Windows 11 compulsory Microsoft account

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
I just bought a decent looking laptop. Not for music, just general use, so I don't have to browse with my music laptop.
Lenovo Yoga 6 2 in 1. It can be a laptop, or folod right over to pretend to be a 13" tablet.
It may have a role showing a whole page of music score, to avoid printing everything out.
It could also be used to run Muse 4, while the other laptop runs the daw.
I am psyching up to the bullying setup procedure. Am not keen on Microsoft owning me.
I will read up online advice before firing it up.
Vendors always con you into signing up for services which are actually optional. You don't know they are optional when you fire up for the first time.
They force you to make decisions on things you've never even heard of.
I've just read that I may only need to set up a local account, which means I won't be able to use Edge, Skype, Bing, Microsoft's cloud storage, and other Microsoft services.
That would be fine by me, as I don't use those things now
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
One thing I found with my new Lenovo IdeaPad 3 with Win 11 home version: The Win 11 came in S Mode. MS says this is a security feature which, among other things, restricts contact with non-MS programs (can't use Google, must use Edge, etc.). I found it also blocked all updates from Lenovo. I was ok with just using Bing, but not being able to receive manufacturer's firmware/software updates wasn't going to cut it. So I turned S Mode off (once you turn it off there's no going back).
 
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arcaxis

Well-known member
In December 2022 I got my wife a new Dell laptop with Win11 that during setup wanted to have an MS account setup and was not letting me bypass it. I Googled some methods to avoid the account and found a method that worked by entering a bogus email address (no@thankyou.com) with a random password. Described in the link below.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I'll probably convert to Win 11 when they cut all ties to Win10. This laptop can do it, my recording computer is a Gen 4 Intel processor, so I'll have to do the hack where you bypass the TMP checks. Most likely I'll clone the system drive and try the update on the clone.

A friend had a computer that she was going to toss. I told her she should wipe the HD before she did that, which she didn't know how to do, so she just gave it to me. I've wiped all the data except the OS. It's been sitting for a year, and then I needed to use it to retrieve data from a laptop drive. Afterwards, I thought this might be ok for a Linux machine, so I got on Amazon and found a 512GB SSD for $30, downloaded Linux Mint and dove into the world of Linux. It took a few hours, found the drivers for an old 802.11B USB wifi dongle, and it's working fine for browsing. I use Thunderbird, so I could easily enter that data. I've got Chrome and Firefox. I need to get Adblock on there, though.

I'll probably try Reaper just for fun.. I thought about Davinci Resolve but it doesn't have enough horsepower to run that.
 

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
One thing I found with my new Lenovo IdeaPad 3 with Win 11 home version: The Win 11 came in S Mode. MS says this is a security feature which, among other things, restricts contact with non-MS programs (can't use Google, must use Edge, etc.). I found it also blocked all updates from Lenovo. I was ok with just using Bing, but not being able to receive manufacturer's firmware/software updates wasn't going to cut it. So I turned S Mode off (once you turn it off there's no going back).
My new laptop is Win 11 Home, and the sales blurb did not mention S mode, although other computers on the website admit to S mode.
In December 2022 I got my wife a new Dell laptop with Win11 that during setup wanted to have an MS account setup and was not letting me bypass it. I Googled some methods to avoid the account and found a method that worked by entering a bogus email address (no@thankyou.com) with a random password. Described in the link below.
I found a similar plot on a website, but the last thing I want to do is permanently disable a £600 pc by misadventure.
I've had a MS account for the past 10 years, so I just bit the hook.
I'm thinking about doing it, although I'd prefer not to. I am wondering if it means the laptop will not boot up unless it has an internet connection.
I'll probably convert to Win 11 when they cut all ties to Win10. This laptop can do it, my recording computer is a Gen 4 Intel processor, so I'll have to do the hack where you bypass the TMP checks. Most likely I'll clone the system drive and try the update on the clone.

