Pro Tools Substitute

riqui.alves

New member
I've been using Pro Tools for recording and mixing purposes for over a year now, and got quite used to it. The program itself is very good in terms of workflow, the only thing I dislike about it is the outdated interface, but it's no big deal. The thing is, I use a cracked version of it; I intended to pay for it, but I just can't afford 30$ every month, it's a lot of money here in Brazil. As a result, I get a lot of audio driver problems and random crashes. That being said, I wanted to migrate to another DAW, one that I could easily get the hang of considering I'm a Pro Tools user, and that is more affordable.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
So what you want is a free DAW, as good as Pro Tools. I tried to compare the price so looked at a Big Mac - and the price of that in Brazil is very close to USA and UK - so I used that to put the price into perspective. If you want good software to do your music, it's going to be compromised by money - Music is expensive. Always has been, so I guess you have a choice to make?
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
The Reapevangelists are gonna recommend Reaper.
REAPER IS THE WAY!!!! Repent ye of the evil ProTools! 😁

For a real bargain, you can't beat Cakewalk by Bandlab. Totally free, so it's even cheaper than Reaper.

Reaper has lots of really good tutorials, so support is great. I haven't seen the same type of support for Cakewalk, at least not on their website. There are lower versions like Protools First but they usually come with limitations. If you never exceed 16 tracks, that might be sufficient.
 

riqui.alves

New member
So what you want is a free DAW, as good as Pro Tools. I tried to compare the price so looked at a Big Mac - and the price of that in Brazil is very close to USA and UK - so I used that to put the price into perspective. If you want good software to do your music, it's going to be compromised by money - Music is expensive. Always has been, so I guess you have a choice to make?
You need to consider our purchasing power here, not only the numbers. 30 dolars a month is around 160 reais here. I know I need to spend money, but Pro Tools is way more expensive compared to other DAWs.
 

riqui.alves

New member
REAPER IS THE WAY!!!! Repent ye of the evil ProTools! 😁

For a real bargain, you can't beat Cakewalk by Bandlab. Totally free, so it's even cheaper than Reaper.

Reaper has lots of really good tutorials, so support is great. I haven't seen the same type of support for Cakewalk, at least not on their website. There are lower versions like Protools First but they usually come with limitations. If you never exceed 16 tracks, that might be sufficient.
I used Reaper when I started mixing, and I didn't like very much. Maybe because I didn't understard anything about mixing lol, but I'll give it another try
 

Folkcafe

Active member
As a long time ProTools user, I recently returned to recording. My old rig isn't compatible with newer versions so I decided to look into other DAW. So I've tried demos of several. Probably the most ProTools like is Presonus One and it is fairly affordable for the Artist version. It was probably the easiest one for me to adapt to, the hardest being Ableton.
 

witzendoz

Senior Member
I have a lot of younger engineers come in and they all have had the protools brain wash, usually because they have been to an audio school. I then watch them constantly pay out for updates etc.

I just use reaper. Studio one looks good and I have had clients use it, I have also used Harrison MixBus which I really like but I had a computer glitch problem with my current computer, I may try Mixbus again when I do the computer upgrade.

You can't beat Reaper for the price.

Alan
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
My old way to assess anything was how intuitive it was. How simple was the design so you got clues as to where to look. The manual in online or printed versions failed years ago. Back in 1996, the Cubase manual was getting ridiculously thick so today’s would be impossible. In very real terms, you scratch the surface in a day or twos, the. You decide to progress with it, or not. If you take it forward, you probably stick with it. It’s the only way to do it nowadays.
 

CrowsofFritz

Flamingo!
My old way to assess anything was how intuitive it was. How simple was the design so you got clues as to where to look. The manual in online or printed versions failed years ago. Back in 1996, the Cubase manual was getting ridiculously thick so today’s would be impossible. In very real terms, you scratch the surface in a day or twos, the. You decide to progress with it, or not. If you take it forward, you probably stick with it. It’s the only way to do it nowadays.
This is why I like Reason. It’s built like you’re in a virtual hardware rack and mixer, and you can even turn the rack around and see the wires and reroute things by unplugging and plugging in the wires. As someone who learned with hardware (as most here have I imagine), that’s very nice.
 
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