Sliding sounds between chords

Cypher420

New member
For lo-fi I just want to hear the chords of my guitar being played but it seems the sound of my fingers sliding from chord to chord is just as loud as the chords themselves. I'm using an electric guitar plugged into an audio interface which is connected to my laptop. Is there an easy way of solving this problem?
 

Mickster

Well-known member
Yeah.....likely you need to learn how to mute the strings with your pick hand palm as you move from chord to chord. Is this the first time you've heard yourself playing electric guitar on a recording? If so....it's natural to be surprised and hear more than you thought before. Post a sample here when you can. We might be able to give you more targeted advice.

2 cents worth of.....flat strings are quieter.....but don't sound the same....you know?

Mick
 

Cypher420

New member
Yeah.....likely you need to learn how to mute the strings with your pick hand palm as you move from chord to chord. Is this the first time you've heard yourself playing electric guitar on a recording? If so....it's natural to be surprised and hear more than you thought before. Post a sample here when you can. We might be able to give you more targeted advice.

2 cents worth of.....flat strings are quieter.....but don't sound the same....you know?

Mick
Yes, I guess it is the first time. I've never heard of flat strings!
 

Richard Monroe

Well-known member
For lo-fi I just want to hear the chords of my guitar being played but it seems the sound of my fingers sliding from chord to chord is just as loud as the chords themselves. I'm using an electric guitar plugged into an audio interface which is connected to my laptop. Is there an easy way of solving this problem?
A couple of suggestions- Hard- Pick up your fingers and put them down on the next chord or position. No slide, no noise. Easy- soak the tips of very your fretting fingers in hot water for about 5 minutes before recording. You'll be surprised how much less noise you'll get. Sliding into a chord, especially a 2 or 3 note power chord can actually sound very good if you do it when you intend to. All the time is right out. So is squeaking.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
He puts the lotion on his hands.

Bag Balm: Bag meaning cow udder. Cows aren't particularly fond of dry scratchy palms & fingers(and neither are guitar strings when you are trying to record?). Balm meaning stuff that will help make your palms & fingers less dry & scratchy.

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I've never tried it(for reducing noise when playing/recording), but perhaps silicone spray? Preferably food grade, I would think. I have used it for various other applications, slick stuff(the latest?..does great to reduce friction so the windows in your vehicle glide up and down with ease). It may even be the active ingredient in some of the "fret-ease" type sprays. Not sure. Check warning labels to make sure it is safe. NOT ON THE GUITAR, OR FRETBOARD. Spray a little bit on a paper towel, then handle the paper towel. A little goes a long way. It's just an idea, don't shoot the messenger, or guessenger as the case may be. Disclaimer: Do your own research and make your own decision. Could be brilliant, could be one of the dumbest things you've ever done in your life.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
The only way we can help is a short YouTube clip we can see and hear. Then we will know how it’s happened and we can help.
 
Besides, proper technique (lifting off certainly is key), using a noise gate can get rid of some of the issues, particularly if you're using a gainy amp. But even professional mixers often will cut out the noise by snipping the sections out of a DAW. Obviously, you would need to add delay, reverb, etc., POST-recording... or you will truncate your delay and reverb.
 
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