Microphone for recording

LoungingWithJon

New member
Hi everyone,
I hope this is the right area to be posting this question. With being new, im still getting the hang of things here. So here is my question. Right now i have the blue nessy desktop microphone for my pc. The sound is great, but the feature i thought it had wasnt there. So what i want is a microphone that has the feature to where when im talking in the mic, and say i move to the right side of the mic or left, the sound will actually be heard from that side of the speaker when listening to the recording. I thought the mic i had now did that, but when i record and go back and listen you cant tell if the sound is coming from the left or right and so on. I was told the blue yetty or how ever its spelled will do what i want for that. So if anyone can suggest what mic will do that, and it not be too high in cost, that would be great. Like i said i just want the mic to have the feature of being heard where ever you are speaking from, counting behind the mic left, or right. I hope i made sense of what i was saying lol. Thanks everyone.
 

cyrano

New member
I didn't quite understand it like that... :D

Anyhow, we wouldn't want him to go from a Blue Nessie to full ambisonic, would we?

Especially since the Nessie comes with (according to the manufacturer):

THE ONLY MIC WITH A BUILT-IN SOUND ENGINEER

And by that, they mean auto EQ, de-essing, compression, and level control—in real time!
 

keith.rogers

Bobby'); DROP TABLE USER
Ok, I couldn't find a lot on the Yessie, but the Blue Yeti does have
  • Tri-capsule array—three condenser capsules can record almost any situation
  • Multiple pattern selection—cardioid, bidirectional, omnidirectional and stereo
So, that seems like the bump up over the Yessie that would provide stereo, in fact it's got both stereo and figure 8, selectable via a switch.

Getting the software to recognize and playback both tracks appropriately would be the next step.

P.S. I thought ambisonic might not be the answer, but was hoping for some eyepop sounds, at least. Looking like another drive-by...
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
To be honest, if I was doing this, I'd record in mono, and then adjust the position when I'm editing. This gives the listener a solid position. If you move around a stereo microphone, then to a listener with headphones it can make them feel nauseous - as unless you stay in exactly the same position, they hear you moving and it's very distracting. is it for a specific purpose - like "Now you hear me here, and now you hear me here"
 

cyrano

New member
Ok, I couldn't find a lot on the Yessie,

Of course not. It's the Nessie. I suppose they are referring to Loch Ness? :D

It's one of these newfangled USB mics with a DSP. Promises auto everything, except auto-tune. I'm sure there's a market for that one too, but not enough room in a typical mic, xause it requires more horse-power from the DSP. I've played around with one of the Sure ones, to be disappointed by headroom and noise.

but the Blue Yeti does have
  • Tri-capsule array—three condenser capsules can record almost any situation
  • Multiple pattern selection—cardioid, bidirectional, omnidirectional and stereo
So, that seems like the bump up over the Yessie that would provide stereo, in fact it's got both stereo and figure 8, selectable via a switch.

The Blue Yeti is still a mono mic... Owww... the USB one offers stereo. Wonder how they do that, with 3 different capsules. Something like MS? But no panning.

P.S. I thought ambisonic might not be the answer, but was hoping for some eyepop sounds, at least. Looking like another drive-by...

Way too complicated, not to mention expensive. Even when the cheapest Chinese ambi mic is like 350$ or so. A serious one will still set you back over a thousand...

And don't expect anything eye-popping at the recording level. It's in post that you'll find the profit. Like suppressing room sound, or changing orientation. Still a lot of work, but at least it's possible.

Like Rob says, turning the pan knob (or automating it in the DAW) is probably the least silly answer.
 

ecc83

Well-known member
", then to a listener with headphones it can make them feel nauseous"

Really Rob? The BBC have been broadcasting radio drama and news groups for decades using stereo mic arrays (mainly CO-I I think) Now, I take the Radio Times every week and always devour "Feedback" first thing and I have never read of headphone users throwing chunks?

If the OP ever comes back and really wants "surround sound" a dummy head recording with a pair of SDCs is bloody scary! Only works on cans of
course.

Dave.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
Absolutely Dave! But we're talking very different techniques - a group of actors around a stereo mic is different. Close in to a stereo mic the image moves far too quickly and that is what make the headphone wearer feel weird. The old BBC play techniques were set to give a stereo spread and people's movement was quite limited. The actors were not allowed to be left, then centre then right as the OP wants to do. It was common to spike the floor with coloured marks, very carefully set up in rehearsal, and they had to hit their marks to get the balance and perspective right. If you get say a foot away from a crossed fig 8, then move your head left and right it's simply horrible to listen to. Not realistic, and maybe of you want to scare the audience it could work.
 

Tadpui

Well-known member
The Blue Yeti and Yeti Pro do, indeed, have a true stereo mode. It can be used either via USB, or via the split XLR cable that come with the microphone. It'll just require you to create a stereo track in your DAW, or 2 mono tracks that are panned 100% apart.
 
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