Suggestions for improving my recording space...

PDXSmitty

New member
Unfortunately, I am NOT able to devote and set up a room exclusively for recording. Given that limitation, I'm curious if there are things, if any, I can do to improve use of my space for recording (gobos, where in the room I place my mic(s), which way I face, etc.)? I've included a photo, but it's a standard sized bedroom/office with an engineered hardwood floor and a tight-napped area rug covering maybe 60% or so of the floor. There is an upholstered love seat in one corner and everything else pretty much hard surfaces. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.IMG_5277.jpg
 

keith.rogers

Well-known member
I would get or make a couple good-sized gobos - say 3’x4’ (or even a little taller) that you can put in a V behind you when recording, and some heavy or blocking drapes for the window to start. If you can put a couple of good acoustic panels (not foam) on side walls that would be a plus.
 

PDXSmitty

New member
I would get or make a couple good-sized gobos - say 3’x4’ (or even a little taller) that you can put in a V behind you when recording, and some heavy or blocking drapes for the window to start. If you can put a couple of good acoustic panels (not foam) on side walls that would be a plus.
Thanks! Super helpful.
 

PDXSmitty

New member
oof, and I thought my old music room was small. good luck.

is that exercise equipment in active use?
Yes, small indeed. Luckily it's just me recording myself. And yes, that exercise bike gets regular use; that's why I can't dedicate the room to recording - it is also my office and exercise room!
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
A couple of boom mic stands in a tall T shape with duvets hanging from them are remarkably useful in rooms like this. One thing I've learned to do is look at the space, then record something in it. So I'd try a couple of different mic/instrument placements and then listen back with really good headphones or in-ears so you can hear the impact the room is having. Sometimes, by pure luck, problem rooms don't sound small and boxy. It's always possible!±
 

keith.rogers

Well-known member
Thanks! Super helpful.
You're welcome.

If possible, it would be better if your desk/monitor speakers/listening spot were centered between the walls. Then, you would equalize the reflections off the walls from the speakers, and it would give you a good starting spot to place some panels, i.e., the "first reflection point" of your monitors (basically, the "bank shot" from a monitor to its nearer wall, then to your ear). Google how to use a mirror (and 2nd person) to find that spot.
 

PDXSmitty

New member
A couple of boom mic stands in a tall T shape with duvets hanging from them are remarkably useful in rooms like this. One thing I've learned to do is look at the space, then record something in it. So I'd try a couple of different mic/instrument placements and then listen back with really good headphones or in-ears so you can hear the impact the room is having. Sometimes, by pure luck, problem rooms don't sound small and boxy. It's always possible!±
Would I want to place the "wall" of duvets behind me when I'm sitting at the mic or in front of me?
 

keith.rogers

Well-known member
Would I want to place the "wall" of duvets behind me when I'm sitting at the mic or in front of me?
I'm going to jump in - there's a video somewhere of a guy testing in a large space (so not certain of correlation with yours) where he tests a V both in front and behind, and behind actually works a little better. In your space you should experiment (like he did!), of course, and use what sounds best.

The "logic" (I suppose) is that while most of your sound is, indeed, going in front of you, the mic is aimed at the space behind you, so you want to tamp down energy coming from that direction most. Those audio waves that go past the microphone have to hit the wall in front, then bounce to the wall behind, before finally arriving at the microphone again. That much travel will chew up a great deal of audio energy. Now, in a small room, not so much, so you probably want something in front of you, too, like those heavy drapes, perhaps. Or, a duvet or moving blanket draped on a boom, if you find it helps.
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
The other reason for putting the damping behind you is that if you are using a cardioid mic, the rear reflections will already be significantly reduced due to the polar pattern. You have to deal with the noise in the front and side of the mic.
 

ecc83

Well-known member
Bit drastic but...Yes centre the desk in the room but also draw it out a mtr maybe a mtr and a half and then put the monitors behind it on stands, if you are up to gogbos you can make speaker stands or you might find a pair of 'bar stools? The stands need to be skeletal i.e. not solid to the floor as that will accentuate the low end.
Is that a slatted blind on the window? Well that's just a chocolate teapot. Get some seriously heavy curtains (as 'we' call 'em!)

Now I know the top peeps here slag off 'foam' but proper acoustic pyramid foam is very useful at the mirror points.

As ever, I make no apology for suggesting the 'Studio SOS articles free in www.soundonsound.com

Dave.
 
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