Use MacBook to convert USB Mike to 3.5mm Out ??

Petlyn

New member
Hi thanks for dropping in.

I have a really nice USB mike which I need to use for a Sample Recording. It was suggested to use my old MacBook (which I haven't used for MANY years) to convert the Audio from USB to Audio out which it does handsomely if I RECORD using Quick Time BUT what I need to do is to have the output of the MacBook, using the 3.5mm OP audio, into a mixer to allow me to ADD the Mike Channel as a separate channel but my attempts fail.

Love your thoughts on this before I go insane. Thanks Pete
 
Hi,
That's a long way around to get an analog signal and just getting an XLR analog-out microphone would definitely be preferable, for me,
but I guess you know that and that's not what you asked.

Apple has an app called AuLab which will let you do this. I don't think it's bundled with the OS but have a google - It's easy to find and download.
If you need help setting it up come back and let me know, but it's pretty straight forward.

Alternatively pretty much any DAW should let you go into hear your input back in record-arm mode with monitoring enabled.
You'd have to set up an aggregate device containing your USB mic and system in/out, though, and that's a little more complicated.

I'd give AU lab a whirl - Very useful little program.
 

Petlyn

New member
Hi,
That's a long way around to get an analog signal and just getting an XLR analog-out microphone would definitely be preferable, for me,
but I guess you know that and that's not what you asked.

Apple has an app called AuLab which will let you do this. I don't think it's bundled with the OS but have a google - It's easy to find and download.
If you need help setting it up come back and let me know, but it's pretty straight forward.

Alternatively pretty much any DAW should let you go into hear your input back in record-arm mode with monitoring enabled.
You'd have to set up an aggregate device containing your USB mic and system in/out, though, and that's a little more complicated.

I'd give AU lab a whirl - Very useful little program.


Well well EXCELLENT thank you especially for the ultra quick answer to my problem and I downloaded and have run/ran the program and in the course of returning to my windows machine (why do they call them 'machines' as there are little or no moving parts with SSD and USB's so it ain't a machine) I got loud feedback so obviously the program has worked and I'm very grateful.

Yes I agree a long way round a simple problem but I had a look on line for a simple 'device' to convert USB to 3.5mm 'with power' or at least a provision to plug in 5v but there's nothing available and a guy suggested I use the old MacBook which I haven't even 'switched on' for many years to convert the audio hence the question.

And oh yes I agree 100% the easy way would be to buy a XLR Analogue mike and have done with it but this microphone a Trust GXT 258 is quite extraordinary and I just love it. I recently retired from my professional studio which I had for 14 years (I am now in my 82nd year) and some of my mikes cost over 1K they probably cost 5 and sixpence halfpenny on eBay today. Anyway I thought I've spent enough so make do lad !!

I need the mike to do a sample recording to my Tascam digi as I play Sax and Clari and need quality plus versatility and now thanks to you I have it.

Thanks for you help VERY grateful. Pete
 

bouldersoundguy

<div><p>&nbsp;</p></div>
There's likely going to be some latency involved. As long as you don't need to monitor the mic live, it might be okay.
 

Petlyn

New member
There's likely going to be some latency involved. As long as you don't need to monitor the mic live, it might be okay.

Ah thank you Bouldersoundguy for your input I must say I never gave Latency a thought but on a short recording last evening 'Live' I did not fortunately detect anything maybe someone with younger ears may who knows, but the piece I played Besame Mucho required a little reverb so maybe that may have 'hidden' a problem, we'll find out. ??

Thanks again and Stay Safe.
 

Petlyn

New member
I was going to say...Turn down your speakers first. :P
Glad you got it sorted.

Hi Steenamaroo there were speakers on a test last night when I tested the 'works' but today it's going to be re-recorded and I shall be wearing cans.

By the way for interest to recording buffs a serious warning. 14 years in professional recording I have ended up with terrible Tinnitus the result of wearing cans and 'loud music' and it ain't fun, please guys do be sensible I wasn't and suffer terrible rushing noises in BOTH ears 24/7 and there's NO cure and it is NO FUN be assured.

Thanks for your input very grateful.
Stay Safe. P....
 
Sorry to hear that, Pete.
That's good advice, in any thread!

Regarding latency, AuLab should let you adjust the buffer sizes if necessary. I think it calls that 'Frames'.
If you're recording samples to use later then it's not going to matter at all.

If you're trying to record along to existing music in real time you might find you need to bump your recording back a handful of samples,
but probably not, with low 'Frames' settings.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
If you do any work for the BBC, their headphones all have internal or fixed in-line protection now. The trouble is the UK rule on noise exposure at work is determined by shift length, so somebody working with headphones on for 8 hours has very, very low volume. In fact, so low it's impossible to mix as ambient noises can be louder than open back headphone volume, and closed back designs are horrible for all day working and also let you even hear body sounds through bone conduction.

