Resonance at 132 Hz

skycyclepilot

New member
I'm using a pair of KRK Rokit 5 G3 monitors with a PC in a small bedroom, for listening to music, and editing audio. Mid bass is strongly accentuated, so I used a frequency generator, and determined that there is a really strong resonance at 132 Hz. I moved one of the speakers outside and swept the lower frequency band, and heard no such resonance. This is not a home studio. It's a small, crowded bedroom. The PC and speakers are against one wall, and moving them away from the wall in not an option. Since it's a bedroom, and not a studio, treating the room is not an option.

I can parametrically equalize out that frequency, but I'm wondering if there are other options. I've thought about getting rid of these speakers, and buying a pair of Kali LP-6 speakers, but I'm worried that I'll still have the same problem.

Please advise and comment...
 

witzendoz

Senior Member
Short answer is no. Putting an eq in the monitor chain will not give an accurate monitoring situation. Even moving the monitors away from the wall a few inches can make a difference, even a sheet of absorption material (not foam) can help, speakers against a wall or even worse in a corner will increase the bass.

Alan
 

skycyclepilot

New member
Short answer is no. Putting an eq in the monitor chain will not give an accurate monitoring situation. Even moving the monitors away from the wall a few inches can make a difference, even a sheet of absorption material (not foam) can help, speakers against a wall or even worse in a corner will increase the bass.

Alan

Thanks. That's what I figured. However, I am not running a home studio - just a PC and pair of speakers. I'm not looking for absolutely accurate reproduction - just something that sounds reasonable. I have high end headphones for the rare occasion where I need precision. The speakers are close to a wall, and the bass is emphasized a little, but that isn't the problem. There is a sharp peak at 132 Hz. It takes a -12 decibel, Q-5 peak filter to normalize it. That's one helluva resonance, and I'm not sure what's to blame.
 

witzendoz

Senior Member
132 Hz is bass, and this highlights bass trap requirements. Fortunately 132Hz is not super low bass so even some simple bass trapping or broadband absorber can improve it quite a lot.

Alan
 

mjbphotos

What?!?
Unless you have absolutely no space, acoustic treatment is the answer. Make/buy some 4" thick traps, but them behind the speakers - and make sure you don't have a speaker in a corner, too. Traps can be moved into place, stacked in a corner or closet when not in use.
 

Gtoboy

Active member
Also make sure to isolate the speaker bottoms since a lot of these low mid resonances are amplified by what the monitors are on-desk for example.
 

ecc83

Well-known member
132Hz correlates to a half wavelength of 4.2 feet. Do you have room dimension a multiple of that?

If so you might find sucking that out tricky and probably calls for tuned ,membrane absorbers.

Dave.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
This is weird. Somebody who wants to sort out a problem by any method apart from the proven obvious ones. No treatment no moving kit and nothing apart from processing. I don’t understand what he wants? Magic?
 
Yeah, if rearranging or treating the room is out of the question then the best you can do is sit very close to the speakers and keep the volume down.
That creates its own problems but it's going to be better than sitting back 4-5 feet and turning it up.

No matter what you do it's going to be a compromise - The only thing you've got going for you, right now, is awareness of the problem.
 
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