Yamaha THR 10 AMP.

Retired

Member
Hi,

I'm interested in buying one of these amps; I've got a new electric Yamaha YEV-104 violin due to arrive soon. Would this amp be suitable for my new violin in my small studio or is there a better choice please.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I played through one of those several years ago. It had some decent clean sounds, so it might work. A lot of the modeling was towards the crunchy distorted guitar sound, which probably wouldn't be useful for the violin

It has other nice features, like the ability to use with things like a phone or computer to give you accompaniment.

Dawsons in the UK had a pretty nice rundown on their Youtube channel.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
That's a nice looking violin.

I've never seen the amp, but just watched the video. The clean model and the effects would probably suit you most.
Sometimes you have to take a chance, and often are pleased with the result. A modelling amp gives you choice.
Those preset buttons are handy. I have 4 on my modelling amp, as a shortcut to my favourite sounds.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

Many thanks @TalismanRich for your reply and video. I've watched lots of videos but not seen this one finding it interesting.

I seem to be spending more time at the moment browsing studio gear; my lovely wife is just so generous spoiling me rotten and with my birthday coming up I'm after a decent amp; I already have a Laney LX20R amp but as soon as I plug a jack cable in it has a pronounced hum which is baffling me a bit and I can't get my violins to sound like violins being played on YouTube; at first I thought it might be choice of strings but it's already fitted with a set of strings at over £100 so I think the difference is down to the amp; I've so much to learn as a novice but I'm keen. The amp hum might even be caused by the jack cable quality but in my vintage radio restoration days I'd go around the chassis using an high voltage 0.1uF capacitor on probes to isolate it; I don't want to mess around and we can afford to buy the gear;

https://guitar.com/news/industry-news/dawsons-music-administration-job-losses-closures/

Is this the Dawson's related to the YouTube video; how sad when any business closes.

Thanks also @Slouching Raymond for your useful reply; it's always difficult for a novice to make good decisions whatever they are interested in and this music hobby can quickly run up a big bill.

I like the look of these Yamaha THR's and they are compact enough for my small studio so I'll buy one. I thought I'd ask first before jumping in.

My Yamaha YEV violin is to arrive Monday so Monday is set to be a brilliant day.

Thanks again.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I saw the news about Dawson's closing. It is a shame that a well established outfit with a long history like that would close. It would be different if it was a field that was dying, but music is still a viable business.

I actually got to visit a couple of Dawson's stores when I was in the UK back in 2000. I was staying in Chester, and there was a store not far from the wall near the Roman ruins. I spent a day walking the city wall, and stopped at a few shops along the way. (Chester was an incredibly cool place to visit). On Sunday, I took the train to Liverpool and did the Mathew St area, checking out all the Beatles stuff. There was a Dawson's between there and the train station. It was a really nice store, with lots of people checking out the wares, but then, that was 22 years ago. Things can change a lot in 22 years.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

Thanks for your reply @TalismanRich .
I saw the news about Dawson's closing. It is a shame that a well established outfit with a long history like that would close. It would be different if it was a field that was dying, but music is still a viable business.

I actually got to visit a couple of Dawson's stores when I was in the UK back in 2000. I was staying in Chester, and there was a store not far from the wall near the Roman ruins. I spent a day walking the city wall, and stopped at a few shops along the way. (Chester was an incredibly cool place to visit). On Sunday, I took the train to Liverpool and did the Mathew St area, checking out all the Beatles stuff. There was a Dawson's between there and the train station. It was a really nice store, with lots of people checking out the wares, but then, that was 22 years ago. Things can change a lot in 22 years.

I'm 74 and I've seen Great Britain in it's glory days of full production leading the world but now the only growth industry appears to be fast food outlets. It's a shame companies like Dawson's have ceased trading; the company I worked for closed its six manufacturing plants here in the UK and now the goods are manufactured in India on many of the same machines we used here in the UK then the finished goods are shipped back to a small distribution center; this company was over 100 years old. So many places I used to enjoy visiting are no more; NR Bardwell in Sheffield and Maplins now gone; mills and coal mines I worked at all gone; local scrapyards I enjoyed buying raw material from gone just a couple left still in business. It's all so sad.

