'The Box' and me are not friends

Slouching Raymond

Active member
I have had a falling out with 'the box'.
The very reason I came here in the first place was trouble with Cubase 11.
After following some good suggestions, it worked again.
Now it is not working again, with the same fault.
So, I'm not going to chase it any more. Just write it off.
My recording gear is the trusty Yamaha AW16G once again, for now.
I am looking at getting the Tascam DP32SD, which looks like an upgrade from the AW16G, as it has 8 mono and 12 stereo channels.
Real knobs, real buttons, and real faders, and just the fun of making music, without fighting computers.
The Tascam is a few years old now, but I have not read a bad review.
 

RFR

Well-known member
I know very little about these other than bring digital porta studios. The new models caught my eye, just because of the familiarity to old school Tascam stuff.

Anyway here’s a video comparing e we it’s the DP
 
I have had a falling out with 'the box'.
The very reason I came here in the first place was trouble with Cubase 11.
After following some good suggestions, it worked again.
Now it is not working again, with the same fault.
So, I'm not going to chase it any more. Just write it off.
My recording gear is the trusty Yamaha AW16G once again, for now.
I am looking at getting the Tascam DP32SD, which looks like an upgrade from the AW16G, as it has 8 mono and 12 stereo channels.
Real knobs, real buttons, and real faders, and just the fun of making music, without fighting computers.
The Tascam is a few years old now, but I have not read a bad review.
I love my Tascam 2488. Real faders knobs etc. it’s digital but the flow is analog. But it’s going on 20 years old. Jeez where does the time go?
 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
I love my Tascam 2488. Real faders knobs etc. it’s digital but the flow is analog. But it’s going on 20 years old. Jeez where does the time go?
I'm the same with my Akai DPS12i. 95% of my workflow was developed in my analog days and I've long felt that there's nothing that could be done in the digital realm that couldn't be done with tape. It's just that digital is much more convenient and quicker. I suppose some would say it's made me lazy or less of a craftsperson, but I don't care. My philosophy is that "digital is my razor blade." That used to be my strap line here. I may get that printed onto a T shirt !
 

jamesperrett

Active member
I've been helping someone out with one of the new Tascam mixer/recorders - in this case the Model 12. Their recording functions aren't very comprehensive and the person I was helping (who has used a variety of Tascam recorders in the past) was very disappointed with it because it was a step back compared to what she was used to.

If you are happy with basic multitrack recording functions then they will probably be fine - they are really just an analogue mixer with a basic recorder tacked on.

Also be very wary of some of the YouTube videos on these Tascam recorders. There are some that will lead you completely up the garden path because the creator has absolutely no idea how to use the gear.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I think the purpose of the Model 12/24 style is different from the DP24/32 models. The former seem to be designed for live mixer use, especially with the EQ knobs, faders, compressors, aux and monitor sends. The recording portion is to allow easy recording of live shows, where you can feed things to the board, just like the big boys do, and get tracks that are easily used for mixing down shows.

The DP series is better suited for home recording where you have more effect, routing, etc, but not as well set up as a "live mixer" for a band.

WIth both you can "record". They just have different target audiences.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
I just happen to have a copy of SoundOnSound, containing a review of the model 12. The 12 has more features than the older 24.
It tries to be all things to all people:
Stand alone mixer for live use, with all tracks recording too.
Studio multitracking recorder, although I can see the limitations.
Simple control surface for a daw. (The AW16G does that)

I did watch one video where the woman didn't understand what the phantom switches were for, or the difference between the master fader and the overall volume knob.
Another one was a man who had a DP for years, but hadn't really used it yet, and played us a first recording.

Rich is right, the DP32SD is a different animal, being a digital mixer, packed with DSP. I understand it is the pinacle of portastudios, and we should be greatful that Tascam have kept the product line going, whereas Korg ditched it. It is not perfect, having 45mm faders, and they removed the CD writer and the midi connectors, but what is there looks useful to me.
My Korg D16XD is too big to fit in my recording spaces. The AW16G has just 4 stereo tracks, compared to 12 on the DP, but the DP appears to operate much like the AW16G. The AW16G has 24-bit A/Ds, but actually only records as 16 bit. The DP talks of 16/24 bit, but I don't know if there's a track count trade off if you use 24bit.
16 bit recording is probably adequate for making amateur demo recordings.

As for Cubase 11, I was getting the message "Too many tracks recording", when I just tried to record 1 track. Same as my original posts, but I previously fixed that
by changing the SSD drive, and that worked for a while, until now. Cubase only cost me £80, and I'm tired of jumping through hoops to get it to work.
Maybe I'll try a different DAW. I could download the Pro Tools demo, or maybe Reaper. Whichever doesn't give me grief will get my vote.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
Have just watched the above video.
The major negative for the DP is the dodgy buttons.
That's not a show stopper. The functionality is there.
I would open it up, take it to bits and find out why they're dodgy.
Even so, the guy still swore by the DP.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
I just happen to have a copy of SoundOnSound, containing a review of the model 12. The 12 has more features than the older 24.
It tries to be all things to all people:
Stand alone mixer for live use, with all tracks recording too.
Studio multitracking recorder.
Simple control surface for a daw. (The AW16G does that)

I did watch one video where the woman
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
As for Cubase 11, I was getting the message "Too many tracks recording", when I just tried to record 1 track. Same as my original posts, but I previously fixed that
by changing the SSD drive, and that worked for a while, until now. Cubase only cost me £80, and I'm tired of jumping through hoops to get it to work.
Maybe I'll try a different DAW. I could download the Pro Tools demo, or maybe Reaper. Whichever doesn't give me grief will get my vote.
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
Well that is an odd one. I assume you have Cubase Artist which is limited in tracks, but it doesn't make sense if you only had one track recording. Also odd is that the changing of the drive running it would make a difference. Are you speaking of the drive your OS and Cubase are on, or are you using a separate drive for recording to? I am concerned that if you are using the same drive to run cubase, and recording to the same drive, that you can have issues like this for any DAW. Is it a laptop? PC or Mac?
 

PorterhouseMusic

Active member
I absolutely love my DP-32SD. I have for 7 years. It is an *excellent* recording device. There are a couple of minor caveats to sidestep operational issues - but once you understand those - the sky is the limit.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
Well that is an odd one. I assume you have Cubase Artist which is limited in tracks, but it doesn't make sense if you only had one track recording. Also odd is that the changing of the drive running it would make a difference. Are you speaking of the drive your OS and Cubase are on, or are you using a separate drive for recording to? I am concerned that if you are using the same drive to run cubase, and recording to the same drive, that you can have issues like this for any DAW. Is it a laptop? PC or Mac?
It is Cubase 11 Elements, for which I think they allow you 24 tracks. I was pointed at Cubase Help, where I entered the error message. Near the top of the list of results was a suggestion that the Drive could be on the way out. Although brand new, I swapped it for a different make (also brand new). That fixed it - Great. Until now, when that same error message comes up. It was a new Quad core i5 laptop, which accommodates a second SSD drive, which I dedicate to project data. The only thing on the main SSD drive is applications.
 
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