The musicians union her offered subsidised hearing protection for their members and especially musicians in pits in theatres - where space is always tight and some poor devil sits with the trumpets! Part of my job was to give musicians hearing protection if they did not have any of their own, and I thought I'd have a problem - but they liked the idea having understood it really was protection to keep a career going longer. Ironically - what actually happened is that the extra isolation meant they could all play louder. The trumpets and saxes could really give it extra welly - so when the music says FF, we got FFF! Plus - grinning musos, with protected volume - and everyone else going mad. The sound man with faders he kept on zero, no need for extra volume for the first time.

When my band switched to in ears - I loved them, because I could finally turn the volume down, and really hear properly. Dump those huge wedges that had to be louder than everything else. Hearing, once gone is tragic!
 

Petlyn

New member
Sorry to hear that, Pete.
That's good advice, in any thread!

Regarding latency, AuLab should let you adjust the buffer sizes if necessary. I think it calls that 'Frames'.
If you're recording samples to use later then it's not going to matter at all.

If you're trying to record along to existing music in real time you might find you need to bump your recording back a handful of samples,
but probably not, with low 'Frames' settings.

I HAVE to say before I say ANYTHING, fantastic Cover Versions WELL DONE quite amazing you've done well !!

I feel I MAY have to trouble you with AuLab as now and again when I come to use it it does not respond and I've got to reboot the ole Mac and try again. Maybe there's something missing in the comp a driver or summat that's required to get it responding 100%. What happens is I see activity on the display in/out fine but no actual output. Perhaps it has to be setup 'properly' but I'm too old to read instructions, talking is a struggle and breathing these days oh dear, don't get old whatever you do it just ain't nice.

Yes I am recording in real time that's the aim.

Thanks for your trouble. Pete
 

Petlyn

New member
If you do any work for the BBC, their headphones all have internal or fixed in-line protection now. The trouble is the UK rule on noise exposure at work is determined by shift length, so somebody working with headphones on for 8 hours has very, very low volume. In fact, so low it's impossible to mix as ambient noises can be louder than open back headphone volume, and closed back designs are horrible for all day working and also let you even hear body sounds through bone conduction.

The musicians union her offered subsidised hearing protection for their members and especially musicians in pits in theatres - where space is always tight and some poor devil sits with the trumpets! Part of my job was to give musicians hearing protection if they did not have any of their own, and I thought I'd have a problem - but they liked the idea having understood it really was protection to keep a career going longer. Ironically - what actually happened is that the extra isolation meant they could all play louder. The trumpets and saxes could really give it extra welly - so when the music says FF, we got FFF! Plus - grinning musos, with protected volume - and everyone else going mad. The sound man with faders he kept on zero, no need for extra volume for the first time.

When my band switched to in ears - I loved them, because I could finally turn the volume down, and really hear properly. Dump those huge wedges that had to be louder than everything else. Hearing, once gone is tragic!

Oh Rob how times have changed with todays "Health and Safety". I was in the game for 14 years but that was over 10 years ago almost 11. In those days Health and Safety what's that ? The trouble was always 'hearing the Bass' you could see it fine on the mix but the lads always wanted to 'hear it' not 'feel' it so the fone volume goes up and that's it your buggered "what was that you said can't hear you for this ringing", not recommended and I'm pleased they have such protection nowadays that's great.

Until the Pandemic I played violin in several orchestras and Sax and Clari in two bands so I know what you mean about giving it extra 'welly' one orchestra I play in I am seated first violin section but at the rear and have 4 horns blasting me off my seat, fortunately on complaint they have provided screens to 'reduce' the pressure on my ears which certainly helps. The bands are OK as we all 'give it welly' all the time anyway so ear plugs are on the menu !! Can't wait to get back to music !

Thanks again for your input Rob. Pete
 
Thanks for listening, and for the kind comments! :) Glad you enjoyed them.
There are different versions of AuLab for different operating systems. Maybe there's a better suited version than the one you have?

I use it weekly for a group voice chat that I have without issue - You can save profiles in it, and then load them again, which saves the hassle of setting up the ins and outs every time you want to use it.

You should be able to do force-quit if it freezes (Apple button..top left -> Force Quit, or cmd+alt+esc),
but with the correct version it shouldn't freeze.
 

Petlyn

New member
Thanks I'll see if there is a different version just in case. And thanks for the command to unfreeze but better if it didn't ! THANKS AGAIN P....
 
Top