import tracks

682

Member
Can you import a finished 2 track song into Cube and then add separate tracks in addition and then remix as long as your first 2 tracks stay the same..? to fill out a song a little bit..
 

gecko zzed

Grumpy Mod
You can do that in any DAW.

It can be difficult if the imported track has already been heavily compressed and limited, because the there is not much acoustic space for the new tracks to fill.
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
You can do that in any DAW.

It can be difficult if the imported track has already been heavily compressed and limited, because the there is not much acoustic space for the new tracks to fill.

Yep. As gekko stated, it is all about what you start working with.

I do a bunch of 'fixing' with musicians that do recording at home or other places that over process the tracks. It sometimes works well, and sometimes it is only 'damage control'.

What type of tracks are you looking to start with? Judging how they sound before you track with them, will be the first determination of how well the final product may become.
 

682

Member
I brought in a finished 2 track. It was WAY out of tempo...???? I fixed that as best I could. (thanks for the YT Cubase videos) but...the sound quality was Terrible..I mean nothing like the 2 track. That 2 track master rounded fine in Garageband as tracks and as a finished master. It sounded Exactly the same in my DAP and played thru Mac via my Interface and headphones. All the same as you would expect.
In Cubase the sound was cheap, the instruments didn't sound the same...you would think as a master it would
just play as a 2 track and sound the same as long as you used an interface and headphones...I mean a sound wave is a sound wave,no?? Is there some weird settings in Cube that can screw up something simple like this...??
I was just going to add some bass parts ,subtle, and then re export. The GB master is 24/44.1.
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
Did you import at the wrong sample rate and then time stretch it? That would cause the audio quality to be poor. Especially if you slowed down the tempo.

A wav file will sound exactly the same as it did after importing to Cubase unless you did the above.

Open a new Cubase project. Make sure your Project Setup is set to 44.100 kHz at 24 bit or 32 bit float.

Top menu: Project>Project Setup

Even if it were not set correctly, Cubase by default should ask you if you want to convert file to project sample rate unless you change that in Preferences.
 

682

Member
yea it was out of 44.1.... but wasn't worth it anyway... I am going to stick to making tunes in one DAW and just stick
to that DAW ....
 

jimmys69

MOODerator
yea it was out of 44.1.... but wasn't worth it anyway... I am going to stick to making tunes in one DAW and just stick
to that DAW ....

All good to stay with one DAW man. But know that there was an issue on either your other DAW export or a setting you missed or changed importing to Cubase.

I import tracks all the time from clients that use various DAW's including a 22 song project that was all recorded with Garageband just this month.

The tempo being off is the key point that something was not right.

Either way, enjoy!
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
You NEED to work out what you did wrong so it doesn't;t come back and bit you all the time. In video editing, going back and forth between programmes and even computers is normal and perfectly quality concious. I edit on one computer either in my video studio or in my audio studio a mile away. I'll grade the edit file, open it on the PC in my audio studio, bring the audio files into cubase on the other PC in the studio, edit, add, tweak and fiddle, then dump it back into the video editor quite transparently. If you had horrible problems, something went wrong. You need to to work out what to make sure when you need to do this, you can. .wav and .mp3 work fine, and cubase can now take in video files and extract the audio if that's useful to you - it just works.
 
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