New Computer Build Not Working

dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
I am in the process of building a new DAW and have run into problems. The build consists of ASUS Z97-a motherboard. Intel i5-4590 processor. 8 gb Kingston RAM (2 x 4 gb). Thermaltake TR2 700w PSU. 1 tb Hdd. Dvd burner. Corsair 300r case. Case comes with 2 fans, and I added 2 more. Dual DVI graphics card.

After assembling everything, I turned it on. It booted into bios, and recognized the hdd and dvd. So I shut it down to put the case cover back on. After that it would no longer boot. The Cpu fan spins for a half second, then stops. Nothing else.

I tried another PSU (500w) from a different computer that was working. The motherboard and the Thermaltake have an 8-pin ATX power plug. The second PSU only has a 4 pin power plug, but I believe it shoukd still work. Anyway, I got the same result. CPU fan spins briefly, nothing else.

Cleared CMos. Removed the graphics card and tried using the mobo onboard graphics. Pretty much the same result, except now the case fans spin for a moment.

I pulled the memory sticks and tried them in another computer. They worked fine.

Figuring it must be a bad mobo, I exchanged it. Same exact thing. :(

Other than a bad CPU, I'm now at a loss. Any ideas. Am I overlooking something? This has been very frustrating to say the least.
 
Hey man,

If you switched out the mobo, I guess that means you removed and refitted the cpu?
First thing I was going to suggest was CPU overheating from lack of, or too much, thermal paste but maybe that's ruled out.


Can't think of a particular reason, but have you tried booting with the case cover off again, incase that wasn't coincidence?
 

dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
Hey man,

If you switched out the mobo, I guess that means you removed and refitted the cpu?
First thing I was going to suggest was CPU overheating from lack of, or too much, thermal paste but maybe that's ruled out.


Can't think of a particular reason, but have you tried booting with the case cover off again, incase that wasn't coincidence?
Took the case cover(s) off after first problem and haven't replaced them since (since it's never worked again).

And yes, did remove and reinstall CPU. First time I used the thermal compound that was pre-applied on the stock Intel cooler. Second time I applied my own thermal paste. But even without thermal compound, shouldn't it run for 5-10 seconds? This cuts out almost immediately.
 
Took the case cover(s) off after first problem and haven't replaced them since (since it's never worked again).

And yes, did remove and reinstall CPU. First time I used the thermal compound that was pre-applied on the stock Intel cooler. Second time I applied my own thermal paste. But even without thermal compound, shouldn't it run for 5-10 seconds? This cuts out almost immediately.

Depends on how much or how little contact there is but yeah, a cpu could run for a little while then shutdown for safety, or simply fail.
It's a longshot, I suppose, but could the cpu have overheated that first time?

Failing that I'd just strip back everything. Remove all optical drives, hard drives, non-essential slot cards, limit memory to one stick, go with onboard GPU again.
If there's a header for external speaker, connect something to it. Maybe the mobo is trying to tell you what's wrong?

If you have the manual, there's usually a chart for 1 beep = broken, 2 beeps = on fire, etc.
 

DaleVO

Poor Farm Productions
Dach,
Another thing to check, with a good magnifying glass, are the pins on the processor. Make sure that none of them are bent. I fought that battle on an Asus ROG Maximus-beast that I built for my son. It had one, ever so slightly, bent pin.
Dale
 

dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
This particular processor has no pins.

image.jpeg

I think there are pins on the motherboard that line up with the contacts. They looked fine on the second mobo when I reinstalled the cpu.
 

DaleVO

Poor Farm Productions
If it's not a pin, like mine was, make sure the lock down is secure. I recall that the Asus CPU lock can be a pain.

Otherwise, Steen's reccomendation to strip back to the bare bones is a great troubleshooting plan. You had a lot of power hungry components installed that could be causing a hiccup in POST.

PS. Probably not causing your boot problem, but just a heads up.... I just read about a recent Win7 KB update that does not play well with Asus MoBos running Win 7 and UEFI. It essentially BSODs Win7 and requires upgrade to W10. Forbes Welcome
 
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BroKen_H

Re-member
The total lack of time seems to indicate a bad CPU. Replacing the mobo rules out BIOS. Only thing I can think at that point. Overheat would indeed take a few seconds. A dead short in the CPU would auto shut down without any processing. The case fan turning on might just have been random. Can you pin out the PSU? Get your multi-meter and check voltages of the leads...
 