Way back in 1961 I visited Chester Zoo on a school outing and quite a few years ago my wife and I used to have a trip over to;

https://www.mcarthurglen.com/en/outlets/uk/designer-outlet-cheshire-oaks/

With winter on its way again I'll be able to spend more time in my new studio shutting the world and weather out; I've so much to learn; in the meantime I'm gearing up. All being well I expect to pay for a second hand Yamaha THR10 shortly then this will be another useful addition; at the moment being a novice violin player I'm buying kit I think I'll need rather than wait until I know I need it; whilst the weather permits I'm very busy with exterior jobs around home but I practice violin playing at least once each day.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

Yamaha THR amp._0001.JPG

The first YamahaTHR10 deal fell through when the Gumtree seller messed me around but not to worry I bought the samr identical model THR10 and although used it's in perfect unmarked condition at just over £180. I've been using my Laney LX20R guitar amp and have never been at all happy with the sound; I thought the problem was my inexperience at playing a violin and however hard I tried I simply couldn't get near the sound I hear from violin players on YouTube.

I'm not only delight I'm absolutely over the moon with this Yamaha amp; whatever I did through the Laney it sounded so poor and brash; the Yamaha though has totally transformed my violin playing which amazed me as soon as I put the bow across the strings; yesterday I spoke to our immediate neighbours apologizing if my violin playing was too loud but they said they could hardly hear it but they cheered me up no end when they said they could recognize "Lara's Theme". It's so hot I'm unable to get into the studio but once it cools a bit I'll be into some serious violin practicing.

My new Yamaha YEV matched to this Yamaha THR 10 amp is such a joy and delight; no longer fed up of listening to the Lanery I'm now encouraged to do my very best and make some progress; I think I'll now sell the Laney having no use for it.


This guy is amazing and now I've got the same violin but with the Yamaha THR10 amp I've also got a Meris Enzo synth to play around with. I'm in for lots of violin enjoyment shortly.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Slouching Raymond

Active member
Colin, I'm glad your musical journey is progressing.
Having good quality kit that rewards you for just touching it, keeps you motivated to practice more.
I bought my first stage piano (The flagship Kawai MP9500), unheard, unseen, from a magazine advert. I found that whenever I sat at it for a quick 5 or 10 mins, I
would still be there enjoying it an hour later.
I try to practice my drums when my immediate neighbours are out. They tell me they can hardly hear it, but I'm still considerate.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

Thanks @Slouching Raymond Like you I want to treat neighbours with respect hence I keep all noise down unless I can't avoid it whilst working around home and gardens; I recently felled and logged 15 very tall trees using my petrol chainsaws but didn't hang around just got stuck in and did the job as quickly as possible; I fuelled both my 20" chainsaws to save time; chainsaws kick up a lot of noise; if everyone were like us the world would be a much better place.

I'd love to get into the studio and settle down but the sun is beating down and it's much too hot in there; we have 12" of loft insulation and I installed new Pilkington "K" double glazing units; this glass is wonderful; it keeps heat in and also keeps heat out; when it gets to about 6pm then the heat wins after the sun's been on the bungalow all day.

I've almost finished all the work I needed to do having worked flat out whilst this rare gorgeous weather permits; I was out early this morning painting woodwork and have just come indoors feeling overheated; just black gloss to add to the handrails and job done; new plastic post caps are on the way too; I've just installed new steps into the garden together with new woodwork; I also replaced woodwork on the steps I installed 20 years ago so fingers crossed I can complete the job early tomorrow morning then finally I can think about studio time; I've been retired 21 years but had little time to call my own; I've got a studio with some very nice gear waiting for me. The car's air conditioning compressor is now faulty but I'm sick of all these jobs always lined up for me it can now wait until next year when it gets serviced; if I run around to get it fixed then another job will pop up; enough is enough.

Aug 2022_0001.JPGAug 2022_0002.JPG

New steps and new timber top pic and new timber bottom pic; two coats of black gloss paint and new plastic caps for post tops will put this job to bed then I don't care what happens I want some studio time to myself.

My wife says she'd like to play drums but declines my offer to buy her a set; I have bought her a mini Yamaha keyboard which is amazing for such little money.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

1660549531217.png


1660549649596.png

This could be interesting; all replies are welcome.

We might need to learn something new @Slouching Raymond; if I stick with it I'll get there.

