Burned project into a CD-R and no sound

I audio mixdowned the project into a mp3 file. Then I rendered it in to one audio file. And burned it on a blank CD disk 700mb from Windows 10 Media Player. It burned it onto the blank disk. I tried it in the auto CD player and it counted the seconds(was moving forward) but no sound. Some people are saying not to use mp3 but use a wav. file and change the burning speed . And how do I get Windows Media Player to let me name the disc and name each track?.Any help?
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
media player is pretty basic - you can do the basic stuff but that is it. MP3 sounds less good than a .wav because mp3 files are compressed, so rarely the best way to go. One thing - did it finalise? When you burn a CD it does the burn, then before it can be ejected it has to be finalised. My guess is that didn't happen, so you made a drinks coaster. you can keep adding tracks then you finalise the CD, Then you cannot add more. I think naming is simply the file name that gets used on explorer or media player. If you put all the tracks in one long file you cannot individually name them, you must add the individual files, then burn the disc.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
Media Player always worked flawlessly on my Win XP system. When I moved to Win 10 Home, it began to fight me at every turn - refusing to burn CDs, then some would burn but not play in my car.. like the OP's situation. The same discs from the same box burned fine in XP but were rejected by Win 10 (most likely due to the different hard drive system). I finally gave up and installed a third party CD/DVD app, which I now don't use because I've switched to USB thumb drives to play in my car and, recently, Win 11 Home with a whole new Windows Media Player that seems quite a bit more accessible. I haven't even considered exploring it's CD/DVD features (blahh!) :D
 
Media Player always worked flawlessly on my Win XP system. When I moved to Win 10 Home, it began to fight me at every turn - refusing to burn CDs, then some would burn but not play in my car.. like the OP's situation. The same discs from the same box burned fine in XP but were rejected by Win 10 (most likely due to the different hard drive system). I finally gave up and installed a third party CD/DVD app, which I now don't use because I've switched to USB thumb drives to play in my car and, recently, Win 11 Home with a whole new Windows Media Player that seems quite a bit more accessible. I haven't even considered exploring it's CD/DVD features (blahh!) :D
What was the name of the app?
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
I have a couple of CD-Rs I used Media Player to burn a bunch of mp3 files to which play in my car just fine. I'd make sure you're using the correct type CD discs, some discs are not recognized by some drives.

I have a Dell PC so I follow this procedure for burning with Windows Media Player : https://www.dell.com/support/kbdoc/...ank CD-R,,to select the drive you want to use.

There are a few Player/Burners in the Microsoft Store. Here's an example of a FREE one :

burner.jpg
 
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TalismanRich

Well-known member
I've had issues with burning audio CDs with the native Windows apps, including the old Windows Media Player. I used to use either Roxio or Nero. Neither of my versions will run under Win10, so I have started to use CDBurnerXP. Works fine with Win10, and makes a standard audio format CD. I've seen people try burning MP3s to CD, not realizing that they are really just writing data discs, not RedBook style audio CDs.

I do have a couple of older CD players which will refuse to read any CDR or CDRW. The newer ones work fine, like my car (2016), DVD players and my Sony 100 disc changer. An old Panasonic and a Memorex CD players won't read them at all.

To add titles to an audio CD, you need enable CD Text. It depends on what program you are using to master and burn the CD. I don't remember seeing CD-Text in Win Media Player. Nero does allow it. I think some versions of Roxio did as well.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
I just did a test run with CDBurnerXP on a CDRW with a mix of MP3s and Wav files, with different bit rates. The disc was burned as an audio CD with everything burned properly. I enabled CD Text, and when I loaded it into CDEX, it showed the title and artist names, not the file names. Media Player didn't read the text. VLC read everything properly.

You might give it a try. It's free to use, burns CDs, DVDs, and BluRays and makes ISOs. CD Burner XP
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
I just did a test run with CDBurnerXP on a CDRW with a mix of MP3s and Wav files, with different bit rates. The disc was burned as an audio CD with everything burned properly. I enabled CD Text, and when I loaded it into CDEX, it showed the title and artist names, not the file names. Media Player didn't read the text. VLC read everything properly.

