How To Use FerricTDS

240v

Super Perfectionist
Hello all,

I've been using a free VST called FerricTDS and what I do is I put it first in my master FX chain. Somehow it makes the song sound so much fuller, but the annoying thing is I don't understand how this happens and I want to know what I'm doing.

If anyone could tell me, it would be much appreciated. Thank you very much :)
 

elbandito

potential lunch winner
As I understand it, ferric is a saturation/limiting plugin. Imagine rwcording to tape... Because of the mediums low bandwidth and necessarily limited headroom, the tracks you record would be compressed-sounding and a little distorted once you reached a certain threshold. FerricTDS attempts to emulate this and does a pretty good job, imo. I use it too and think its great!
 
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elbandito

potential lunch winner
I don't think its something to be used on the 2bus, though some may disagree with me. I like the subtlety it imparts when used on certain tracks... I really dig it on the drums and bass, especially.
 

Mo Facta

Farts of Nature
It's certainly something to use on the 2 Bus because it's subtle. I use it all the time and it sounds great, imo.

Cheers :)
 

sixer2007

New member
Yep, 2 Bus is just another way to say Master Fader.

I use this plug a lot too. Lately I've been trying a bit of advice that I learn from Michael Brauer on Pensado's Place. He talked about using some over all main busses that combine certain elements so you can compresses them, etc together before the 2 bus. I use this on my "groove" bus (drums and bass typically) and I love it! It really brings everything to life IMO.

On a side note, Thrillseeker LA is another one of that package that i can't do without. I used it on a group of drum room mics on a recent mix and it's the best comp I've found for that so far. It can had some subtle harmonics to things (there's an extra panel at the bottom of the plugin that you can open for a few new options). If you've only been using FerricTDS, I recommend checking out the rest too. Best free plugs I've used to date.
 

jamintravis

New member
I'm still pretty much in the beginner stages of understanding mixing and mastering. I don't have very good equipment, and I don't demo as much as I used to. I did download the FerricTDS for the last couple things I played around with and I agree with everyone that it does a pretty good job. I wish I understood saturation and mastering more in general, though. And for the life of me I don't understand buses, sends, and all that jazz. But that's really because I just haven't bothered with them.
 

CFox

Banned
Hello all,

I've been using a free VST called FerricTDS and what I do is I put it first in my master FX chain. Somehow it makes the song sound so much fuller, but the annoying thing is I don't understand how this happens and I want to know what I'm doing.

If anyone could tell me, it would be much appreciated. Thank you very much :)

When you read the accompanying manual, which keywords or part didnt you understand ?
 

sixer2007

New member
I'm still pretty much in the beginner stages of understanding mixing and mastering. I don't have very good equipment, and I don't demo as much as I used to. I did download the FerricTDS for the last couple things I played around with and I agree with everyone that it does a pretty good job. I wish I understood saturation and mastering more in general, though. And for the life of me I don't understand buses, sends, and all that jazz. But that's really because I just haven't bothered with them.

Hey Jamin, What DAW are you using to do your mixing (Cubase, logic, reason, PT)? All DAWs have buses and sends but some call them by a slightly different name in many cases. For example, I use Cubase and they call buses "group channel tracks" whereas a track dedicated to an effect (reverb typically for instance) that would then be SENT to an audio track is called an "FX Track". If you give us your DAW someone might be able to point out a good tutorial to figure out those basics.

I'll give the explanation a shot, just because i'm feeling lucky haha.
So, overall a bus is really simple. All it is a single track (often in Stereo so that panning placement can be maintained, but can also be mono if you wish) that you can route other tracks to, and then manipulate them on ONE FADER. For example, If you have 2 guitar tracks that are the same, one left and one right, you can create a stereo bus and make the OUTPUT of each guitar track your new "GUITARS BUS". This way you can change the volume, compress, add an EQ, etc, to both signals at the same time. Also incredibly useful for drums so that after you have all the pieces in the right volume, you can turn up and down the whole kit very quickly.
In cubase, there is no limit to what can be routed to what bus. This means that bus 1 can be routed to bus 2, and bus 2 can be routed to bus 10, if that's what you need.

Now for sends, and a bit more tricky to explain. Your DAW might be much different from cubase (which is all i really know) so i hope this will translate for you. In cubase, you create an FX track that can be dedicated to one effect, like reverb. In all of the individual track options (in the mixer, like many DAWs), there is a place where you can choose that FX track (let's call it "vocal reverb") as a send. That send control has a volume control so you can choose how much of that reverb you want to effect the vocal sound. So what it does is take your vocal reverb (with the reverb plugin on that FX track (it might be called an AUX track for you)) and send the signal TO your vocals so that the vocals now have some reverb. Turning up the send increases the reverb, turning it down reduces it. This Vocal reverb can now be SENT to any track you wish so that you aren't running multiple version of the same plug in, but sharing the one with many pieces of audio.
So then, to me, a send would say "take my signal, and share it with whoever needs it".

