How much Eq before mastering

djclueveli

New member
how much eq should i put on vocals before mastering takes place. how should the frequency chart look like for the eq on vocals before mastering. like what is the maxium number it should reach for each individual frequency like 200Hz, 700Hz,........and so on. I know this is probably a hard question to answer but if u can help me out that would be real great. o yea and what is a good number to set the "Q" to when boosting and Cutting. thanks
 
Wow, this is a hard question! In general, I've heard you always boost at least 18db with a Q of 7 or greater. If you want a tight sound you have to use a high Q... I heard Dr. Dre uses a Q of 20 but I can't get it that tite.
 

chessrock

Banned
What the pros do is they use a logarythmatic formula to determine the maximum allowable decibal level for each given frequency in the spectrum. It goes something like a over b times x, where a is the frequency ... and b and x are the maximum allowable threshold of the coefficient times x over b.

Then you multiply all of this by the number of ceiling tiles in the room in which it was tracked, and that should do it. Setting the Q value is much simpler, as you can skip the coefficient values associated with y. It does, however, require a regression analysis in order to determine if there is a positive association between x over b and y.

If you'd like me to perfrorm the calculations for you, my work is rather cheap. I'd be happy to settle for 50 bucks an hour, strictly as a favor to a home rec'er in need.
 

SonicAlbert

Super-Sonic "Herb" Albert
djclueveli said:
how much eq should i put on vocals before mastering takes place. how should the frequency chart look like for the eq on vocals before mastering. like what is the maxium number it should reach for each individual frequency like 200Hz, 700Hz,........and so on. I know this is probably a hard question to answer but if u can help me out that would be real great. o yea and what is a good number to set the "Q" to when boosting and Cutting. thanks

This is not a hard question at all, and the answer is easy: use your ears.

The process that occurs before mastering is called mixing. You really don't need to think about preparing your mixes for mastering, or making decisions based on mastering at the mixing stage. All you need to do is to get the vocals to sound the way you want them to sound.

As far as I know there is no formula for how to eq vocals that would apply to all vocals. Each voice is different, so each voice has to be eq'ed differently. If there is a specific rapper that you like, you could listen to his vocals on his albums, and then play around with your eq until you get a similar sound.
 
R

RAMI

Guest
If a car leaves New York city travelling West at 60 miles an hour, how old is my Uncle? True or False?
 

LeeRosario

New member
I love chair.


[Bad attempt at looking mature after that statement]Good movie[/bad attempt at looking mature after that statement]
 

jmorris

New member
chessrock said:
What the pros do is they use a logarythmatic formula to determine the maximum allowable decibal level for each given frequency in the spectrum. It goes something like a over b times x, where a is the frequency ... and b and x are the maximum allowable threshold of the coefficient times x over b.

Then you multiply all of this by the number of ceiling tiles in the room in which it was tracked, and that should do it. Setting the Q value is much simpler, as you can skip the coefficient values associated with y. It does, however, require a regression analysis in order to determine if there is a positive association between x over b and y.

If you'd like me to perfrorm the calculations for you, my work is rather cheap. I'd be happy to settle for 50 bucks an hour, strictly as a favor to a home rec'er in need.
Damn stop, stop! my gut hurts! :)
 
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