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Thread: Electric Guitar Recording techniques

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    Electric Guitar Recording techniques

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    Hi everyone,

    I've been dabbling in recording for a little bit and have a small home set up.

    I have a question about recording electric guitars. I am micing my amp which is an Orange dual terror with an Orange 2x12 with a SM57. I play alternative rock, so nothing really metal or anything. It seems that when I record my guitars I can never get that "big" guitar sound, and they tend to sound thin. I double them and pan hard left and right but I still can't manage to get a decent fullness. My interface is a Presonus Quantum 2.

    Is there any advice anyone can give? Does a full guitar sound matter more on the source signal or is it achieved in the mixing process? Is it mic placement? More guitar tracks?

    Here is a link to some of my recordings, the "November sessions" are more recent.

    You can hear some of my recordings on my Bandcamp, user name is Refractionmusic. (I can't post any links yet)

    Thanks in advanced! Joe

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    As ever...Guitar Amp Recording |

    Then, peeps seem universally hissed off woth their early attempts at recording electric guitar. "More is less" seems to be one factor? Less volume than you think you need, less distortion. Then there is the "Pig's ear" factor. I seem to have read a few negative reports of the Orange Terror? What speakers are in the 2x12? V30s for example are quite harsh and "middy".

    Have you tried re-amping? That allows you to loop a clip whilst you faff about with amp controls and mic positions, listening the while on cans.

    No doubt some ACTUAL guitar playing recordists will come in soon!

    Dave.

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    One thing comes to mind immediately.
    Doubling tracks using the same amp.

    That ain't gonna give you bigness.
    You should change it up as much as possible.

    'Big' guitars involve different amps, different guitars and different parts being played.
    Then panned hard left and right. You want what is in the orher channel to be different, not the same.


    Look at AC/DC. Those guitars are HUGE.
    Different amps, different guitars and different guitar parts being played by the brothers. It all adds up to a wall of guitars.
    And they're not that distorted.

    Another thing. One's 'bedroom sound', while it may sound fat and chunky, won't sound good in a mix.
    One tends to compensate for lack of a drummer and bass player. In a mix, all that low end just muddies it up.

    Edit: your interface has nothing to do with it.

    The orange tiny terror....eh. Not a fan. But even with that you could get decent tones.

    Try very different tone, gain, ect settings to get different sounds out of it. Play around. Get out of this mindset of 'this is my sound'.
    Experiment.
    Good luck, have fun.


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    Music | Refraction

    Some good suggestions given already.

    Honestly from listening to the November tracks, the guitars seem well represented. I'm wondering where the low end is. I'm thinking you could probably pull the bass up 6 to 9 dB in those tracks.

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    Scroll down the page.Actually the whole thread is pretty cool.Yep guy has a way with words.
    Delay,reverb,chorus for thickening.

    Why do your recordings sound like ass? - Page 14 - Cockos Incorporated Forums

    G

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    Maybe post an example of what you're trying to achieve with your guitars? The demos you've posted sound pretty decent guitar wise to me... but perhaps with an example of what you want them to sound like someone may have some insight into the techniques involved in getting them. I can say that most of a "big" guitar sound is in the arrangement... it's not in adding more of the same riff... you could try to do your normal double tracked l/r guitar parts and also add a secondary double tracked l/r part with another guitar playing a different part... another trick in the past is to play the same guitar part on the D string of your bass through your same guitar rig to add some thickness to the part. Perhaps you could record your Dry guitar signal (not a mic'd cab) and test out some different IRs which may get you the sound you're looking for.

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    In my 30+ years of recording I have found only ONE truth to getting "BIG SOUNDING" anything is to record a big sounding source.

    Of course one ears' "big" is another ears' mud.

    Really truly BIG guitars need really truly space and volume.... Since it sounds like you don't have that you will have to rely on technique.

    There's a ton of information being referred to here and other forums about just this very thing. I can only add what I know to be true no matter what........

    Three things: Mic placement- Closer to the center of the cone= more high-end less low end. Spatial depth: Even in small spaces you need to create the illusion of size with close and room mics. And ALWAYS take a clean DI right off of the guitar to allow your library of sounds to enhance the mics' capture. You can create size with this capture by manipulating the time if nothing else. Source: This will include all the parts of the source itself. In your case the guitar and how it's set up to sound.....how it's played and the arrangement of it's use in the music.....the amp and all it's tonalities.....everything else I've mentioned and how it sounds on your playback system.
    Chord with this, Teddy......

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    Quote Originally Posted by cavedog101 View Post
    In my 30+ years of recording I have found only ONE truth to getting "BIG SOUNDING" anything is to record a big sounding source.

    Of course one ears' "big" is another ears' mud.

    Really truly BIG guitars need really truly space and volume.... Since it sounds like you don't have that you will have to rely on technique.

    There's a ton of information being referred to here and other forums about just this very thing. I can only add what I know to be true no matter what........

    Three things: Mic placement- Closer to the center of the cone= more high-end less low end. Spatial depth: Even in small spaces you need to create the illusion of size with close and room mics. And ALWAYS take a clean DI right off of the guitar to allow your library of sounds to enhance the mics' capture. You can create size with this capture by manipulating the time if nothing else. Source: This will include all the parts of the source itself. In your case the guitar and how it's set up to sound.....how it's played and the arrangement of it's use in the music.....the amp and all it's tonalities.....everything else I've mentioned and how it sounds on your playback system.
    I REALLY don't know but, maybe some of the convolution "spaces" could work for the OP? I think these are getting easier and cheaper (free?) to use?

    And I read somewhere a while ago although in reference to ACOUSTIC guitar..."To get a really great guitar recording.
    Rule One: get a great guitar. Rule One A: get a great guitar player"!!

    Dave.

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    Here is what I really like as far as guitar sound. It’s a song by jimmy eat world, Nothing Wrong.

    I can’t post links yet but it is on YouTube Apple Music and Spotify.

    Now I know that I’m not going to get this exactly as there are a ton of factors but I just like how they are mixed and big sounding.

    Thanks! Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by ecc83 View Post
    I REALLY don't know but, maybe some of the convolution "spaces" could work for the OP? I think these are getting easier and cheaper (free?) to use?

    And I read somewhere a while ago although in reference to ACOUSTIC guitar..."To get a really great guitar recording.
    Rule One: get a great guitar. Rule One A: get a great guitar player"!!

    Dave.
    I actually like some of the convolution reverbs. I'm a big fan of the Valhalla plug too. Convolution verbs are hard to grasp the concept of unless you've actually been in spaces that they are emulating and then they make sense. Chances are the newbie or bedroom recordist hasn't researched this to any extent and perhaps gives up on all the controls simply because they don't relate to what they're going to achieve with them and if they don't stumble onto a preset right away.
    Chord with this, Teddy......

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