which preset is suit for The Lettermen voicing?

sikamol

New member
I'm currently own Voice Works (rack type) and Voicelive 2. I'm amateur singer and I'd to know which preset is suit with The Lettermen style ? I would highly appreciate and thankful if anyone knows it please kindly tell me the preset number either for VoiveWorks or Voicelive 2.
 

CrowsofFritz

Flamingo!
You may not find any answers to this question. I doubt many people here are familiar with Voice Works and The Letterman.

Additionally, a preset isn’t the best way to go about it, IMO. You’re better off doing it manually to achieve the results you want. When I owned my digital pedal, I never used the stock presets. I made my own.
 

CrowsofFritz

Flamingo!
I've no idea at all what this means? Always keen to learn?
AFAIK, Voicelive 2 is a digital pedal for vocals. Think a digitech guitar pedal but for vocals. The Lettermen are a band, but I don’t know what their “style” means. I assume English is not this person’s first language.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Sounds to me like he wants to have the device do 3 part DooWop harmonies! That would be pretty good to have.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
Ah - I have a digitech harmony 1u rack somewhere - I bought it and never used it. You connected it to a MIDI keyboard or device and then one voice in got generated into a chord from the keyboard. Pretty clever things, but seems they've got cleverer. I figured Letterman was that American interview guy so figured this was to make your voice sound like him?
 

sikamol

New member
I've no idea at all what this means? Always keen to learn?
To make it clear. I an amateur singer, there a band name The Lettermen and they have three singer sings most of their songs in harmony style. The problem is I'm not a native English speaking but love to sing English song so it's hard to find group to sing the same style, then I bought TC Helicon (one is Voice Works and Voice live 2) I want these machines to help me sing a song in harmony for my pleasure and that's all.
 

sikamol

New member
Ah - I have a digitech harmony 1u rack somewhere - I bought it and never used it. You connected it to a MIDI keyboard or device and then one voice in got generated into a chord from the keyboard. Pretty clever things, but seems they've got cleverer. I figured Letterman was that American interview guy so figured this was to make your voice sound like him?
No, The lettermen is the singer band not David Letterman, not the same
 

CrowsofFritz

Flamingo!
The problem with the device is that I imagine the harmonies will be anchored to the pitch you’re singing. I just heard the song you linked and the harmonies are not always linear (I don’t know how to describe this). Basically if you sing an A and the harmony sings a D, each other note you sing will always have the harmony anchored to that many steps between itself and the note you’re singing, whereas the band you linked had different deviations in harmonies with each note.

Can someone else explain this in more musical terms AND more simply? It’s hard to do lol.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I've very familiar with the Lettermen. My dad had a couple of their albums when we were young.

Sikamol, why not just do the harmonies yourself? That's one of the fun things about multitrack recording. I love folks like the Beach Boys, Mamas and Papas, Association and CSNY because of their harmony work. Listen closely and learn each part, then put them together. Why have a machine do what you can do yourself?
 

sikamol

New member
The problem with the device is that I imagine the harmonies will be anchored to the pitch you’re singing. I just heard the song you linked and the harmonies are not always linear (I don’t know how to describe this). Basically if you sing an A and the harmony sings a D, each other note you sing will always have the harmony anchored to that many steps between itself and the note you’re singing, whereas the band you linked had different deviations in harmonies with each note.

Can someone else explain this in more musical terms AND more simply? It’s hard to do lol.
Thanks for your comment, let's see how much I can do because I'm not strong in music theory.
 

sikamol

New member
I've very familiar with the Lettermen. My dad had a couple of their albums when we were young.

Sikamol, why not just do the harmonies yourself? That's one of the fun things about multitrack recording. I love folks like the Beach Boys, Mamas and Papas, Association and CSNY because of their harmony work. Listen closely and learn each part, then put them together. Why have a machine do what you can do yourself?
Thanks for your comment. all the bands you mentioned were the hit one in my era. I'm just want to have fun when I play in my band or singing Karaoke for fun that's why I need electronic to assist me.
 

DM60

Well-known member
I think duplicating three voices will be very difficult. Using the effect you can try various different settings, but you will not get the same sound, you will have to accept the limitations.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
I've discovered mine is a TC Helicon - and the harmonies follow the chords you play on the keyboard, so if you play a C Major chord, and sing an E, the unit gives you the C and the G and one other - you can select if you want it over the top or down at the bottom. If you stop playing C on the keyboard and play A minor = the E you are singing gets an A and a C added. As long as you play the chord fractionally before you sing the note - the unit gets it pretty right.

I did this for you - sang the part (roughly, so don't shoot me) and played the chords to change the harmony - keyboard into Helicon via MIDI, and a mic straight into the unit. It does work but I didn't sing precisely enough.
 

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Felipe Carvalho

New member
Producing harmonies that are consistent with a particular band or style is the kind of problem that is more suited for Deep Learning AI, and I do not believe there is accessible technology to run this kind of thing in real time, for now.

The issue is that even if the device knows the harmonic context of the song, there are multiple ways to make harmony lines, one voice can be just sustaining the key root in a given section for example, another voice might be singing a different melody that is not precisely a given interval of difference, etc.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
In the example I posted the harmony lines do very odd things that humans wouldn't - but I guess if you are careful with the setup and understand how it works, they can work pretty well.
 
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