Welcome to the thread @Anthonyzok :thumbs up:

I finally got into the studio at 9pm last night after it had been like an oven again all day with oppressive heat and really enjoyed half an hour playing the Yamaha YEV through the Yamaha amp; it's highly addictive and with the forecast for lower temperatures shortly I plan to spend a lot more time practicing playing my violins. What a huge difference in sound between my 1880 German acoustic violin and this brand new modern electric Yamaha. At the moment I prefer the Yamaha because it's such a pleasure to experiment with and I like the sound better but I think as I gain more experience with my new gear recording and playing back I'm sure I'll fully appreciate the German violin more.

It's almost a year since I started playing around with my first violin and since then every time I've wanted to practice playing something has diverted me. I've been working flat out to complete all the jobs around home in order to gain some studio time; I'm now nicely set up with the new studio with lots of gear to get used to using; I've slowly progressed with violin playing and learning how to use the Tascam 8 track pocket studio; interface; amps and amplified monitors etc together with the Rode mic so I'm eagerly looking forward to a lot more practice soon; I can easily heat the studio with the central heating but not cool the studio down; here in Yorkshire we seldom need air conditioning but this hot weather is becoming more frequent; in 1952 as a five year old I remember playing out in long hot summers then in 1976 we had another hot period and now in 2022 another hot period; I hope I'm still around for the next time it's hot.

I feel a violin practice coming on so as it's a bit cooler this morning I'll wander into the studio before it heats up; I'm still trying to play Lara's Theme on my violins and now with the new Yamaha it sounds so different as to encourage me a lot more; I've not had time to try the German violin through the Yamaha amp so I might be in for a pleasant surprise. So much to learn but so enjoyable.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

It's just a year since my lovely wife treated me to a new Hidersine Vivente violin; ever since then I've had a huge struggle getting time to practice with it; always jobs pulling me away each job perfectly timed as one job ended another popped up each demanding attention.

At last I went to bed on 26th August without a job lined up; the day after was my 75th birthday and I was eagerly looking forward to playing with my now four violins and all the studio kit I'd been gathering; I'd also created a very nice studio to one of the rear extension rooms so I was good to go.

Stepping onto our patio first thing on my birthday I was distressed to find the two roomed extension had decided to pull away from the main bungalow rear random stone wall leaving an 1/2" gap to two outer and one middle wall; full length across the ceiling and roof joints; just how bad my luck can get never amazes me. Fortunately we're fully insured with LV Insurance; if it's a subsidence claim then there is a £1,000 excess to pay; I phoned LV and was informed I'd be put in a queue for at least 20 minutes so I hung up; next I filled in their online claim form stating urgent; I waited; waited and waited for a reply; then came Bank Holiday Monday; now I emailed LV cancelling the claim; I now received a rapid reply from LV asking me to confirm cancellatoion which I did; 0 out of 10 LV for your rip off; I was just thankful my wife and I weren't stuck in a brokend down car on the motorway hard shoulder.

I started repairs firstly to the easy outer wall which is timber; whilst doing the repairs I thought I'd get a roofer in for the roof repair; I emailed two local roofers without reply; I then phoned a roofer stated as one of top three local roofers and arranged for him to visit on Friday; he must be called Peter Brady because he proved to be the invisible man.

33 years ago my wife and I replaced the entire roofs to the main bungalow and extension after Legal & General refused to pay out when two ceilngs collapsed due to water ingress; we'd just moved in 6 weeks previously; the loss adjusters virtually told us to get lost it was due to lack of maintenance. We couldn't borrow another penny having stretched fully on a maximum mortgage; we lived with buckets and bowls for 18 months whilst we worked every possible hour in order to buy roofing materials; in those days we didn't have YouTube so I bought a book covering how to install a roof; we contacted Marley roofing tile company and they were excellent.

We took an extra weeks holiday at spring bank and between us we completed the new new roofs; the estimated cost was £6,500 we did the lot using top quality materials costing £2,400 and both roofs have never needed work until now.

I completed the timber joint to stone wall quite easily; next was a lot more difficult; the outer random stone wall had a gap from roof to foundation and in total the wall needed 6 areas repairing; I chopped out the damaged mortar which proved a real pain because in places it opened up the joint to the cavity. Two outer walls now repaired so on to the roof.

I knew the original undercloaking sarking felt was wearing away where it was exposed to the climate so I intended to sort this anyway so now the time had come; as I opened up the joint I was at first upset to find rotten timber expecting the worst; the wind had been blowing rain under the sarking now the sarking was worn; good timing though; the rot was confined to just one supporting batten; I visited Wickes and bought enough new batten for the entire extension roof length; back home I gave the treated battens two heavy coats of paint to fully seal it. Removing the rotten batten I was delighted I only needed to remove about half of it; when we replaced the extension roof all those years ago as I say we bought top quality materials and we used WBP plywood for substrate unlike the modern trend of using rubbish OSB board; the ply remained it good condition.

