Songwriters: Do you still like your music?

BroKen_H

Re-member
I've written a lot of songs. A lot of them never made it to "tape". Some of them have. The ones that have are some of my favorite music. It's odd to me that I love my music even though I don't like my voice much, or a lot of my playing. Some of my production on the first two EPs were (was?) actually quite embarrassing...but I still love the songs. I've heard other people say they're tired of their song (or sick of or whatever). I never get tired of hearing what I've put "in the box".

My two 5 song EPs and this year's 12 song release are some of my favorite music. Each has flaws and strengths. Each song that I record and mess with makes my skills set that much stronger.

It's a progression that I like to hear frequently. I have a playlist with all 10 songs from the first two EPs and seven of the new project that I listen to EVERY morning. There are a few of those first 10 songs that I've got issues with (like any love). But, I can't see changing what's been done. Maybe in a few years if I get really good at mixing/production I'll revisit some of them. I DO have my favorites, and the first song I wrote (back in 91, but not recorded till 2014 still holds a special place. Every time I start to hear it, I think, "I could make this better." But then I just leave it, because I've grown to love it as is, flaws and all.

Anyway, that's me. How do you feel about YOUR music.
 

easlern

Boredom artist
I'm still trying to get my taste and my songwriting to agree. I can't tell you why I write folk when I don't even listen to it lol

I listen to stuff I did and I'll be like, "wow cool", so I think I like it. But it's not replacing my playlists, I listen to other people 99% of the time. Maybe it's like tickling yourself, it just doesn't work for me.
 

Robus

New member
I do. By the time a song is finished, I'm usually pretty sick of it. I like to give it a rest for a few weeks or months before listening again.
 

Chili

Site Moderator
I like to listen to my last 2 CD's. I think being intimately familiar with every aspect has an appeal and so it becomes more than just listening.

Sometimes, I go way back to songs I wrote when I first started writing and recording. 10 years ago or so. Some are just plain horrible, but there are some where I think I'd like to re-record now that I have a better idea of what I'm doing.
 

Illsidgus

Desiccated Member
I still like most of my songs, but I would never play them for anyone now. For that matter, a lot of my music hasn't been heard by anyone since the 1980s and for some, the 1970s. I am getting ready to record some fairly new stuff that I wrote in 2005.
 

VomitHatSteve

Hat STYLE. Not contents.
Your stuff is pretty danged good. There's that difference between ego and self-worth, eh?
That's what I tell myself at least! :D
I like to listen to my last 2 CD's. I think being intimately familiar with every aspect has an appeal and so it becomes more than just listening.

Sometimes, I go way back to songs I wrote when I first started writing and recording. 10 years ago or so. Some are just plain horrible, but there are some where I think I'd like to re-record now that I have a better idea of what I'm doing.

I tend to do that too. I'm always pretty happy with my most recent two projects, but any older than that I find embarrassing.

Weirdly, I've been doing this long enough that I'm starting to like some of my old, terrible recordings again.
 

witm8

Member
I'm still trying to get my taste and my songwriting to agree. I can't tell you why I write folk when I don't even listen to it lol

I listen to stuff I did and I'll be like, "wow cool", so I think I like it. But it's not replacing my playlists, I listen to other people 99% of the time. Maybe it's like tickling yourself, it just doesn't work for me.

Oh man, bang on with that comment !! I'm doing it all the damn time. I get this urge to write a song, get a little bit hyped up - then end up with some wishy-washy namby-pamby middle of the road folk thing. I even bore myself when listening to it back.

So I scrap it - start again - and hey presto - another bloody folk song has appeared.

I guess it's just because it's (not wanting to offend any folkies out there) a bit simple, standard chord progressions, and strumming patterns :confused:
 

BroKen_H

Re-member
I get this, too. I start a song out in my head. It sounds very full and country swing sort of thing. The next thing I know, I've got the Metalhead amp out and 6 channels of kick...scrap.
I've got this lovely piano piece that just needs some bass and strings and then I listen to it a couple hours later and there's a monster complexity of tangled parts...(sometimes I keep those). :)
 

easlern

Boredom artist
a bit simple, standard chord progressions, and strumming patterns :confused:

I think you're exactly right, it's not even a knock on the music really, I think the lyrics and emotion are the focus in folk. It does get monotonous if you're not mindful though. I'm not a fantastic guitarist so I tend to use similar patterns/changes on everything, it takes an effort to keep things fresh.
 

andrushkiwt

Well-known member
...country swing sort of thing. The next thing I know, I've got the Metalhead amp out and 6 channels of kick...

sounds like you're describing the recent clinic track :) the blues base but with a metal twist one?

To answer the thread - Since I started mixing my own crap, I never listen to the radio or anything anymore unless the gf has control of the dial in the car. If I do, it's only to reference sounds (30STM, My Chemical Romance, Anberlin, Breaking Benjamin). The song "Helena" by MCR, however, I can ALWAYS get into. And any Nirvana song.

But my own, I guess I still like it. I go in phases where I think it's really good, then for a week I'll think it sucks badly, then back to the first... repeat over and over. Ah, the life and mind of the songwriter. lol.
 

fat_fleet

Swollen Member
I guess it's just because it's (not wanting to offend any folkies out there) a bit simple, standard chord progressions, and strumming patterns :confused:

I think you're exactly right, it's not even a knock on the music really, I think the lyrics and emotion are the focus in folk. It does get monotonous if you're not mindful though. I'm not a fantastic guitarist so I tend to use similar patterns/changes on everything, it takes an effort to keep things fresh.

It's funny to hear someone say that, because I *do* listen to *some* folk related stuff, and one of my favorite things about it is the dense and nuanced approach to instrumentation.. but I suppose if you're not a fan, what would even motivate you to dig deeper than the caricature of a "folk type song" that gets slapped on a Target commercial or Simpsons episode?
 
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Robus

New member
I get this, too. I start a song out in my head. It sounds very full and country swing sort of thing. The next thing I know, I've got the Metalhead amp out and 6 channels of kick...scrap.
I've got this lovely piano piece that just needs some bass and strings and then I listen to it a couple hours later and there's a monster complexity of tangled parts...(sometimes I keep those). :)

This might be related to what we were discussing on the other thread. When you are struggling for lyrics or vocal melody, ever tempted to overdub another guitar part instead? That's how it happens. I have to stop myself all the time. I say to myself: nope, not doing another thing with this song until I have melody and lyrics.
 

easlern

Boredom artist
It's funny to hear someone say that, because I *do* listen to *some* folk related stuff, and one of my favorite things about it is the dense and nuanced approach to instrumentation.. but I suppose if you're not a fan, what would even motivate you to dig deeper than the caricature of a "folk type song" that gets slapped on a Target commercial or Simpsons episode?

Sorry to personally insult you bud
 
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