Recording Live Drums

LaceSensor

New member
I am working on a project with a drummer and we are recording drums + guitar "in the room". The drum kit is mic'ed with 3 mics (Glyn John method.) We used an SM57 on top. PGA56 for the side. And a beta 52A for the kick.

My issue is the transient on the top/side mic. When I set the input gain so that there is no clipping, the audio tracks require a limiter and then some make-up gain to get the balance correct in the mix. The problem is the amount of make-up gain is making the noise floor audible.

What is the most common/simple solution for this?
 

VomitHatSteve

Hat STYLE. Not contents.
You could try using FFT filtering.

I'm only familiar with the Reaper version, but I think the idea should be transferrable between DAWs: Set it to subtract mode. Set it to automatically build a profile. Loop it over a few seconds of "silence"
 

LaceSensor

New member
You could try using FFT filtering.

I'm only familiar with the Reaper version, but I think the idea should be transferrable between DAWs: Set it to subtract mode. Set it to automatically build a profile. Loop it over a few seconds of "silence"

Interesting, the first thought I had was to filter the noise but I have never done this before. I will look into this further.
 

witzendoz

Senior Member
The Glyn John method relies on a few things, Good Room, Good kit and good player. If you don't have these 3 things it does not work. I have used it with the 4 mic method, sometimes it works, usually when it does not work its the drummer being in consistent in the way the drums are hit, or the drums sound like S#it.

By the way I have used a version of the method in a live show situation where we had a lack of mics and channels (in house system) where I did not bother with micing the snare but had a mic out from the floor tom, an overhead and a kick using dynamic mics for the kick and floor and a condenser on the overhead. Worked well, I did not worry about the snare as it is always too loud anyway LOL.

Alan
 

Gtoboy

Active member
Glyn Johns is three mic but he usually has three condensers. I have had great luck with only two mics so you should be able to get a decent recording with what you have, though it isn't necessary to use GJ setup. The thing is to get one mic getting a good balanced sound of the entire kit first. For example, place the biggest diaphragm, flattest mic over the drummers head or in front of the kit pointing generally toward the snare but move around until you get the best balance of kick, snare, hi hat and cymbals. The add a kick or front of kit mic to get the lower frequencies from the kick and toms which means putting the mic lower ,1-3 feet in front of kit OR down low behind the kit generally pointed at the kick/floor tom area, or kick and lowest pitched tom if there isn't a floor tom. The additional mic can be placed in a number of different places but in general, the best place is to fill out anything that seems to be "missing".

I have the room and mics to put as many as i want up nowadays, but I still can get quick and good results with a few mics. The idea is to experiment and get the best track with what you have.

Here is GJ:
 
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