The new battens were secured with stainless screws and this time I didn't clip and nail the bottom row of tiles unlike clipping and nailing every tile when we did the roofing replacement. To make up for the worn bottom edge of the sarking I bought lead replacement this at 6" wide costing £88 and it proved perfect. Roof repair now also carried out.

Next I did the interior repairs. Total cost for top quality materials around £400 and it took two weeks working on my own with my wife as support supplying mugs of tea.

I've done many hours free work as favours for friends and neighbours but how strange they all suddenly disappear when I need a bit of help but it doesn't bother me in the least; in our 45 years of marriage we've done everything ourselves so we don't owe a single favour to anyone. In future anyone wanting free work; DIY = DON'T INVOLVE YOURSELF.

Roof completed_0002.JPGRoof completed_0006.JPGExtension damage_0009.JPGExtension damage_0010.JPGHeat damage_0011.JPGTerrible colour matching at B&Q (2).JPGWall to ceiling damage (1).JPG


Just a few pictures of the damage and repairs. From inside the extension we could see right through to the outside; we considered this an urgent insurance claim in case of heavy rain; now aged 75 I can still easily cope with heavy jobs but confess to being tired each evening. My finger joints have been stiff and my arms ached so it was difficult trying to play my violins but at last for the time being anyway I seem to have caught up; I feel fine and today I'm in for some serious studio time. My Yamaha YEV and Yamaha amp are just wonderful and I want to fully learn how to use both; I have a lovely German 1880 violin which too is a delight; I've got recording kit; amplified monitors and even a laptop; once again I'm back on track hoping nothing else gets in the way.

26 Feb 2022_0005.JPG

Here's another little job I did in March this year due to storm damage taking two very hard weeks working in terrible conditions in our steeply sloping garden; I felled and cleared 15 very tall trees working entirely on my own; having felled the trees and logged them working flat out to get the logs down to the driveway there wasn't the slightest problem in getting neighbours to collect the free logs for their woodburners; the trees ranged between lowest 50' and tallest 65'; I shredded the brash. As I stated earlier every time I've wanted to practice with my violins I'm pulled away; this morning for the first time I can spend a bit of time updating this thread. This afternoon is studio time.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Well done, Colin. It's good to be handy. Too many people have no idea what to do when things need repair, other than to call someone and spend a lot of money.

Masonry is one of the few things that I've decided are best left to others. This was never more apparent than when my brother and I built a block wall to replace an old garage door. Trying to be as careful as possible, we set each block and lined it up to the string. When it was done, we decided that the string must have been crooked. Otherwise the wall would have been smooth and straight. Everything worked and it's still standing 50+ years later, and the metal door we installed was perfect. It just doesn't look so pretty!
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
I don't have much time for insurance companies. They just look for an excuse why the don't have to pay out.
Extensions parting from the main house suggest inadequate foundations for the extension.
It may open up again down the road.
You're an amazing worker Colin.
My neighbours had a brick extension built this year, one foot away from the side of my house.
The builder had to expose my foundations, to lay their new foundations.
I agreed to it, because with care it woud probably be fine, but I think the builder bodged a few things.
I will look out for any cracks appearing over time. I took many photos as the work progressed, so have a record of what is where underground.
My sewer and drain pipes are now buried under their extension.
It really pays to be able to tackle these jobs yourself.
I'm sure the experience will make you enjoy your music time all the more.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
My sewer and drain pipes are now buried under their extension.
That's not a good situation. Just this past week, the local sewer department had to dig up my back yard because the neighbor's sewer line ties into the main there. They had to replace the pipe, so they replaced both the neighbor's and mine (they connect at the same place), and put cleanout access for each. That would be tough to do if it's under a building!
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

Many thanks for your interesting and welcome replies.

You certainly made me smile with your comment about "crooked string" @TalismanRich it's a corker of an excuse; the main thing though is you and your brother built the wall and it still stands 50+ years later; well done you could set a trend. Thanks; yes it's good to be handy; the only job I don't do is gas work; everything else I do with my wife's supporting mugs of tea. I wonder if anything else is taught in school these days other than how to use a mobile phone. There's too much easy money around making many people lazy and in order to save the planet we seldom repair anything this will also apply to electric cars once their battery needs replacing in years to come when it's cheaper to scrap the whole car than buy a new battery.

