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Thread: Transfer from 8track analogue to CD

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    I record on 8 track analogue and would like to get my music onto CD. Then I would like to get my music onto the MP3 website. What software/hardware do I need? I have Windows 98 PC. thanks,
    roseanne

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    In general, not knowing your equipment:

    1. Connect the recorder to the PC by going from the master outs into the line in on the soundcard. You can try this first without having to buy any new hardware. If the quality isn't good, which is very possible unless you have upgraded the soundcard in the PC, you might need to buy a better soundcard. In that case, you have a great resource available to you in the BBS and main HomeRecording site for researching a new card.

    2. Record the audio into the PC using an application such as Goldwave or Cool Edit, which are both available as shareware. There's lots of other downloadable wav editors such as these that you can use, I'm just mentioning two that seem to work well. If you find that the sound quality needs some work, then you might want to move up to a software package that has more options and plugins for editing and improving the quality.

    3. Once you have recorded the wav files, then you can burn them to a CD. If you don't already have a CD-RW drive in your PC, there are lots of good ones out there. In the $200-$250 range, the HP and Sony models (8x4x32x) are great.

    4. To create MP3s and post them you need software to compress the wav file. You can search the BBS here for all kinds of recommendations on this.

    Good luck, and post any further questions that you have about this.

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    I use a Gadgetlabs Wave 8/24 sound card which allows all 8 tracks to be sent from the deck to the computer at the same time. Then I use Cakewalk to edit each track individualy. That's about $600 for the card and $300 for the Cakewalk. There are cheaper ways, so it just depends on how you want to go about it. You could use a cheaper sound card and mix 8 tracks down to 2 while you transfer to your computer, but you would lose the ability to edit individual tracks. Or you could send one or two tracks at a time to the computer and line up all 8 in the computer. Or you could put a synch track on your tape and that would keep tracks lined up. Maybe you don't want to edit. I don't know what you're wanting to do. You'll have to figure out which approach is feasible for you and your wallet. Check out the info on this website's homepage.

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    [Thanks Jon, I am going to ask a stupid question and that is where is the sound card located on the computer where I plug the 8 track into? Also, can I record from an 8 track directly into a CD recorder without going throur the PC or do I need a converter? ]Originally posted by Jon X:
    In general, not knowing your equipment:

    1. Connect the recorder to the PC by going from the master outs into the line in on the soundcard. You can try this first without having to buy any new hardware. If the quality isn't good, which is very possible unless you have upgraded the soundcard in the PC, you might need to buy a better soundcard. In that case, you have a great resource available to you in the BBS and main HomeRecording site for researching a new card.

    2. Record the audio into the PC using an application such as Goldwave or Cool Edit, which are both available as shareware. There's lots of other downloadable wav editors such as these that you can use, I'm just mentioning two that seem to work well. If you find that the sound quality needs some work, then you might want to move up to a software package that has more options and plugins for editing and improving the quality.

    3. Once you have recorded the wav files, then you can burn them to a CD. If you don't already have a CD-RW drive in your PC, there are lots of good ones out there. In the $200-$250 range, the HP and Sony models (8x4x32x) are great.

    4. To create MP3s and post them you need software to compress the wav file. You can search the BBS here for all kinds of recommendations on this.

    Good luck, and post any further questions that you have about this.
    [/QUOTE]


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