What do you do with your music?

toddfugere

New member
Just curious what everyone does with their finished music? I work really hard on my recordings, I finish them, let a few people hear them and then that's really about it. When I was in my 20's I thought I was going to be a rock star and pushed really hard to promote myself. That never happened and I had to get a job. Now I'm older, I still love writing/recording, I just never really do anything with my songs when they are done. The other issue I have, is when I have tried to promote my music and get zero interest, I get discouraged. Or if I get negative criticism, then I get annoyed. Maybe I need therapy?

I've heard a lot about Distrokid. Anyone here ever have any luck with that?
 
Hi,
I expect you'll find a lot of people in the same boat around here. :P

I think most just accept that it is what it is; For most, that's a hobby.
I wouldn't discourage anyone from keeping their music publicly available for download, or even for sale,
but expectations have to be realistic otherwise the fun gets sapped out of it fairly quickly, as you discovered. :P

I doubt you need therapy but you probably need to ask yourself if this is a fun hobby or a career.

If it's a career then it's no different to any other. It needs huge commitment, planning, and time put into it.
If it's a hobby, drop us a soundcloud link and enjoy what you do. :)

With regard to negative criticism, try to think of anything you could do in 2019 without negative criticism. ;)
Haters gon' hate.
 

toddfugere

New member
Yeah, totally a hobby. Actually, an obsession. Music gives me joy, is a release, creative outlet, music actually is my current therapy. Lately my recordings have gotten to the point where they are starting to sound sonically really good (to my ears). Past stuff sounded more like poorly recorded demos, etc. I feel like I've gotten better and better. I have put some stuff up on soundcloud, bandcamp, etc. I think the turning point for me was actually finishing my basement and creating a dedicated studio, that is treated. The treatment was HUGE for improving my sound. I cannot recommend this enough. I'm also at the age where I have all of the equipment I want (sure there's always more). But I have everything I need to make great sounding music (except time...never enough of that).
 

mjbphotos

What?!?
Totally a hobby obsession - but I do try to play my original songs out when possible. Released 5 CDs which get very few ales and have the last 3 on Spotify so I get pennies of streaming income regularly!
 

TAE

All you have is now
Hi,
I expect you'll find a lot of people in the same boat around here. :P

I think most just accept that it is what it is; For most, that's a hobby.
I wouldn't discourage anyone from keeping their music publicly available for download, or even for sale,
but expectations have to be realistic otherwise the fun gets sapped out of it fairly quickly, as you discovered. :P

I doubt you need therapy but you probably need to ask yourself if this is a fun hobby or a career.

If it's a career then it's no different to any other. It needs huge commitment, planning, and time put into it.
If it's a hobby, drop us a soundcloud link and enjoy what you do. :)

With regard to negative criticism, try to think of anything you could do in 2019 without negative criticism. ;)
Haters gon' hate.


Spot on response Steen! I guess I have a hard time calling it a hobby......it's just a not a very profitable part of my career / job. It's the most enjoyable part of my career though! Always have hope is my daughters mantra. Hey if you don't buy a ticket you can't win the lottery...you never know right? :) It only took me 10+ years coming here to finally press record and then just VERY simple recordings. I post them in several online places like Reddit, soundcloud and soundclick...and I actually put a few simple originals on Distrokid with zero luck...but then again they are not OMG incredible tunes ....though I get a few haters ( cause they gonna hate) I've gotten a lot of love and encouragement and man when your a player and people enjoy your stuff and let you know it moved them, that is the ultimate paycheck....though hard to pay the bills with.. As I ride off into the sunset of my 15 or so years left here on the big blue marble ( man that is a blink in time) , as long as mind and body allow...I'll be making noise all the way out the door.
 