I couldn't agree more with you @Slouching Raymond I wonder if I'll bother insuring our bungalow again because it's a waste of money; car insurance is required by law though. Yes it's possible further subsidence could occurr at a later date but I'm ready for it; I've allowed for movement in the extension to bungalow roof joint; the walls being a bungalow are not too difficult to repair apart from being mostly random stone; the bungalow and extesion are built on clay and this recent extremely prolonged hot weather has obviously dried the clay hence the whole two roomed extension let go from the bungalow; I know the extension foundations to be solid because years ago I had to use a jack hammer to break through 19" thick concrete to access drains; this wasn't bad compared to when I removed the huge laurel hedge at the top of the garden wanted to install wooden posts and a mesh fence; who else could find a 36" deep concrete ledge just where the post holes needed to be; I really enjoy all this punishment. Thanks for your kind words; I've been working even before leaving school and going down the pit; I used to be out of bed at 5am for my paper rounds in all weather.

Fingers crossed your pipework and foundations stand the test of time but don't rely on insurance if anything goes wrong. My wife and I have saved a fortune over the years doing everything ourselves; we watch tradespeople at our neighbours these usually having a mobile phone to their ear whilst wandering around in the middle of the street; how they get anything done is a mystery to me because I always need to use both hands. Things aren't what they used to be; we're encouraged to dump rather than repair but then few know these days how to repair. I'm a dinosaur taught through a top class apprenticeship how to be a mechanical engineer; if a part isn't available we make it unlike fitters who only fit; I can make anything and repair most things even making machines from scratch.

Over the last year my violin playing has been more punishment than pleasure due to constant demands on my time; last night my wife and I were watching a movie on YouTube it having just one minute to go as the judge was passing sentence; there was a very loud bang just behind us; we think it must have been another pigeon flying straight at the glass; I couldn't see the pigeon but given the huge mark on the glass it must have hurt itself; like the extension breaking away everytime I want to relax something has me on my feet again; it never ever lets up but this morning I declared all out war and have at last enjoyed a full hour in the studio; it was wonderful and I'm about to spend the rest of the day in there.

I hope the repairs to yours and your neighbours sewers are fully sorted out @TalismanRich the reason I had to break through 19" thick concrete was to reach our buried pipework from the toilet; bath and kitchen etc; the low life builders who built the rear extension many years ago must have broken one of the clay couplings and their repair was to stuff the hole with supermarket plastic bags; I installed flood defences and replaced the clay pipes with new 4" dia plastic pipes. I bought a new cement mixer through eBay kept it 6 weeks looking after it then sold it on only losing £20 I never hire I buy then sell on then I'm not under more pressure to complete big jobs.

Hard graft._0005.JPG
As the years passed by water started to gather under the bungalow floor when it got to removing four buckets at a time in winter enough was enough. Water was gaining access at the wall to foundation joint so I repointed.

Hard graft._0002.JPG
Here's the repair under way; having repointed the joint I then made absolutely sure I wouldn't be doing this again. I bought a cement mixer and installed new flood defences; we have a very steep rear garden discharging water directly down to the rear of the bungalow. Here I've laid 4" thick concrete; to the right is to be added a 4" dia plastic soil pipe.

Hard graft._0003.JPG
plastic sheeting used as membrane.

Hard graft._0001.JPG
Any water getting into the new channel will harmlressly divert to a runoff to the bungalow side. Engineering bricks used.

Hard graft._0004.JPG
Whilst repairing the failed mortar joint and adding new flood defence cannel why not also replace the original clay pipes.

Hard graft._0006.JPG
Who would guess the large amount of work that had been carried out under the patio; when I do a job I spend a lot of time researching and dreaming up better ways if possible. Please note the exposed pipework; we used to have two clay hoppers for the kitchen & gutter downpipe to drain into but these used to stink and we're debris traps with lots of unpleasant slugs; here's my answer to the problem it being entirely my own idea and it works a treat whilst being extremely neat; we have an automatic air air vent located in the extension. Another big job sorted with my wife's support and only costing materials.