I hope this helps... That was my first go at trying to explain that without having my DAW open to show someone. I promise they aren't that tough once you've figured it out in your DAW. Let us know what software you have and we might be able to help more!
 

jamintravis

New member
Thanks! Right now I'm just using Reaper. I moved back down to Florida last year after spending some time in Pennsylvania, and my Mac is still up there in my friend's apartment, but I normally use Garageband. So any additional info relative to those DAWs would be great. I also use Sonar from time to time. I'd use it as my regular if I was more comfortable with it.
 

elbandito

potential lunch winner
Reaper is a great daw and is a little different than cubase, in that any track can be mono, stereo, send, nested folder, bus, etc. Its really flexible but because of that very flexibility, it can be aa little confusing. Lots of ppl here use reaper and weve got a forum dedicated to its use. Ask in there for reaper-specific advice and I'm sure youll get all the answers you need. :)
 

240v

Super Perfectionist
When you read the accompanying manual, which keywords or part didnt you understand ?

I understand all, but it's just that I'm not entirely sure on how this comes together and makes the track sound brighter/more alive.
 

sarahbebrigh

New member
I'll give the explanation a shot, just because i'm feeling lucky haha.
So, overall a bus is really simple. All it is a single track (often in Stereo so that panning placement can be maintained, but can also be mono if you wish) that you can route other tracks to, and then manipulate them on ONE FADER. For example, If you have 2 guitar tracks that are the same, one left and one right, you can create a stereo bus and make the OUTPUT of each guitar track your new "GUITARS BUS". This way you can change the volume, compress, add an EQ, etc, to both signals at the same time. Also incredibly useful for drums so that after you have all the pieces in the right volume, you can turn up and down the whole kit very quickly.
In cubase, there is no limit to what can be routed to what bus. This means that bus 1 can be routed to bus 2, and bus 2 can be routed to bus 10, if that's what you need.

Now for sends, and a bit more tricky to explain. Your DAW might be much different from cubase (which is all i really know) so i hope this will translate for you. In cubase, you create an FX track that can be dedicated to one effect, like reverb. In all of the individual track options (in the mixer, like many DAWs), there is a place where you can choose that FX track (let's call it "vocal reverb") as a send. That send control has a volume control so you can choose how much of that reverb you want to effect the vocal sound. So what it does is take your vocal reverb (with the reverb plugin on that FX track (it might be called an AUX track for you)) and send the signal TO your vocals so that the vocals now have some reverb. Turning up the send increases the reverb, turning it down reduces it. This Vocal reverb can now be SENT to any track you wish so that you aren't running multiple version of the same plug in, but sharing the one with many pieces of audio.
So then, to me, a send would say "take my signal, and share it with whoever needs it".

I hope this helps... That was my first go at trying to explain that without having my DAW open to show someone. I promise they aren't that tough once you've figured it out in your DAW. Let us know what software you have and we might be able to help more!

Sixer 2007, Oregon poster,
I'll give the explanation a shot, just because i'm feeling lucky haha.
So, overall a bus is really simple. All it is a single track (often in Stereo so that panning placement can be maintained, but can also be mono if you wish) that you can route other tracks to, and then manipulate them on ONE FADER. For example, If you have 2 guitar tracks that are the same, one left and one right, you can create a stereo bus and make the OUTPUT of each guitar track your new "GUITARS BUS". This way you can change the volume, compress, add an EQ, etc, to both signals at the same time. Also incredibly useful for drums so that after you have all the pieces in the right volume, you can turn up and down the whole kit very quickly.
In cubase, there is no limit to what can be routed to what bus. This means that bus 1 can be routed to bus 2, and bus 2 can be routed to bus 10, if that's what you need.

Now for sends, and a bit more tricky to explain. Your DAW might be much different from cubase (which is all i really know) so i hope this will translate for you. In cubase, you create an FX track that can be dedicated to one effect, like reverb. In all of the individual track options (in the mixer, like many DAWs), there is a place where you can choose that FX track (let's call it "vocal reverb") as a send. That send control has a volume control so you can choose how much of that reverb you want to effect the vocal sound. So what it does is take your vocal reverb (with the reverb plugin on that FX track (it might be called an AUX track for you)) and send the signal TO your vocals so that the vocals now have some reverb. Turning up the send increases the reverb, turning it down reduces it. This Vocal reverb can now be SENT to any track you wish so that you aren't running multiple version of the same plug in, but sharing the one with many pieces of audio.
So then, to me, a send would say "take my signal, and share it with whoever needs it".

I hope this helps... That was my first go at trying to explain that without having my DAW open to show someone. I promise they aren't that tough once you've figured it out in your DAW. Let us know what software you have and we might be able to help more!

just wishing to confirm . . .that you refer to the FX in the Devices to VST connections where the add bus is.
I do not understand GROUP FX and FX nor buses (understood) and child buses (in relation to bus and do not understand channel, if it is just one more bus); nor how to use chord track with a simple QWERTY Cubase nor difference between send and bus channel after reading "https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2500173?start=0&tstart=0" nor how to route a send to a bus and aux to a send/bus
 
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