You might give it a try. It's free to use, burns CDs, DVDs, and BluRays and makes ISOs. CD Burner XP
Thanks, Rich. I just added that to my PC. Looks good. I'm fresh out of CDs so I can't play with it yet.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
You would think that Microsoft would make their product better than the competition as some kind of status thing, but clearly, not.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
I have a Win 11 laptop and it does have the new Media Player which, from what I've read, does burn CD/DVDs, but this requires an optical drive which my laptop doesn't have - it's all SSD and USB stuff. Because of this, my Media Player displays no menus or options for burning. Evidently, if there is no optical drive there is no reason to have these features, so they were not included in this configuration.

I'm not sure yet, as I haven't played with it too much, but I think I like this new version of Media Player much better than previous versions. Things are easier to find and access without digging down through menus for stuff that should be at the top of the tree.
 

RRuskin

Rick Ruskin
I audio mixdowned the project into a mp3 file. Then I rendered it in to one audio file. And burned it on a blank CD disk 700mb from Windows 10 Media Player. It burned it onto the blank disk. I tried it in the auto CD player and it counted the seconds(was moving forward) but no sound. Some people are saying not to use mp3 but use a wav. file and change the burning speed . And how do I get Windows Media Player to let me name the disc and name each track?.Any help?
Audio CD spec calls for burning 16bit wav files to CDA files. Anything else burned to CDR will play on a computer but not an audio CD player.
 

bouldersoundguy

Well-known member
I audio mixdowned the project into a mp3 file.
I don't know if it's the cause of your problem, but mp3 should only be used when wav isn't an option. Otherwise, use a wav file. For audio CD, you need 44.1 kHz 16 bit wav files. The mp3 format is a leftover from the days of small, expensive storage and slow dialup internet.
 
I just did a test run with CDBurnerXP on a CDRW with a mix of MP3s and Wav files, with different bit rates. The disc was burned as an audio CD with everything burned properly. I enabled CD Text, and when I loaded it into CDEX, it showed the title and artist names, not the file names. Media Player didn't read the text. VLC read everything properly.

You might give it a try. It's free to use, burns CDs, DVDs, and BluRays and makes ISOs. CD Burner XP
I have downloaded the app. How do you burn 12 files at one time . Cannot figure it out. Or naming the songs or disc title?
Sorry I read how to, and maybe it'll work.
Update: I got it to burn 20 tracks and still have room for more. My question is with the app can I get it to burn tracks later? I ask because a CD-R has limitations i guess. I had a small problem when I used a blank CD-R and there was an error saying I had to "insert a CD not CD R". I just sat there and waited ignoring the error and it continued and I was able to burn 20 tracks. But still it's not consumer friendly to waste a CD-R because you cannot burn the time left on it, there must be a way to go around that.
 
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TalismanRich

Well-known member
I don't think I've ever burned a partial CD. I burn the whole project, and make sure it is finalized after burning. Its not difficult to do.

Generally you have 74 to 80 minutes as the maximum amount of time you can record depending on the disc you use. You can load up the list of songs you want and there's an option to save the project, then load it up later and add more songs to it until you are ready to burn the whole thing. Just look at the green bar on the bottom, if it goes into the red, you have too much stuff.

If you're worried about wasting a CDR, get some CDRWs, burn the project and if you want to change it, just erase the disc and start over. I've used them many times, work great for test burns. Save the project and when everything is right, burn the final copy, or just do a disc copy from the CDRW.

If you want to get a commercial product, Nero Burning ROM is available for $45. I don't know that it is anymore foolproof than CDBurnerXP plus it's limited to one machine only, so if you have multiple computers, or get a new one, you have that hassle to deal with. (Really a pity, as BurningROM was a really good program back in the day, but I don't think it's kept up with the times).
 