A friend had a computer that she was going to toss. I told her she should wipe the HD before she did that, which she didn't know how to do, so she just gave it to me. I've wiped all the data except the OS. It's been sitting for a year, and then I needed to use it to retrieve data from a laptop drive. Afterwards, I thought this might be ok for a Linux machine, so I got on Amazon and found a 512GB SSD for $30, downloaded Linux Mint and dove into the world of Linux. It took a few hours, found the drivers for an old 802.11B USB wifi dongle, and it's working fine for browsing. I use Thunderbird, so I could easily enter that data. I've got Chrome and Firefox. I need to get Adblock on there, though.
I have the tools to clone a SATA 2.5" drive, but I suspect my SSD drive may be a little PCIe card, like my music laptop has.
Whenever I dispose of an old hard drive, I don't bother with wiping it.
I open the thing up and bend the steel platters into some artistic shape, with a pair of pliers.
Most 2.5" hard disks have glass platters, which you can smash into tiny pieces.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
I’m a little mystified by this. Surely, you just open a hotmail account and use that, so you have access to any updates? What’s the big deal here? You buy a Microsoft product but don’t want Microsoft to be able to contact you? Dump any junk they initiate and just forget it. I’ve got loads of throwaway email addresses that I use for this sort of thing that get redirected to my real mailbox, so I use homerecording@myservr.com as an example for a signup to somebody I don’t quite trust. Then when ads start appearing because they sold the address, I can switch them off. NOT signing up buggers the product up, so just use a disposable address.
 

Ujn Hunter

Active member
I think the biggest problem with having to have some online account with Windows 11, is that MS keeps expecting you to sign-in to the account with your email and password over and over again. I had bought an HP Laptop for my son for Xmas this year, and tried to set it up... but it wouldn't let me just make a local user account. Needless to say, I didn't give it to him for Xmas. Still looking for a way to use it offline without having to sign-in online to a Microsoft account to be able to use it. His Birthday is coming up soon, but probably won't be getting the HP Laptop then either. :(
 

arcaxis

Well-known member
I found a similar plot on a website, but the last thing I want to do is permanently disable a £600 pc by misadventure.
Nothing is disabled other than the Microsoft account. The laptop still gets all the updates and all applications that I've installed work as they should. The Microsoft store and othe MS apps aren't accessible, but neither of us care about what's there. On boot the screen comes up with my wifes name as the local account and no password needed the way I set it up. My other computers, including a new Win11 desktop are also setup up with just local accounts and no ties to Microsoft. There are occasional notifications/reminders to sign up for a Microsoft account, but not often. With Win10 it was easy to bypass creating an account, but Win11 gave more of a challenge and the bogus email method worked well. A Microsoft account could be added later if wanted.

 

arcaxis

Well-known member
You can use local account in WIn 11.

That article was back in 2021. Microsoft did some updates (Home and versions of Pro build 22H2 and up I think) so the method in that article may no longer work and no longer the option to do an 'offline' account. On the laptop and desktop I got in the last 6 months the only choice was a Microsoft account unless I 'tricked' it as I did with the bogus email and password as I mentioned back in post #3.
 

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
Thanks guys. This is all good info.
I got it ready for first boot yesterday, but held off. Maybe today.
Am considering whether to just surrender.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
My grandson got a computer for Christmas, with windows 11. I had to switch off mode S. He has a hotmail account, used that password and nothing nasty popped up. Deleted the rubbish apps that it had pre installed, and it was working fine quite quickly. Activated and done. Took me about 30 minutes to get him sorted and into his school system for homework and mails.
 

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
Am about to fire up the new laptop. Keeping this one online, in case I need to look something up.
Bought a 32G usb stick yesterday, in case it demands to create a recovery drive.
I used to have a good hotmail address, but they asked me to jump through a load of security hoops, then it never worked again.
I hope they give me an opportunity to create a new microsoft email address. Who knows?
The instruction manual for the laptop was just a scrap of paper, which just had diagrams saying plug in the charger,
and switch it on. My internet is via my phone hotspot.
Here goes.....
 

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
Well, here we are some 3+hours later.
Windows 11 seems to be up and running.
Here is the experience:

