Restoring Vintage Analog Media (disc/tape)

Lt. Bob

Spread the Daf!
pretty interesting stuff.
A note though .... as a confirmed vinyl maniac, linear tracking tables are horrible. The theoretical advantage of having no tracking error is WAY outweighed by the issues caused by servos constantly 'hunting and seeking' the proper place in the groove. The sound of a good pivoting arm is virtually always much better if the overhang has been set up properly.

But that's just an observation ....... nice of you to provide such information.
 
Like LT Bob I'll make a comment or two re the section about tapes.

Very few cassette or reel machines have a "head height" screw as such. Usually changing head height involves at least two screws and often three, all adjusted precisely the same amount so as not to affect other head angles such as azimuth, tilt etc.
The classic Nakamichi decks do have a head height screw but even then it interacts with the azimuth adjustment and so you have to re adjust azimuth each time you move head height.

Adjusting azimuth doesnt normally affect overall level on the VU meter. Changing head height does.
Similarly, changing head height doesnt affect the highs but the overall level.
I think you had the two effects reversed.

Also, if one was adjusting those two parameters on say a Nak, head height should be done first and then azimuth corrected after, and each time height was changed.
In any case, changing head height would be beyond the realm of most users and would probably be better left unaltered unless it was known to be wrong.

It's also true that any tape machine whose head has seen significant wear shouldnt have its head azimuth altered as the wear pattern may prevent proper tape tracking across the head at any angle other than that wear pattern.

Cheers Tim
 

ndiamone

New member
Which is why for most transfers, I use professional bin-loop duplication decks (all of which have reels)
recalibrated to run at playback speed with repo cards and heads set up for normal frequency range.

No matter WHAT size the tape or its' track configuration, using one of these is a sight better than having to twiddle with rack wrap height azimuth and zenith when calibrating one ditzes with the other four, on here each adjustment is independent.

The only thing you have to worry about especially in the enclosed cartridge tape formats is the tape is so thin compared to reel standards that you can never use the Fast Wind on the deck - just unthread from the transport and push Play, then let your thumb rest on the feed and takeup reel L I G H T L Y so you can keep tension without stretching the tape and then rethread and go on/
 

ndiamone

New member
pretty interesting stuff.
A note though .... as a confirmed vinyl maniac, linear tracking tables are horrible. The theoretical advantage of having no tracking error is WAY outweighed by the issues caused by servos constantly 'hunting and seeking' the proper place in the groove. The sound of a good pivoting arm is virtually always much better if the overhang has been set up properly.

But that's just an observation ....... nice of you to provide such information.
Ten years later and I finally get some time to myself again since the VA has new Veteran homecare
programs when they are not eligible for the County/State versions due to too high of an income.

That servo seeking issue is exactly the problem. However Denon made a prototype in the early 80s
I believe where it would take a few revolutions and map the groove pack for variable pitch/depth
and then store that information to drive the linear tracker BEFORE it was tripped by falling out of
line following the groove pack.

I think the California Home Electronics Museum in Orange County had one if they are still around.
 
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