I don't think I've ever burned a partial CD. I burn the whole project, and make sure it is finalized after burning. Its not difficult to do.

Generally you have 74 to 80 minutes as the maximum amount of time you can record depending on the disc you use. You can load up the list of songs you want and there's an option to save the project, then load it up later and add more songs to it until you are ready to burn the whole thing. Just look at the green bar on the bottom, if it goes into the red, you have too much stuff.

If you're worried about wasting a CDR, get some CDRWs, burn the project and if you want to change it, just erase the disc and start over. I've used them many times, work great for test burns. Save the project and when everything is right, burn the final copy, or just do a disc copy from the CDRW.

If you want to get a commercial product, Nero Burning ROM is available for $45. I don't know that it is anymore foolproof than CDBurnerXP plus it's limited to one machine only, so if you have multiple computers, or get a new one, you have that hassle to deal with. (Really a pity, as BurningROM was a really good program back in the day, but I don't think it's kept up with the times).
I just tried it on a 2004 model car CD player and it's!<beautiful<! except for 3 tracks volume burned so high it distorts the car speakers even at low volume...any help on it? I am suspect about the volume at which the track was rendered in place at in my audio daw(music editing program)this is music that I had made myself with various instruments. so tell me if it is a possibility.(who said Walmart was cheap?..lol) that's where I bought 10 blank CDs cheap.
Update; if I don't finalize the burn on the CD-R type disc, can I go back another day and add more audio tracks using CD burner XP?
 
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TalismanRich

Well-known member
CDBurnerXP will only burn EXACTLY what you give it. Unless you use an add-in, it will not normalize volume between tracks. If you add a distorted file, it's going to be distorted when you play it.

Step #1: render the files, and then load them into something like media player and play the whole thing to make sure that the files are good!!!! Make sure that you don't have any type of enhancements enabled in Windows. Things like that can mask any issues you have, like volume and EQ issues. Once the files are deemed good and the sound is even, THEN burn the CD.

I don't burn CDs that aren't finalized. Theoretically, that's the way its supposed to work, but I can see issues, like forgetting to finalize, then it won't play in another device. In the old days, people would use CDs as backup devices because they held so much data. That was when you had 100MB hard drives. You could hold all the files on a single CD 6 times over, so it made sense. CDs aren't useful for that anymore. Get a 64GB flash drive for backup!

Skip the 10 pack CDRs. Go to Walmart or Staples and buy a 100 pack of CDRs for $25. Then burning a bad disc is only a quarter! If you worry about that, buy 10 CDRWs and just use and reuse them for test purposes. I have about 50 CDRWs and almost 300 CDRs. I bought them when they were on sale, so cost is negligible. You'll be good for a few years.
 
CDBurnerXP will only burn EXACTLY what you give it. Unless you use an add-in, it will not normalize volume between tracks. If you add a distorted file, it's going to be distorted when you play it.

Step #1: render the files, and then load them into something like media player and play the whole thing to make sure that the files are good!!!! Make sure that you don't have any type of enhancements enabled in Windows. Things like that can mask any issues you have, like volume and EQ issues. Once the files are deemed good and the sound is even, THEN burn the CD.

I don't burn CDs that aren't finalized. Theoretically, that's the way its supposed to work, but I can see issues, like forgetting to finalize, then it won't play in another device. In the old days, people would use CDs as backup devices because they held so much data. That was when you had 100MB hard drives. You could hold all the files on a single CD 6 times over, so it made sense. CDs aren't useful for that anymore. Get a 64GB flash drive for backup!

Skip the 10 pack CDRs. Go to Walmart or Staples and buy a 100 pack of CDRs for $25. Then burning a bad disc is only a quarter! If you worry about that, buy 10 CDRWs and just use and reuse them for test purposes. I have about 50 CDRWs and almost 300 CDRs. I bought them when they were on sale, so cost is negligible. You'll be good for a few years.
Music to my ears..lol..
 
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