Studio monitor recommendations and condenser mic recommendations

MapacheAcuatico

New member
Hey guys, I wanted to ask for some advice.

I had my eyes set on a pair of Kali Lp-8 and when I made the order today it turns out the distributor has sold out (I live in Mexico), and won't restock until March. From what I heard this seemed like the best price for quality that I could find. Are there some monitors out there that compete that you guys would recommend? I was so set on those that I don't know where to begin.

I also wanted to invest in a condenser mic that could be used for recording acoustic guitar and vocals at the same time. For high quality live recordings type of deal. I have an SM81 already which I often use to record acoustic guitar, and I'm pretty happy with it (but it's just one, so it's mono) So perhaps the set-up could be the SM81 on the guitar and the other condenser picking of voice AND guitar? But maybe this route would create a lack of control? (because the vocal recording would be mixed with guitar) Any input would be appreciated. I had been looking at the Roswell K47 but I'm not sure how well this could pick up vocals and guitar.

I am aware that micing things separately can be a lot easier to deal with, but I'm a big fan of the way it sounds when you get those big condenser mics to pick up everything at once.

Edit: the distributors do have LP-6s but I've heard the low end is not as present on them. Has anyone compared the two?
 
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Papanate

Active member
I don't know what Mexico is like - but they are in stock on Amazon. Re: A Condenser - look at the Shure KSM44 - sounds like a U87 only a bit clearer top end and similar bass response.
 

CoolCat

Well-known member
Im a Shure fan, its like the working-mans pro line...KSM 44 , I sold mine...then bought one back and have it still.
I had all three KSM 27,32, 44 for awhile. Sold all of them during gear trading and GAS searching mic test drives, but in the end, after trying several other mics the KSM 44 is back.

Has great low noise and is the flagship with multi pattern.
Bought USED I paid $375-$425 US, with case and small clip. no shockmount.
(The Shockmount is screwed up, but I found the MXL shockmount V67 works on the KSM44 and its only $19.)

KSM 44 also has a PAD so if its too sensitive, can pad it down...just a great mic.
$500 us you can get a MINT USED if you have patience. w/case, shock mount and clip included.
Its so well built they say you can put it on a kick drum! never did that.
Post COVID prices are going up...

KSM44 is a LDC dual diaphragm, multi pattern
KSM32 is a MDC, cardioid
KSM27 is a LDC single diaphragm cardioid

Compared to a U87 ..I dont have any experience. MIX had articles comparing the two.

Shure stuff has great resale too if you decide to try other mics.
I sold it once to try some U47 clone stuff, tube mics, but went back to a LDC without the hassle of the power supplys , added noise, added cables etc...and again the KSM44 is so quiet.

Its very sensitive so a noisy room isnt a good match but with the PAD, that reduces it 15db, between the capsule before hitting the mic-amplifier.(less sensitive) making it even more versatile.

thats my 2 cents anyway.... a nice addition to your SM81! imo
 

MapacheAcuatico

New member
Thanks a bunch for the advice. KSM44 seems like a great choice. New it's definitely outside of my budget comfort zone, especially with the import prices here, but I'm looking at some used options, and I'm trying to find places that might do global shipping for the LP-8s.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
You mentioned the one mic for voice and guitar. While it's true that you can indeed get good recordings this way, most folk don't do it because getting the right mic is a small part of the problem. It works in a really good room, with a really good instrument with the mic in the correct place - and this is often what people put a clip up and want it sorted . usually the guitar or voice is too prominent, or the guitar desperately needs reverb that the voice doesn't, or vice versa. You can use compressors to ease the dynamic range of the voice, without doing to to the guitar too, so clarity and balance and blend are frequent problem areas. You also need one mic that flatters the voice and the guitar. Few do.

Some folk insist on using two mics for just the guitar to capture the different sound from the neck and sound hole areas - others tend to use one and spend time finding the best position. Remember that while you could use the two mics to produce a wide stereo sound field, it will sound very odd. If I do use two mics they will be panned to nearly the same place in space, then blended together. Reverb can then recreate the sound of the guitar in an artificial space, with width. Those big condensers are not magic - if your room has the wrong acoustics, one really good mic can easily sound awful - so think before you buy.
 
I use Kali Audio's IN-8s (there's a new model now out). No complaints. I have not compared these to others (in the same price range), but I've never heard anything bad about them... always near the top of the list for the price.
 

CoolCat

Well-known member
You mentioned the one mic for voice and guitar. While it's true that you can indeed get good recordings this way, most folk don't do it because getting the right mic is a small part of the problem. It works in a really good room, with a really good instrument with the mic in the correct place - and this is often what people put a clip up and want it sorted . usually the guitar or voice is too prominent, or the guitar desperately needs reverb that the voice doesn't, or vice versa. You can use compressors to ease the dynamic range of the voice, without doing to to the guitar too, so clarity and balance and blend are frequent problem areas. You also need one mic that flatters the voice and the guitar. Few do.

Some folk insist on using two mics for just the guitar to capture the different sound from the neck and sound hole areas - others tend to use one and spend time finding the best position. Remember that while you could use the two mics to produce a wide stereo sound field, it will sound very odd. If I do use two mics they will be panned to nearly the same place in space, then blended together. Reverb can then recreate the sound of the guitar in an artificial space, with width. Those big condensers are not magic - if your room has the wrong acoustics, one really good mic can easily sound awful - so think before you buy.
so true. and the room often leaves mics like a KSM 44 MultiPattern in CARDIOD 99% of the time anyway, so the cheaper CARDIOD LDC can save some $$$.
KSM27 for example is the same capsule, as the 44 only one sided...and the headbasket is different but a Pop Filter fixes that and KSM27 is 1" and sometimes used as low as $100 (before COVID).....I think one MIX comparison the guy thought the 27 sounded more like his 87.

even two SM81 could probably make a nice Vocal+ Acoustic sound. 2 mics.
I did a small shootout on acoustics with several SM81 new, old US, and PG81 (discontinued) and the PG81 hung in there really well and were super cheap, and great acoustic sound I like the SM81 best, but its pricey and the PG81 was sooo close and 2qty for $100 or something (preCOVID).

the room....distance ...mic location... acoustic guitar. blankets, duvets,
 
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