Yeah, totally a hobby. Actually, an obsession. Music gives me joy, is a release, creative outlet, music actually is my current therapy. Lately my recordings have gotten to the point where they are starting to sound sonically really good (to my ears). Past stuff sounded more like poorly recorded demos, etc. I feel like I've gotten better and better. I have put some stuff up on soundcloud, bandcamp, etc. I think the turning point for me was actually finishing my basement and creating a dedicated studio, that is treated. The treatment was HUGE for improving my sound. I cannot recommend this enough. I'm also at the age where I have all of the equipment I want (sure there's always more). But I have everything I need to make great sounding music (except time...never enough of that).

It's great that you're getting more comfortable with what you do, and with your setup.
Of course I can't speak for everyone but a lot of people subsidise their personal hobby with income from recording others.
Maybe not a career or full time job, sure, but if you get a few hundred bucks from a band for a long weekend that you enjoyed, and learned something from, clicking 'buy' on the next compressor doesn't feel just so bad! :D

I think people view music and recording differently to other arts, and other hobbies.
It's a bit like the masses of 'Can I Sing?' threads against the deficit of 'Can I Drum?' or 'Can I Play Guitar?'.
With become a successful musician appearing to be so accessible people wonder, why is no one buying my music? Why am I not successful?
but I imagine this is probably not the case where the hobby, or passion, is sculpting, painting, writing poetry/literature.

Easier said than done but I suppose we have to figure out what we want from our little hobby, then work out how to get it. ;)
 
If it's a release for one of my bands (many different side projects as I write and record multiple genres) then I'll put it up on Bandcamp (for free, or pay what you want) as the most enjoyable part of recording tracks is to be able to put out a finished release. Lately trying to get a couple tracks done at a time to put out A/B side singles. I've got my main synthpop project "Photovoltaik" up at Distrokid (as well as Bandcamp for free) for wider release and to get onto streaming services, but mainly just to be more visible, as I don't expect any income from this hobby at all. I do it for fun. Or I'll also post tracks to my ReverbNation & Soundcloud available as free downloads of the tracks that I haven't "released" on Bandcamp. Everyone should probably post links in their replies so we can all listen.

Soundcloud
 

damianhk

Member
Todd, I get it. There is so much talent out there. You have a good sound, just heard "No Response". Consider starting a youtube channel. Sometimes, I'll stumble on something great, and it has 12 views. Young hard rock and pop gets alot of hits/views. It is discouraging when i hear about the low pay on streaming. I don't remember the numbers, but i remember roseanne cash talked about getting over 600,000 plays and making about 134 bucks. You have to make it about exposure if you want to make a little change. Personally, I don't worry about it. Exposure could be having a side blog (non musical), doing covers, talking about gear, doing reviews, etc. I've seen alot of talented musicians go this route. For instance, that guy Stevie T was more successful with acting like a dork, but he is really an awesome player, producer, songwriter. I'm trying to figure it out also. I had a side blog, but youtube demonetized me (heh heh), so I just put out a song every month or two, but I'm also looking for avenues and what's best. For now, I have a goal of getting 50 subs and maybe getting a paypal donation someday. Success:)! Good luck, Todd
 
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dwillis45

Número sesenta nueve
I hesitate to call this a hobby. It's a bit too intense, personal, and demanding. On the other hand, I have no market-based ambitions. I am sickened by the music industry and I always have been--even in it's current "wild west" format. I hate 90 percent of what it produces and my hope is that one day it will end itself peacefully or otherwise. In fact, I would like to see home recording become a small part of that end. Just think of it. If everyone is able to record (or at least play) their own music, we won't need an industry to support listening. Music will return to it's pre-recording roots where it served a useful function. Today, it's simply fodder for our brain waves, a backing track for advertising, and a soundtrack for teen angst.

So in answer to the original post, "What do you do with your music," the answer is nothing. I create for the sole purpose of creation. I market to no man (or woman) because it's sound not soap. If I want to make money off a music, I'll become a bloodsucker for one of the hucksters who pedal shinny new equipment. If I crave attention or need validation for my creativity, I'll invent an elaborate myth depicting myself as an unrecognized genius who dies in obscurity, only to be discovered and hailed by future generations. Because, in the end, I know my life would look alright if I could see it on the silver screen--or perhaps YouTube. :D
 
Just curious what everyone does with their finished music? I work really hard on my recordings, I finish them, let a few people hear them and then that's really about it. When I was in my 20's I thought I was going to be a rock star and pushed really hard to promote myself. That never happened and I had to get a job. Now I'm older, I still love writing/recording, I just never really do anything with my songs when they are done. The other issue I have, is when I have tried to promote my music and get zero interest, I get discouraged. Or if I get negative criticism, then I get annoyed. Maybe I need therapy?

