Compressor pedal question.

dogooder

Well-known member
I bought a pedal rack that had a boss compressor included. Whenever I turned it on I would get some type of feedback.
I figured the pedal was bad. I also have one I built, which scares me, but when I used it I got the same results.
Anyone have any feedback on this?
I tried them stand alone and they seemed to work properly?
Two bad pedals in a row?
I don't want to buy another compressor at the moment.
What's your thoughts? Probably dirty thoughts mostly, but besides that.
J.D.
 
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spantini

COO of me, inc.
I'd say gain is too high through the rack. It can get out of hand with a bunch of linked pedals. Could be one pedal, several, the order of placement - or all the above.
 

dogooder

Well-known member
I'd say gain is too high through the rack. It can get out of hand with a bunch of linked pedals. Could be one pedal, several, the order of placement - or all the above.
That is one reason I posted the question about pedal chains. I didn't get much feed back on that except mostly preferences..
If I remember correctly I had them hooked up next to last in a seven pedal set up with the following chain.
1-chandler overdrive, 2-cry baby, 3,delay, 4, chorus/flange, 5, TC tremolo, 6, compressor, 7 volume control.
Maybe I should try the volume first and the overdrive last?
I want to have this pedal board set up by Sunday for a short gig and I have two new pedals I switched out and have
to get set properly. I might just have to leave a compressor out for now.
I rarely ever use pedals when playing at home and I haven't played out in about five to seven years so..
 
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spantini

COO of me, inc.
I might zero in on the overdrive and cry baby gains to start. My guess is the chain order probably has less to do with the feedback than the gain staging. Pedal order may contribute, but their order can be worked out later. I've read articles on which processors go where so they don't interfere with each other, then they frequently add the option of switching them around to see if it sounds better or worse. Each pedal board collection will be different.
 

dogooder

Well-known member
I might zero in on the overdrive and cry baby gains to start. My guess is the chain order probably has less to do with the feedback than the gain staging. Pedal order may contribute, but their order can be worked out later. I've read articles on which processors go where so they don't interfere with each other, then they frequently add the option of switching them around to see if it sounds better or worse. Each pedal board collection will be different.
To top it off I just ordered an octave pedal, a small TC electronics, they were on sale at Sweetwater and I have been wanting to get one. I think that is the last pedal I would want? You hit that octave with some fuzz and you have that bumblebee effect like Beck and Page. I don't think I am going to screw with the compressor and chain order until after this gig. I will just leave it out for now. I don't have the boss anymore, only the one I built, and that scares me.
 

markmann

Active member
It really should not matter where you have the compressor as long as it is before time based effects. Keep in mind that dirt pedals have natural compression so I only ever use compression on clean and mild breakup sounds to help those to not get lost when playing with other instruments. When you get feedback is it the cool harmonic feedback when notes are sustained or a nasty high pitch squeal?
 

dogooder

Well-known member
It really should not matter where you have the compressor as long as it is before time based effects. Keep in mind that dirt pedals have natural compression so I only ever use compression on clean and mild breakup sounds to help those to not get lost when playing with other instruments. When you get feedback is it the cool harmonic feedback when notes are sustained or a nasty high pitch squeal?
If it were too high pitched I wouldn't hear it! It is nasty though, you don't want it, trust me.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
Thanks. It'll have to wait until next month sometime at least. I'm investing heavily in my car's maintenance right now. I'll let you know when I can swing it and hopefully it will still be there.
 

LazerBeakShiek

200M Subscribers
Compressor pedals have always been 'suspect' to me. Stay away from them. Get a full featured compressor and place it after the preamp.

Put nothing in front of the preamp input.
 

dogooder

Well-known member
Thanks. It'll have to wait until next month sometime at least. I'm investing heavily in my car's maintenance right now. I'll let you know when I can swing it and hopefully it will still be there.
I am saving up to pay a piano mover to move one of these nice pianos I always see for free. Going to cost me about 400.00, but I will have an honest to goodness piano for the first time in my life.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
I am saving up to pay a piano mover to move one of these nice pianos I always see for free. Going to cost me about 400.00, but I will have an honest to goodness piano for the first time in my life.
OMG! This brings back a nightmare scenario from earlier days. The first solid band I got into, we practiced in our drummer's basement. Old Northern Virginia home in Arlington, real wood construction. This was his parent's house and he was still living there. The family was gifted an upright piano they kept in a small parlor off the kitchen. They wanted the space and decided to put it in the basement. It weighed a ton and we tried taking it down the narrow wooden steps from the kitchen to the basement. We made it halfway when the top of the piano caught a floor joist and wedged in tight. It was too heavy to push back up and it couldn't go down so we left it 'til the next day. Somehow that night the family got some fresh bodies in and they managed to wriggle it free and down the steps.
 

dogooder

Well-known member
OMG! This brings back a nightmare scenario from earlier days. The first solid band I got into, we practiced in our drummer's basement. Old Northern Virginia home in Arlington, real wood construction. This was his parent's house and he was still living there. The family was gifted an upright piano they kept in a small parlor off the kitchen. They wanted the space and decided to put it in the basement. It weighed a ton and we tried taking it down the narrow wooden steps from the kitchen to the basement. We made it halfway when the top of the piano caught a floor joist and wedged in tight. It was too heavy to push back up and it couldn't go down so we left it 'til the next day. Somehow that night the family got some fresh bodies in and they managed to wriggle it free and down the steps.
One curb sized step and we are in the basement.. It won't be my job getting from wherever? I am going to try and hold out for a baby grand. I see them going for free once in awhile. I have plenty of room.
 

LazerBeakShiek

200M Subscribers
but I will have an honest to goodness piano for the first time in my life.
You can make some great memories ..Grab some good friends and take turns playing and singing. Start young.

We used the piano in the church's basement. Taught each other and learned it all by ear..mostly off the radio.
uprightMemories.jpg
Everyone could play. They are just waiting their turn. Let the girls do the bass hand part, or whatever. There's room for two, to play a love song, in time with each other.
 
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dogooder

Well-known member
You can make some great memories ..Grab some good friends and take turns playing and singing. Start young.

We used the piano in the church's basement. Taught each other and learned it all by ear..mostly off the radio.
View attachment 125579
Everyone could play. They are just waiting their turn. Let the girls do the bass hand part, or whatever. There's room for two, to play a love song, in time with each other.
I am about to be 71, a little late to start young.
 
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