Switch on.
Some banners pop up on the screen in quick succession, with text to read, which I can't read fast enough before they change.
While I'm concentrating on trying to read them quickly, some 'woman of the computer' starts talking to me.
She eventually shuts up.
Pages of questions pop up in succession.
I select United Kingdom, and UK keyboard layout (I hope it is a UK keyboard, but haven't looked).
Enter my phone's hotspot details, and set it as a metered connection. So we're connected now.
Accept licenses.
Think I jotted down Name your device (can't read my own writing), but selected Skip For Now to whatever it was.
Let's add your Microsoft account.
I selected Create An Account, and selected a name for an @outlook.com email address, and picked a password.
What is your name?, gave them my real name (nothing to hide).
What is your birthdate? Gave them that.
Enter an alternate email address, to help you recover your password, etc. Gave them that.
Want to set up facial recognition? Selected Skip For Now.
Create a PIN, which only works on your device, not the web. Entered one.
Let Microsoft apps use your location? Selected Yes.
Find My Device. Selected Send only required data, not optional data.
Improve Inking and Typing. Selected No, do not use my diagnostic data to help improve the language recognition and suggestion capabilities of
Microsoft apps and services.
Get tailored experiences with diagnostic data? Selected Yes
Let apps use advertising ID? Selected No.
Protect your devices. Add this device to your Lenovo ID profile, for faster support, important updates, and access to exclusive features and apps. Selected Skip.
Let's customize your experience. I listed features used in Entertainment, Gaming, School, Creativity, Business. Selected all but Gaming
Use your Android phone from your PC? (I never told it the phone was android). Selected Skip.
Backup to OneDrive. Selected Only save files to this PC.
Access Granted!!! We're giving you a free trial of Microsoft 365 (30 days). Says Family subsription £79.99 per year.
I selected Decline, because I already read that an Individual subscription is only £59.99 per year, but they didn't offer that option here.
Get 100GB more of OneDrive storage? Credit card required £1.99 per month. Selected decline.
Your device comes with free XBox Game Pass Ultimate. Selected Skip For Now
Hi, getting things ready for you. This might take a few mins. Do not turn off PC.
Almost there.
OK, we're up in Win 11.
Looked in Settings, and found Create A Recovery Drive, clicked on it and got a list of instructions to follow, jotted them down.
Followed the instructions, and now believe I have a Recovery Drive on my 32GB usb stick. It requested at least 16GB.
Downloaded MuseScore, and installed it.
Will I be able to boot up windows 11 next time - Anybody's guess.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Yeah, it will boot up. No need to be paranoid.

BTW, unless you have a really special reason for using an official MS Office, I highly recommend you check out LibreOffice. It's free, open source and reads MS Office files. There are some operational shortcuts that work differently from MS Office, but once you learn them, you can still do just about everything, unless you are writing lots of automated processes with VBA. Support for VBA macros is not 100%.
 

Slouching Raymond

Well-known member
Yeah, it will boot up. No need to be paranoid.

BTW, unless you have a really special reason for using an official MS Office, I highly recommend you check out LibreOffice. It's free, open source and reads MS Office files. There are some operational shortcuts that work differently from MS Office, but once you learn them, you can still do just about everything, unless you are writing lots of automated processes with VBA. Support for VBA macros is not 100%.
I've had LibreOffice on my linux machine for years. I write all my letters on it. Solid so far.
I installed OpenOffice on this older laptop, and used it to edit a list of all the DVDs I have, so I can refer to it on my phone, in charity shops, to see if I already have a title.
Unfortunalely OpenOffice had bugs. For sure I'll put LibreOffice on the new laptop.
I've had to create an outlook.com email address, so will have to check whether I can access it without Outlook.
There seems little reason to subscribe to Microsoft356.
Paranoid is my middle name.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Here's one for you Raymond...

I spent the afternoon playing on the Linux system. I checked out Ardour and Reaper for Linux. Then I got the bright idea of going down the VirtualBox rabbit hole. I had tried WINE, but it seemed way too limited. So Oracle VirtualBox turned out to be a better "solution" for running old Windows programs (one of the things I wanted to learn). My goal was to get an old copy of Monopoly running (Win95 version).

VIrtualBox took some work to get the OS installed. I've got WIn95, 98SE and Me. The first trick was to download an image file of the Win98 boot floppy. Once I got that running, I had to format the C: drive partition. The first try was Win98. The problem is that standard video card is 16 color 640x480. Monopoly needs 256 colors. Tried SciTech's Display Doctor. No Go, either it did nothing or crashed the system. A lot of digging and a couple of attempts that failed finally led me to a VESA SVGA driver. In the end, I decided to go with the WinME version. It took 2 installations of Win ME to get one that wouldn't crash. I now have it running in HiColor in a 1024x768 window, basically what I had back in the old CRT monitor days. SoundBlaster sound emulation works, and it supports CDs. I can even pull down files from the network server! Floppys need to be virtual image files since the computer has no provision for a Floppy.

After about 4 hours, I was playing Monopoly. I've got an old copy of Risk I might install next. Loading up LinksLS might be after that.

I might go ahead and order that 8GB of RAM for $12. Maybe I can get Win2000 or XP running on it next. However, I will say that even though Linux is really capable and powerful, it's much more of a pain that Win 10. I haven't done any command line stuff is years!
 
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