Yet another soundproofing thread: I'm under a music teaching room...

rgouette

New member
Howdy fellas... here's the deal: I'm re-inheriting a basement room that's approx. 10' x 11' +\-
Walls are: 79" from floor to flooring
Joists are 6" high

The room above it, is my wife's PIANO(5 ft baby grand) and voice teaching studio....(it's a carpeted 12x12 room)
And a few of my kids play often, so it'll be an issue at all hours.
My goal here(if at ALL possible), would be to limit as much of that sound coming from upstairs, as possible.
With my wall height, aside from stuffing some brand of insulation between the joists, is there anything else that might work?
Attached a pic of the ceiling

Appreciate any thoughts

kind thanks,
Rich
 

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rob aylestone

Well-known member
Get a mic - a condenser would be best, and with headphones monitoring it, touch the mic to the joists and the ceiling timber floor boards when somebody is upstairs. This will let you know if it's structural, leakage from the floorboards as in they are resonating, or perhaps gaps between the floorboards - as they seem to be old fashioned separate timbers, not any for of tongue and grooving.If the leakage is through the floorboard gaps, or the floorboards themselves a layer or two of sheetrock/plasterboard on the bottom might work, with insulation in the cavities. If the joists are carrying it - as in the piano is so heavy the carpet it's on has been permanently crushed, then the sound can be in the structure. Can you hear the piano loud and voices quieter, or do you hear everything at the same level? If it's in the structure then a room within a room would work better - the joists for this running up into the spaces between the upstarirs joists so the surface you see doesn;t make any contact with the exisiting ceiling structure - 79" is tight, but you should be able to only drop that an inch or two.
 

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
You're pretty limited here. You don't have the headroom to build a room within a room.
You should strike a deal where only one of the rooms will be noisy at once. Problem solved.
Other than that, try to decouple the piano room with extra layers of flooring. Hard - Soft - Hard - Soft etc.
 

mjbphotos

What?!?
Old construction there - 2x6s are not allowed for floor joists anymore, but those do look dimensional (actually 2" x 6", I had them in my 100-year-old house). Since you mention that the height is 79" - 6" = 73", you don't have room to add layers of sheetrock as a ceiling, nor would I recommend adding that weight to the 2x6s. As said above, you are limited and having an 'off limits' time when no one is allowed in the piano room is going to be your best bet. I used to send my (now ex-) wife out to the stores or movies when I wanted to record!
 

rgouette

New member
Old construction there - 2x6s are not allowed for floor joists anymore, but those do look dimensional (actually 2" x 6", I had them in my 100-year-old house). Since you mention that the height is 79" - 6" = 73", you don't have room to add layers of sheetrock as a ceiling, nor would I recommend adding that weight to the 2x6s. As said above, you are limited and having an 'off limits' time when no one is allowed in the piano room is going to be your best bet. I used to send my (now ex-) wife out to the stores or movies when I wanted to record!
lol funy
I suppose shoving rockwool, or some other insulation between the joists probably isn;t worth the expense...
I'll just deal with it, & worst case I end up having to mix with phones sometimes...not my favorite by a longstretch

Thanks fellas, for all the replies so far
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
I’ve done one room within a room where you might be able to sort the height. You put the inner room ceiling joists inside the gaps of the other one, that way you only lose about half an inch, plus the thickness of the sheet material. That might just be tall enough?
 
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