"On-board there is a diagnostic POST LED, displaying status codes of the motherboard"


See if you can find diagnostic codes in your literature. It might just hold the answer or, at least, point you in the right direction.


 
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dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
The total lack of time seems to indicate a bad CPU. Replacing the mobo rules out BIOS. Only thing I can think at that point. Overheat would indeed take a few seconds. A dead short in the CPU would auto shut down without any processing. The case fan turning on might just have been random. Can you pin out the PSU? Get your multi-meter and check voltages of the leads...
I don't have any equipment to check psu. I have a home office computer that's a very similar build. It has the identical psu and has been rock solid since I built it. I could pull the psu out of it and try it in this one.

However, I have checked with an older power supply with the results.

But that all said, it does seem like a power issue to me. :confused:

I think the case fan had to do with removing the graphics card. Little less of a power draw allowed me to have enough initial power for a spin or two on the case fans.

For now I think I'm gonna exchange the cpu, since there's a 30 day limit on returns and I'm closing in on it. Also, process of elimination it's the only thing left.

The one initial boot still has me puzzled. It's like something fried at that point. Since I've tested the memory, tried another psu, and swapped the mobo, there's not much left.
 

dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
"On-board there is a diagnostic POST LED, displaying status codes of the motherboard"


See if you can find diagnostic codes in your literature. It might just hold the answer or, at least, point you in the right direction.
Not sure what you mean. Something thst doesn't require a monitor? Obviously I'm getting no display, other than that first boot.
 
It's on the actual motherboard. In the old days it was pigeons, beeps and morse code but, apparently, there's a proper LED readout on the motherboard.

During boot it's used as a diagnostic display. Once booted it reads out temperature, from what I read.

I don't know the details but I guess it'll show a certain number to indicate a certain failure.
You'd need to be staring at it as you press the power button - If it's shows anything it's going to be brief.

It's pictured here.


Also, remove all the front button/led header connectors, except for the main power switch one.
Would be annoying to find out a front LED was connected to the reset button pins or something. VERY easy to do!
 

dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
It's on the actual motherboard. In the old days it was pigeons, beeps and morse code but, apparently, there's an actual LED readout on the motherboard.

During boot it's used as a diagnostic display. Once booted it reads out temperature, from what I read.

I don't know the details but I guess it'll show a certain number to indicate a certain failure.
You'd need to be starting at it as you press the power button.

It's pictured here.
I haven't noticed it, but I'll take a look.

Btw, that's the Z97 deluxe. I have the A. That might be a feature only on the deluxe.

Edit: Yeah, just checked and no cigar. Must only be on the Deluxe version of the board.
 
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ecc83

Well-known member
Since it initially booted with the covers off check for a "case open" tamper switch. Might be stuck or wires pulled/trapped.

But ANYWAY! My gahst has rarely been SO flabbered to learn of an "electronics" builder without a DMM!

Get thee to a hardware store and spend $20..NOW!

Dave.
 

BroKen_H

Re-member
But ANYWAY! My gahst has rarely been SO flabbered to learn of an "electronics" builder without a DMM!

Get thee to a hardware store and spend $20..NOW!

Dave.

Yes, this...bit surprised by that myself. :)

Still, the check on the PSU was merely to be sure. swapping units will serve the same purpose. Still believe you've got a fried CPU, although the tamper switches can keep things from booting as well, but not sure you'd get any power to anything with those...
 

dachay2tnr

One Hit Wonder
Ok, duly chastised about not having any meters. :o

No tamper switches on the case. But I pulled the cover off and on, tried to start it both ways, same thing.

Pulled all the case connections off (power switch, reset, led's, etc). There is a start button on the board that allows you to start it without using the case switch or a jumper. Pushed it and got the same thing.

I pulled the CPU and will be returning it. Checked the pins on the mobo again, they still look fine. Stay tuned. :(
 
Shame about the deluxe/LED thing. Roll back to my original suggestion the and hook up an internal speaker to the mobo header.
Same deal - beeps = diagnostic codes.

I don't think I've ever used/needed a multimeter with a computer. :eek:
I do always have a bunch of spare parts, though.
 
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