I've heard a lot about Distrokid. Anyone here ever have any luck with that?



Why did you make music in the first place.

If it was to make money then you have to keep promoting yourself and selling your work.
If it is a hobby then make a few cds for friends to listen to. Good cheap xmas present also birthdays yada yada

Everybody wanted to be a megastar and get filthy rich
but it is a very very long tailed phenomenon and most people had no clue what they needed to do
and if they they still might never get that lucky break to launch them

you may or may not need therapy

if you cant take criticism then give up
happens to artists writers musicians actors yada yada
and us soccer referees too:)
if you cant ignore the naysayers then take up gardening or something else

never heard of distrokid
but there are lots of those out there that make a bundle with the salami technique
again it is very very long tailed
a few do well some do okay most dont cover their expenses

there are lots of those kinds of scams out there ready to take your money to get you exposure
and they make theirs by selling subscriptions that your music helps provide content for
but if you pay anything for distriubtion do not expect to get rich or famous or even break even
 

dwillis45

Número sesenta nueve
if you cant ignore the naysayers then take up gardening or something else

Have you been on the gardening forums lately? They are vicious bordering on violent. Plus they have all kinds of tools that can do all kinds of damage. Never tangle with anybody who wields a weed eater. :D
 

dwillis45

Número sesenta nueve
I'm not sure which is worse, an internet filled with haters or a Pinterest-based world where it appears that everyone is talented. You can dismiss the vile misfits who cast dispersions on your sound or your music. They're hiding behind screen names and are hidden in some cranny in the middle of nowhere. On the other hand, try dismissing an avalanche of talent. That's what kills me. And it's killing America. There is nothing worse than knowing that you are average or even above average. Insert emoji where little green ball is hitting itself over the head with a hammer.
 

bainmack

New member
CDBaby for me. One time fee per album/song.
Primary reason is I don't produce enough music annually to justify a recurring annual cost.
 

agiledood

New member
Distrokid for 'official' band stuff and my personal stuff that I think is good enough, but mostly soundcloud and reverbnation for sure.

It's a hobby, as in part-time, for me now but in a few years I hope to get into producing, mixing and mastering full time.
 

BezowinZ

New member
Distrokid for 'official' band stuff and my personal stuff that I think is good enough...
I've been looking into similar services. I came across some info stating Apple Music has very specific mastering requirements. Does DistroKid provide that by chance, or is it up to the musician?
 

agiledood

New member
I've been looking into similar services. I came across some info stating Apple Music has very specific mastering requirements. Does DistroKid provide that by chance, or is it up to the musician?

You can "master for iTunes" but you don't have to. I mastered in Logic Pro X and bounced the tracks with the highest quality WAV format Logic could do. It's live on all streaming services now and sounds good:

Clever Weapon on Spotify

Distrokid says they do a bit and sampling check when you upload files to make sure they're ok but each service (iTunes, Spotify, Youtube etc) will reduce/increase the volume based on their loudness standards. There's a good guide here: Mastering for Soundcloud, Spotify, iTunes and Youtube. | Mastering The Mix
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
Distrokid is efficient and effective, but of course fairly expensive - but its does provide a route into the global market. Most of our music is created for clients, but some just for fun - and one of the guys here had the idea that normally our work does it's job, then just vanishes, so we put our old stuff out there and had great fun watching where it ended up. A bit of music composed for an exhibition promoting satellite downconverters, suddenly starts downloading in India? It's just weird. 800 plays in iTunes and Spotify and we've made the princely sum of $10. WOW!
 
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