How Many People Are Using Cassettes Here?

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
Threw out all my cassettes, and recorders years ago. Along with ancient computers that stored on cassette.
My DAT tape drive and all the DAT cassettes went too.
Then went out and bought a Yamaha AW16G to record music.
 
I have an audio repair shop that specializes in magnetic tape media and cassette deck restorations. Have had the business since 2009 having done over 240 cassette deck restorations. I enjoy the sound of a good working tape deck.
 

jamesperrett

Active member
I'm with Bouldersoundguy - I have a few stereo cassette decks here and a 4 track but they are only ever used to digitise cassettes these days.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I have my Harmon Kardon cassette deck. It rarely gets turned on. The rewind belt turned to goo, the drive belt is ok. Go figure. I looked at getting a new set of belts, but it seems to be a major pain to get the belt installed.

A good buddy has an old Nakamichi 700. Nice recorder, but I would rather just put things on a CDR and play it. Most of my old cassettes were really for listening in the car. Now I have a 32GB flash drive with all the music I want stuck in the console. VERY convenient! Who needs satellite radio?
 
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Chilljam

transitional phase
A lot of major label releases are still offering cassettes as an option for the consumer. Cassette releases have increased in the last few years.

There is a cassette label local to me that can supply cassettes, artwork and duplication services for quite cheap, so you can arrange your own independent release even if you're not signed to their label.

A lot of local bands (at least in Melbourne) have music that is exclusively released on cassette (vinyl production is relatively expensive in comparison, especially in smaller quantities). Super easy for local bands to sell their music on cassette at their live shows and much better source of income than relying on streaming services only.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Short answer: Yes.

Also, the name of the band I last bought on cassette. The album title was a zip code.
(y)

I had Rory Gallagher's Irish Tour 75, Jimi Hendrix Rainbow Bridge and a couple of others. I had way more 8 tracks than prerecorded cassettes but they all resided in the my car. Once I got a cassette for the car, the 8 tracks went into a box. I could dub my albums down to cassette much more cheaply and have a better selection.

I did listen to cassettes for albums that I played a lot, just to avoid the inevitable wear and tear on the records.

There were a few instances where I recorded a band rehearsal on cassette, but always felt the results were dreadful.
 

Pinky

and The Brain...
A lot of major label releases are still offering cassettes as an option for the consumer. Cassette releases have increased in the last few years.

There is a cassette label local to me that can supply cassettes, artwork and duplication services for quite cheap, so you can arrange your own independent release even if you're not signed to their label.

A lot of local bands (at least in Melbourne) have music that is exclusively released on cassette (vinyl production is relatively expensive in comparison, especially in smaller quantities). Super easy for local bands to sell their music on cassette at their live shows and much better source of income than relying on streaming services only.
Compact Discs are much more viable (at least some computers still have the ability to play them as well as any bluray/dvd player, whereas nearly no one owns a cassette deck anymore), and through services like Kunaki cds can be made for under $2 each. I'm basically a 'local internet band' and use Kunaki for cds and when they sellout I can always make more, or not.

The whole nostalgia thing will fade fast (it's already flatlined/stagnated), once people realize what shite the format is/was in the first place and run back to their superior streaming service mediocrity.
 

Pinky

and The Brain...
(y)

I had Rory Gallagher's Irish Tour 75, Jimi Hendrix Rainbow Bridge and a couple of others. I had way more 8 tracks than prerecorded cassettes but they all resided in the my car. Once I got a cassette for the car, the 8 tracks went into a box. I could dub my albums down to cassette much more cheaply and have a better selection.

I did listen to cassettes for albums that I played a lot, just to avoid the inevitable wear and tear on the records.

There were a few instances where I recorded a band rehearsal on cassette, but always felt the results were dreadful.
My primary uses for cassette were mixed tapes, garage band distribution, and 4 track recording. It served these needs fine at a time when there were no economical alternatives. But no one ever had any illusions about how god awful cassettes were. It was cheap, like a bag of Doritos or Snickers when you're hungry. It gets you by, but living on it will kill your ears. EVERYONE even remotely serious about music had their favorite albums on CD or LP/vinyl. As soon as CD playback in the car became feasible, shortly replaced by MP3s in the early 2000s, the final nail was driven into the cassette format.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
I have a Tascam 112 sitting in the rack - I serviced it and replaced the rubber last year - I don't think I'll ever record on it. Not because it's bad or anything, but simply because I now record to hard drive with one push of a button, or the same on a portable recorder. On a reliability front this is better. Audio quality is not necessarily hugely better, but magnetic media is naturally prone to issues, the machines need regular cleaning and it only takes a change in humidity to cause trouble. Analogue tape does do the job, but it's not better (sonically or electronically) and frankly, it is risky using ancient technology.
 

Smithers XKR

Well-known member
I tune them on the recording side to hit 22 kHz +/- 3 dB
The point is Clam if I may say . . Modern media supercedes old media and is easier and more convenient to use. But old media... it is more tactile and interesting and fun.
That is why people restore vintage cars. I have an old V8 Jaguar... would I swap it for an electric ? Logic dictates that I should .... but hell no😉🥰👍
My young nephews both go mad for vinyl now when they see my turntable and come into my music room.... they say wow! Uncle Stephen... you have an Atari! Retro is very cool these days but I dont care.
I am a vinyl freak and also a tape afficionado although not to your level. Vinyl requires little maintenance but tape media requires a lot I have a number of pre recorded albums on cassette from the 70's and 80's . After cleaning the heads on my twin deck on the home stereo with Q tips and Iso they all still sound great apart from a couple which sound dull. They were all stored safely away from magnets so I wont give up. I have read that the cassette tape might just be a millimeter out of allignment.
Thanks 👍
 

RFR

Well-known member
I enjoy recording music on cassette. Wondering how many people on this site are still using cassettes. If you are please share your experiences and what deck you are using

Paul
I have a Tascam 112 machine and another Tascam cassette/cd rack deck. Still use them both.
Good tape, good working order deck, and I’m able to get a cassette that sounds just like the CD I recorded.

I don’t see why the format gets so much hate. Works great for me. Been recording my own DJ playlist tapes since I was a kid, and still do.

And for recording, as in multitracking, it makes a nice hard copy back up of a mix.
 
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