Interesting articles

spantini

COO of me, inc.
Silent Stage w/IEMs

This is more on the live side, but could be useful in a large studio.

https://blog.64audio.com/the-benefits-of-switching-to-a-silent-stage/

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I was moving in this direction some 30 years ago when I ditched my large bass rigs for a rack module processor DI'd to FOH. Didn't have IEMs in those days so still had to monitor from wedges and PA. Our guitar player downsized to a 15W combo mic'd to FOH - almost silent. Drummer was full acoustic mic'd to FOH with his own wedge, made for some peculiar stage mixes.
 
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spantini

COO of me, inc.
One of my longtime wishes has been to record music directly from my thoughts to some type of recording device. Like an XLR from my brain to an interface - or wireless, even! So this afternoon I Googled 'can i record music directly from my brain' and tripped across this brief article. It has some interesting points, and I would like to have had it go on longer and into more detail, but..

Bear in mind this was written 14 years ago.

https://cdm.link/2007/08/mp3-music-no-longer-connected-to-your-brain/
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
Glitch Free - An In-Depth Guide To Tuning Windows For Reliable Real-Time Audio Performance

Not really an article, but.. I tripped across this over at the Tascam Forums. It may be helpful.

GUIDE PDF
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
I've always just flipped knobs on my amps every which way without actually knowing what I was doing. It seemed like the quickest way to find a sound i liked. The presence knob always left me scratching my head, though. I kind of always liked when I cranked it up as it gave me a cleaner sound without adding harshness. To my ears, it's a subtle difference from 0 to 10.

This explains in layman's terms what it's doing : https://www.fender.com/articles/tech-talk/be-in-the-moment-the-presence-control-explained

Also, check out the additional info after the end of the article - about the difference between an amp's gain and volume
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
Ah, you kids! My first computer was self built around a Z-80 processor, no disks, and 1MB of anything was a pipe dream. I made my own audio interface
to work on an 8086 PC-XT clone.
Things have moved on a bit.
 
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TAE

All you have is now
Things have moved on a bit.
yeah just a smidge...ya got me beat by a mile I built my first daw in 1995 with a P133 and a awe 32 soundblaster that came bundled with digital performer..also bought the daughter board for that card...dems was the daze and so are these.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Ah, you kids! My first computer was self built around a Z-80 processor, no disks, and 1MB of anything was a pipe dream. I made my own audio interface
to work on an 8086 PC-XT clone.
Things have moved on a bit.
I remember writing BASIC programs on an HP2000 in college, around 74-75. I couldn't afford a computer when they first came out, but once TI dropped the price of the TI99/4a down to $150, I was able to get one. Add a cassette recorder and a black and white TV and I was on my way. I've still got my old TI, Atari 800 and 800XL, and Apple }{+.
Yeah, I would say things have changed a bit.. the cheapest smartphone is light years more powerful than what we started on. But, now almost everyone is just a user, hardly anyone knows how to program or even build systems.
 

Orson

Well-known member
I built this pc I am on just over 2 years ago now. Its easy with the part pickers that sell the bits. All it is is a few nuts and screws. Not even a kids 'Mechano' kit. Now there's something from the past!

About 13 years ago I learnt code and built websites and also learnt about seo internet marketing stuff. I got my websites and others I had made to top of Google etc.

First pc I had was a Dell in 2002. Never knew anything about pc's or internet until then. I never knew anything about sound/recording until a couple of years ago. I never stop learning every day. Fascinates me.
 

Slouching Raymond

Active member
I remember writing BASIC programs on an HP2000 in college, around 74-75. I couldn't afford a computer when they first came out, but once TI dropped the price of the TI99/4a down to $150, I was able to get one. Add a cassette recorder and a black and white TV and I was on my way. I've still got my old TI, Atari 800 and 800XL, and Apple }{+.
Yeah, I would say things have changed a bit.. the cheapest smartphone is light years more powerful than what we started on. But, now almost everyone is just a user, hardly anyone knows how to program or even build systems.
Coming from the electronics side I learnt to program in Assembly Language first, and never really liked Basic. I too bought a TI99/4a, which was quite impressive, but also slow. I took mine completely to bits, on some late nights in my college room, and mapped out the circuit diagram. It was slow because there was NO main RAM, just a tiny amount of 'scratchpad RAM'. The Basic programs were passed to the video processor, to store in the video RAM. You could buy a RAM/Assembler module for it, which would have been great, but I couldn't afford it.
Although technically trained, I am just another 'user' most of the time.
 
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