Piano Miking

gcapel

boom box recordings
I am looking for a product I have seen in live performances which is microphone hardware that mounts horizontal in a grand piano. Maybe the same concept similar to a shower rod? The idea is to be able to close the top of the piano without dealing with mic hardware.

Does anyone know who makes such a thing? I have seen something like this in a Tori Amos concert.
 

gcapel

boom box recordings
Not recording for this app. Just live sound, and it will not be played closed. The piano needs to be closed and covered inbetween usage.
 

SouthSIDE Glen

independentrecording.net
That wouldn't be very ideal for recording would it? Wouldn't you choke the sound quite a bit by closing the top?
Well, nobody says you HAVE to close the top when close miking. In fact if you're using regular mic stands/booms to close mic, you have to leave the lid open to make room for the booms to come in.

But the main thing is when close miking, you're not getting the full-developed far field sound of the instrument anyway. This is true not just piano, but of acoustic guitar and other resonant acoustic instruments as well. That doesn't mean that it won't sound good, most of us use near-field miking on guitars and violins all the time, and - in anything short of a great-sounding auditorium or live room - close miking on pianos usually sounds better than far-miking in a lousy-sounding room.

Closing the lid does affect close-miking somewhat, but nowhere near to the degree as it might sound from the outside.

I prefer leaving the lid open, myself, and usually have to because I do not yet have one of those Earthworks contraptions, but often times one might be concerned about bleed from other instruments - especially because the piano is so relatively quiet. in such cases closing the lid halfway or all the way, or draping blankets over the opening may be desired for the isolation properties.

G.
 

gcapel

boom box recordings
Another possible solution i have thought of is using boundary mics that could simply lay flat inside the piano?

Any downsides to using a boundary mic. I have no experience with them.
 

SouthSIDE Glen

independentrecording.net
Another possible solution i have thought of is using boundary mics that could simply lay flat inside the piano?

Any downsides to using a boundary mic. I have no experience with them.
That's a fairly popular miking method.

Personally I prefer both the sound control and the stereo imaging of close miking the strings, but I've heard some good stuff come from boundary mikes.

You might want to do some experimentation with location of the boundary mic if you want to try going that way, that can change with taste and with piano make and size. Some like to stick then vertically on the inside walls of the piano, some like them under or over the strings. I've even seen them on the inside of the lid.

G.
 

Freya

New member
Another possible solution i have thought of is using boundary mics that could simply lay flat inside the piano?

Any downsides to using a boundary mic. I have no experience with them.

I've only used a Tandy PZM (It is nice tho!)

My understanding of pressure Zone microphones is that ideally they would be fixed to a large flat hard surface such as a table or a wall or a sheet of wood.
This makes the surface act as part of the microphone. In the case of the Tandy PZM it would extend the microphone so that as well as using the little metal square it comes with, it will use the wall or table or whatever.

PZM's are supposed to be especially good with piano!

love

Freya
 
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