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Thread: Why canít I replicate the sound of commercial recordings?

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    Quote Originally Posted by famous beagle View Post
    Reading through this thread made me think of a video I saw recently that seems particularly on topic. I don't know if any of y'all have seen this yet, but I was pretty blown away by it.

    It shows one studio's attempt to recreate the tones on the Beatles' "Come Together." And it does by far the best job of it that I've ever heard.

    Here's the video:


    I understand this isn't exactly what the OP is talking about, because he's made it clear that he's not wanting to recreate a song exactly, but what I really like about this video is that they talk about most all of the facets involved, including outboard gear, instruments, mics (and mic technique), rooms, etc. Granted, they do probably spend the majority of time talking about the outboard gear, but I think that's most likely because this studio has authentic recreations of the some of the same preamps and compressors that the Beatles actually used on the track. So I think they wanted to show them off a little bit, which is understandable.

    But it's still a very enjoyable and educational viewing, IMO --- and even more so if you're a Beatles fan (as I am).

    What stuck out to me the most, however, was that, although they used all this period-correct gear (or expensive modern recreations of it) for the instruments and outboard gear, they still recorded it digitally and used Wave plug-ins to emulate the tape machine sound. I mean ... call me crazy, but I would think that most people, when asked what the number one difference between recording nowadays versus recording in the Beatles' day, would say "tape." So it's odd to me that they wouldn't try to secure a quality 4-track or 8-track tape machine, especially being the gearheads that they obviously are.

    Nevertheless, it sounds awesome, IMO, and it was quite fun to watch
    Hi
    really this video is beautiful frankly especially as you said: what I really like in this video is that they talk about most facets involved, including external equipment, instruments, pickups (and microphone technique) and I agree with you HostGator DreamHost Bluehost
    Last edited by drak00; 12-31-2018 at 07:34.

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  3. #72
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    listening to a remix White Album track, its really pretty sparse in overdubs but its so well done I cant help but think the tracking was so well done it made mixing, at least, a little easier.

    this certain tune only had a lead vocal....bass, drums....some piano and guitar filler....a few harmony/backing vocal. but it sounded loud and huge and just ..whatever you call it "commercial"? professional?

    maybe its the room too, large and high ceilings etc.... ?

    I suppose some genre's of music are a little easier, like a EDM Fruity Loops stuff sampled can sound much more commercial than the old guitar band stuff with live drums.

    imo, real drums are the hardest to match.

    if it's not happening in the room, it ain't gonna happen on tape.-H.Gerst

  4. #73
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    I FEEL you! I recently listened to a podcast thing on ways to get a sound you like and one of the tips was to choose 2-3 inspiration songs per song that youíre working on and drag them into you session. Then you can compare the parts that you like and draw inspiration.

    i.e.
    Maybe you like the structure of Mjís Thriller and the vocal editing of a recent DJ marshemllo song, and a specific synth riff from some random indie pop Spotify song. Well, bring them in to your session and analyze what you like.

    Another tip I got, was to pin point specific issues that you know for sure are not your strong points and carve out some time to really research, experiment, and learn what you need to know to be better.

    Iím not good, even though Iíve been doing it for 18 yrs, so I am going to try these tips out myself and see how it goes. Good luck to you! Keep on going. )

  5. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by famous beagle View Post
    Reading through this thread made me think of a video I saw recently that seems particularly on topic. I don't know if any of y'all have seen this yet, but I was pretty blown away by it.

    It shows one studio's attempt to recreate the tones on the Beatles' "Come Together." And it does by far the best job of it that I've ever heard.

    Here's the video:


    I understand this isn't exactly what the OP is talking about, because he's made it clear that he's not wanting to recreate a song exactly, but what I really like about this video is that they talk about most all of the facets involved, including outboard gear, instruments, mics (and mic technique), rooms, etc. Granted, they do probably spend the majority of time talking about the outboard gear, but I think that's most likely because this studio has authentic recreations of the some of the same preamps and compressors that the Beatles actually used on the track. So I think they wanted to show them off a little bit, which is understandable.

    But it's still a very enjoyable and educational viewing, IMO --- and even more so if you're a Beatles fan (as I am).

    What stuck out to me the most, however, was that, although they used all this period-correct gear (or expensive modern recreations of it) for the instruments and outboard gear, they still recorded it digitally and used Wave plug-ins to emulate the tape machine sound. I mean ... call me crazy, but I would think that most people, when asked what the number one difference between recording nowadays versus recording in the Beatles' day, would say "tape." So it's odd to me that they wouldn't try to secure a quality 4-track or 8-track tape machine, especially being the gearheads that they obviously are.

    Nevertheless, it sounds awesome, IMO, and it was quite fun to watch.
    That studio is the old Producers Workshop space the "The Wall" was mixed and some tracking done.Cool history.
    The Mastering Lab was in the same building.

    G

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  7. #75
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    Maybe for reverbs you can use the "Abbey Road technique (roll off lows and highs) and add predelay.

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