Hard graft._0007.JPG
35 years of hard graft never lets up living here; About four years ago when I was much younger aged 70 I removed a 60' long 30' tall hedge of mostly cherry laurel these were huge; here's one of the stumps I dug out by spade. I must have been a really bad person in a former life.

This morning I got out of bed without a pressing job hanging over me; I can't be accused of being lazy or hanging around; have I finally broken through after 35 years of non stop hard work?


Jobs done in 2022

March. 15 very tall trees felled and disposed of.

Garden bench fully dismantled and repainted.

Front metal railings painted with end secured to bottom flag.

Loose clicking flags lifted and re-laid on new mortar; done twice because of trapped cat.

Both garden huts given 3 coats each of BM paint (£300).

Dangerous steep flagged path converted to steps with new fencing and handrail.

Second but original steps; posts; fence and handrail replaced all painted.

Top meadow rotavated; raked and broadcast with new wildflower seed.

New middle meadow created in area now vacated by the tree removals.

Violin studio created and kitted out.

Serious subsidence damage to rear extension fully repaired.

More top meadow work as follows;

Buried brick & concrete pathway removed.

Full length top edge dug by spade to clear more tree roots; stones & grass.

Bottom full length dug by spade to clear lots of couch grass and more stones.

Area adjacent the conifer hedge rotavated and raked throwing up many stones.

Top meadow rotavated and raked ready for next springtime.

Front door and both garage doors repainted due to rare intense heat opening beading joints.


A number of patio joints re-mortared.

Rotten timber fence posts replaced with galvanized steel posts.

Top of meadow fence posts treated.

42' handrail to pathway repainted.

Full gardens & hedges maintained.

Howard Bulldog rotavator due as a winter restoration project.

It's now 24th September.

Can I now please spend a bit of time in the studio before the next big heavy job wants my attention. Just for interest and as a project I've bought an Howard Bulldog petrol rotavator which I'll subject to a full restoration this coming winter; I'll spend time in the studio and in the workshop. I'm always very busy indeed.

Enough of this it's time I got this thread on track as I gain experience using all the new studio kit. Thanks for your interest. :thumbs up:


Kind regards, Colin.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
Glad it is sorted, Colin.
My pipes are only 36 years old and modern plastic. The water company inspected them with a camera, before work commenced.
They ought to outlast me.
 

Retired

Member
Hi,

You can't be too careful with underground pipework @Slouching Raymond; you did the right thing to ensure everything was as it should be.

I broke clear of the 35 year ongoing jobs yesterday so at least for the time being I'm free. What a lovely day it was too giving me peace to enjoy a number of violin practice sessions; I don't go mad spending hours at one go but split the sessions into around an hour or less then have a break. The Yamaha YEV 104 & Yamaha amp have now accepted me as a friend and I'm making progress playing "Lara's Theme"; this is ambitous for a novice but I'm pleased with my progress and am getting used to the amp settings encouraging me to practice even more; I'm playing the amp at low but comfortable volume and am very impressed indeed; I also played my 1880 German acoustic violin and what a huge contrast; without the German violin hooked up to the amp via pickup I was very surprised by how loud it was; both violins are light years apart both so interesting to play. As winter bites I hope to spend time in the studio isolated from the world enjoying my violins and all the new studio gear; I've lots to learn.

I dislike the supplied chin rest on the Yamaha YEV so will look into changing it also so far I've not had any luck with shoulder rests at the moment I'm using a double folded towel on my shoulder so I'll look into finding a suitable shoulder rest; I'd like a shoulder rest which fully hooks over my shoulder to prevent it slipping down; I've simply not had spare time to do much in the studio.

I recorded a violin practice yesterday and will now try to copy it to my PC then if it sounds decent will post it on YouTube to encourage others of similar age to me to have a go with a violin.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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Retired

Member
Hi,

Back to normal with a burst bubble; into the studio at 10:50 this morning keen to practice; heating on; Yamaha violin and Yamaha amp pluggd in; Tascam set for recording; Rode mic phantom power switched on and at last nicely seated just starting to play; 11:00 called out to answer the phone; this time it was the vintage howard rotavator I've bought wanting a delivery date; normally things I buy are arranged via email but this is just yet another shattered concentration; I lose the will to live; so many demands on my time; home maintenance; garden maintenance people wanting me; I'm never bored I simply don't have the time neither do I have much time to call my own. I thought I was at last clear for some serious studio time but I can dream on; I've now switched everything off but dream of having another bit of studio time this afternoon.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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