Egg boxes - no, not a joke.

I have about 20 chickens and give away most of the eggs. A large box of stacked square egg trays can be bought online "cheap". ms
 

Folkcafe

Active member
I have about 20 chickens and give away most of the eggs. A large box of stacked square egg trays can be bought online "cheap". ms
Just under a sq ft each you can get about 250 for $80. I just didn't want to encourage anyone but it certainly would give out a retro vibe. I started in the 70's and have seen some stuff.
 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
I see no issues in trying things out - dumping them if useless and keeping them if positive.
This sums up my approach to recording, basically. Generally, what we give on this site is opinion mixed with advice divided by opinion and multiplied by experience.
 

Papanate

Member
This sums up my approach to recording, basically. Generally, what we give on this site is opinion mixed with advice divided by opinion and multiplied by experience.


Not exactly - it's not an opinion that egg crates don't do anything - it's a measurable fact.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
They didn't - but the point is nobody even noticed the change in design, construction and materials. However - remember that your 'fact' is actually incorrect. If you measure any material few are absolute reflectors of all frequencies in the audio band are they? Egg boxes, even the old ones do have a measurable absorption and reflection component. Tiny of course, but they do actually do something. In fact, they are actually diffusers in practice - so offering a distinct and measurable acoustic fingerprint. Please - before you explode, I am NOT saying they're good, we all know they offer very little - but can you be certain the new ones are not better? That's my point in starting the topic. Do new biodegradable and green friendly trays work as sound treatment to a degree that makes them worth trying?

Seriously = I thought about trying a wall in my video studio - but I have discovered a very important caveat - the damn things catch fire very easily. I guess the air trapped inside makes them pretty dangerous? I've not tried to test combustion on a Chinese foam tile. Maybe I should?
 

Folkcafe

Active member
They didn't - but the point is nobody even noticed the change in design, construction and materials. However - remember that your 'fact' is actually incorrect. If you measure any material few are absolute reflectors of all frequencies in the audio band are they? Egg boxes, even the old ones do have a measurable absorption and reflection component. Tiny of course, but they do actually do something. In fact, they are actually diffusers in practice - so offering a distinct and measurable acoustic fingerprint. Please - before you explode, I am NOT saying they're good, we all know they offer very little - but can you be certain the new ones are not better? That's my point in starting the topic. Do new biodegradable and green friendly trays work as sound treatment to a degree that makes them worth trying?

Seriously = I thought about trying a wall in my video studio - but I have discovered a very important caveat - the damn things catch fire very easily. I guess the air trapped inside makes them pretty dangerous? I've not tried to test combustion on a Chinese foam tile. Maybe I should?
Untreated foam is highly combustible. There was a local night club that had a fire from untreated foam catching fire in 2003. Killed 100 and injured 230 people. The band set off pyrotechnics and a stray spark set the foam on the back stage wall on fire. The club went up really quickly.
 

bouldersoundguy

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Untreated foam is highly combustible. There was a local night club that had a fire from untreated foam catching fire in 2003. Killed 100 and injured 230 people. The band set off pyrotechnics and a stray spark set the foam on the back stage wall on fire. The club went up really quickly.
Great White at The Station.
 
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