premium 64 bit, 16gb RAM, focusrite saffire pro40, Cubase 7.5, lazy pit bull (gets it from her mother).

  9. #17
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    1,012
    Thanks
    195
    Thanked 121 Times in 114 Posts
    Rep Power
    2383180
    Quote Originally Posted by PhilLondon View Post
    This is the course.

    BA (Hons) Music Production | BIMM

    Mjb - I'm aware of that. I'd be happy to find some kind of volunteer work on my own and try and promote myself.

    Robus - I would be sacrificing my career while I'm on the course. I would have to quit my job and go freelance. It's a full time course, but I would work shifts on the weekend and the days when the course isn't on where and when I can. Lots of nurses do this as a full time job, no main job just working shift from shift. It's more money and freedom, but no security or career progression.

    I could pretty much jump right back in after the course is over and continue my current career where I left off.

    I want to do it because it's my passion, that's the main thing. I want to learn more about it and I'm prepared to work at building something that could become something that I can supplement my main income with. I have a friend who started in September and we were discussing the course and it sounds exactly what I'd want to do. I am going to visit an open day in Feburary.
    So..........I guess the question is.........how will you feel down the road if you never give it a try? It doesn't seem like you have much to lose........and regret sucks.
    Just A Song Writer..........

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Mickster For This Useful Post:


  11. #18
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    London of course!
    Posts
    277
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Rep Power
    214754
    Farview, Pikingrin-

    Well, I don't have a massive understanding of recording drums, for example. I've never used a mixing desk, I'm not amazing at miking amps. So while I could advertise for local bands and record them, I'd be a bit nervous with trouble shooting phasing issues, miking a kit etc.

    My current setup is Logic Pro X, Kemper Profiling Amp. And I use the drummer program in Logic and the profiles in my Kemper for guitar.

    I can identify issues in my mix, fix them and make the mix sound okay. But in terms of setting up a recording session, there would be a lot of umming and ahhing and I wouldn't want to waste anyone's time so this is one reason why I feel the course would be good. Having a tutor teach this stuff, setting up stages and recording sessions, working in a studio will make it all second nature.

    I guess if there were some intensive courses which provide this could be a good alternative, but the idea of spending three years doing this stuff is so appealing and fun sounding, along with the connections I'd make would make it ideal.

    But I'd definitely be open to an alternative option, but I feel a course of some sort is needed because I don't have the fundamental knowledge of setting up sessions to not waste people's time.

    Mickster - this is what I feel about it all. My partner is encouraging about it too.

  12. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,694
    Thanks
    300
    Thanked 868 Times in 757 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470743
    Quote Originally Posted by PhilLondon View Post
    Farview, Pikingrin-

    Well, I don't have a massive understanding of recording drums, for example. I've never used a mixing desk, I'm not amazing at miking amps. So while I could advertise for local bands and record them, I'd be a bit nervous with trouble shooting phasing issues, miking a kit etc.
    Sure...you could learn some of that from college audio courses...but it's not going to be much different from any other college courses.
    IOW...guys who follow a BA in medicine, don't get a lot of real-world hands on experience during their BA course studies.
    Most it comes later, during their internship.
    So what happens is...audio courses churn out a LOT of new, aspiring engineers/producers...and only a few get placed in actual recording studio environments, and even then, many will initially just end up as studio gophers...watching, learning, and waiting for a break.
    The rest of those audio course graduates might find jobs in corporate A/V, or some other audio related work, that pays, but in the end, is still not the "passion" that they were after. I would rather work in my own studio, doing audio recording, than setting up mics and stuff for some "event" presentation...etc.

    There are many guys who started out in their basement studio and then ended up as top engineers/producers making serious commercial records....but you're going to have to go beyond just Logic and a Kemper profiling amp. these days, EVERYONE is setting up some kind of basic recording studio at home...so you need to offer something more in the way of experience/skill and/or studio gear....or both.

    Or...just keep doing your day job and record for your own pleasure without any pressures or needs to make a profit.
    That's what most guys here do, and some have more than enough experience and gear to do commercial work...and that's what I do also.

  13. #20
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    London of course!
    Posts
    277
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Rep Power
    214754
    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    Sure...you could learn some of that from college audio courses...but it's not going to be much different from any other college courses.
    IOW...guys who follow a BA in medicine, don't get a lot of real-world hands on experience during their BA course studies.
    Most it comes later, during their internship.
    So what happens is...audio courses churn out a LOT of new, aspiring engineers/producers...and only a few get placed in actual recording studio environments, and even then, many will initially just end up as studio gophers...watching, learning, and waiting for a break.
    The rest of those audio course graduates might find jobs in corporate A/V, or some other audio related work, that pays, but in the end, is still not the "passion" that they were after. I would rather work in my own studio, doing audio recording, than setting up mics and stuff for some "event" presentation...etc.

    There are many guys who started out in their basement studio and then ended up as top engineers/producers making serious commercial records....but you're going to have to go beyond just Logic and a Kemper profiling amp. these days, EVERYONE is setting up some kind of basic recording studio at home...so you need to offer something more in the way of experience/skill and/or studio gear....or both.

    Or...just keep doing your day job and record for your own pleasure without any pressures or needs to make a profit.
    That's what most guys here do, and some have more than enough experience and gear to do commercial work...and that's what I do also.
    The studio I always record in have had a new intern every time and he would track is and help set up the session. They seem quite good for that, I could contact them and ask them if they take me on or in what circumstances they would.

    The course I'm looking at focuses on setting up gigs and festivals, recording sessions, putting you in studios to work and understand how to do it all, as well as getting more into mixing and all that it entails.

    I'm not sure how I'd get into it without some kind of professional or academic guidance as I can't have drums in my apartment to practice this kind of thing. Perhaps I could offer to record some local bands and see how it goes? Even just for experience? But again, the course will put me in this environment in a professional way and I'll have guidance.

    There are also courses from the London School of Sound who offer week long intensive courses on things like setting up a studio and mixing/mastering etc That could be an idea.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Question for the Pros: "The Who" sound???
    By nsterken in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-21-2012, 11:00
  2. Want to get into sound engineering as a career!
    By mousedadrummer in forum Marketing Your Music / Publicity
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-06-2008, 11:39
  3. Sound Engineering
    By nicolaad30 in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 05-03-2006, 15:52
  4. Sound Engineering For Dummies !
    By phoneguy44 in forum Gear Reviews & Questions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-18-2003, 10:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •