Connecting Monitor Outputs Of Audio Interface To Alternative Speakers

bdam123

Member
So I'm trying to put together a little cheap digital guitar practice rig. I'll have a iPad running some guitar emulation software and I'll be getting to that via an audio interface with monitor outs. I'm trying to figure out a way to have a speaker setup without having to buy a pair of studio monitors.

With the desk I'll be using, I have space for a sound bar or something similar. These usually take aux ins. My question is: Is there a way for me to properly get from the Left and Right monitor outs of the audio interface into something like a sound bar which utilizes an aux in?

Thanks
 

ecc83

Well-known member
BSGuy is no troll! Give us more information. Make and model of interface, same for the BT speakers (and I am not sure if you want to switch to another speaker set?)
That will give us a clue as to the signal levels involved. You see, a BT speaker's AUX inputs are likely to want -10dBV* (316mV) or even lower whereas most AIs can put out +12dBu or over 3 volts. Unless the BT speaker has a control for its AUX input (unlikely) you will have trouble matching levels between two speaker systems.

*I make no apologies for the 'technicals.' Like playing in tune and in time, THESE are the things you must know in this modern electronic musical world. I am always ready to explain.

Dave.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
Anything can pretty much connect to anything in the audio world - it really is often just a case of cables having the correct connectors - no magic or even extra interface equipment.

Sound bars usually have separate left and right on phono (RCA) connectors - the red and white ones. Ipads would have a headphone type connector - a 3.5mm stereo (3 circuit) plug - you would then need a cable with that on one end and the two others on the other end. Very common. 3.5mm to stereo phono RCA works on Amazon. That's assuming your sound bar has these connectors - all the ones I've seen, have!
 

bdam123

Member
BSGuy is no troll! Give us more information. Make and model of interface, same for the BT speakers (and I am not sure if you want to switch to another speaker set?)
That will give us a clue as to the signal levels involved. You see, a BT speaker's AUX inputs are likely to want -10dBV* (316mV) or even lower whereas most AIs can put out +12dBu or over 3 volts. Unless the BT speaker has a control for its AUX input (unlikely) you will have trouble matching levels between two speaker systems.

*I make no apologies for the 'technicals.' Like playing in tune and in time, THESE are the things you must know in this modern electronic musical world. I am always ready to explain.

Dave.
Thank you, Dave. This was more of what I was looking for. I have a UAD Volt 1 that I'd like to connect to this. I haven't made the purchase of the Soundbar yet as I'm still shopping around but its either going to be this or something similar.
 

ecc83

Well-known member
Thank you, Dave. This was more of what I was looking for. I have a UAD Volt 1 that I'd like to connect to this. I haven't made the purchase of the Soundbar yet as I'm still shopping around but its either going to be this or something similar.
The spec shows the Volt 1 as having a maximum output of +15dBu that is nearly 4.5 volts and I suspect well above the input clipping point of most soundbars.
Yes, normal recording levels will be about 20dB below that so around half a volt but mixed down stuff is generally brought up to within a gnat's of 0dBFS so some inline attenuation might be needed?

Dave.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
Most of them are designed with very wide level matching abilities. The line out on my TV is very low compared to be MacBook I occasionally plug in the system I have here. The only annoyance is when you switch to another source and the volume is disaster area level. Disaster area, for younger people were the loudest rock band in the universe.
 
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