mixing wih subtractive eq song demo

jimmys69

MOODerator
Try something. Just a suggestion:

Turn down the volume so you can just barely hear the mix. What do you hear? The obvious should be your first thing to address in the mix.

Again, just a suggestion.
 
Try something. Just a suggestion:

Turn down the volume so you can just barely hear the mix. What do you hear? The obvious should be your first thing to address in the mix.

Again, just a suggestion.

Cheers I know i did get some whistles out the guitar compared to the original. and the mixes are improvng but its jjust not there. A lot better than last year though, finally my ear can pick up those frequencies to take off
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
I was more thinking the 'typewriter' sounding kick drum is the most obvious of the source of the mix not sitting right.

I do not know of anyone who likes the sound of a clock ticking to be a good thing.

Don't get me wrong. The mix sounds pretty good for the genre, but I feel you are approaching it in the wrong way. Cutting of frequencies via eq is fine if it is needed. But the reason you are fighting the mix may be from a more simple point of something else being a prominent issue.

And again, just a suggestion. :)

My thoughts: Guitar sounds piecing around 2k, while the bass guitar is not audible without my sub on. Bring up the bass guitar upper harmonics (eq) so you can hear more than just the low end. It will fill out the 'thickness' of the mix. Don't try to get all the frequencies from just the guitar alone.

And good lord, fix that kick drum...

Cheers man!
 

mixsit

Well-known member
Spot on re the bass guitar too. It could be contributing a lot more.
FWIW -not always but sometimes when the roll of the bass in the mix ...or arrangement alludes me, thinking of its place as in two bands- 'sub and 'throat helps open up options.
 
I was more thinking the 'typewriter' sounding kick drum is the most obvious of the source of the mix not sitting right.

I do not know of anyone who likes the sound of a clock ticking to be a good thing.

Don't get me wrong. The mix sounds pretty good for the genre, but I feel you are approaching it in the wrong way. Cutting of frequencies via eq is fine if it is needed. But the reason you are fighting the mix may be from a more simple point of something else being a prominent issue.

And again, just a suggestion. :)

My thoughts: Guitar sounds piecing around 2k, while the bass guitar is not audible without my sub on. Bring up the bass guitar upper harmonics (eq) so you can hear more than just the low end. It will fill out the 'thickness' of the mix. Don't try to get all the frequencies from just the guitar alone.

And good lord, fix that kick drum...

Cheers man!


Thanks man but its is strange Ive sent this to some other people and they are actually complimenting the bass. No idea if this is a room thing or what, using KRK6. But bass has always been my weak point. Drums are just SD3. But thanks again
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
Cool man! Sounding much better. It is a bit bass guitar ringy around guessing 160 hz. My recording software PC is not internet connected so cant pull up eq.

If I could download the track I could be more specific for you.

BTW, I have acoustically treated room/s and good monitors. Done this for quite while so I am not talking out my ass. Which brings me to the dingleberry thing. LOL! What a great title!

You can PM me for an email address if you would like to share the mix so I can download it for better advice.

Dig the groove of the tune man!

Jimmy
 
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LogicLover

New member
Yes, the bass is dominating the mix. if you are not hearing that then you need to have adjustment to your monitors.
The bass sound itself is good, but as Jimmy pointed out there is a frequency to it thats ringing out. E.Q. and volume leveling
will make this track much improved. it has a good feel and and a very cool name ...:)
 

JamGorby

New member
My pre-dominate genre is metal And, for my ears and tastes, there's a simple formula that all three mixes violate when it comes to the 'layering of frequencies' (for lack of better words).
Kick under bass under guitars.
In these mixes, and certainly the last one more so than the others, the bass has taken up all of the low frequencies leaving little room for the kicks to thump. While a clicking kick is all the rage in modern metal, without the thump it just sounds like slapping a sheet of paper.
My first suggestion, you don't need to boost the bass on a bass guitar much if at all. It's already a bass instrument and should already have a good fundamental if tracked properly. If anything, and this is going to seem counter intuitive but it often works, you can carve out a chunk in the bass below about 90hhz to make the bass sit better in a mix. I would also not touch any other low end eq on it and concentrate on whether or not it has definition i.e. can you hear finger/pick attack? IF so, you're probably good just to leave it as is and work on wrapping the other instruments around it. That dip you just made in the bass is a place where your kick can get it's thump. Enough of a boost to get those cones in your speakers throbbing a little. But, not too much. Any more than 3 db and something else is wrong.
Guitars should live above all of this stuff. Carve out as much lows in the guitars as you can get away with without them loosing beef. They should have just enough low end to gel with the bass without stepping on it.
Lastly, I'm not too keen on the guitar tone itself. Seems like you're going for more of a djent sort of thing but the guitars are a little too 'nice'. They need to be more nasty.

There's my 2 cents.
 
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