Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: What is RMS Size in a Compressor?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    182
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    1588

    What is RMS Size in a Compressor?

    Sign in to disable this ad
    I'm getting to know the compressor in Reaper called ReaComp. One of the sliders on the bottom says RMS Size, measured in milliseconds. What is this for? Try to keep it simple, as I am no geek.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Age
    48
    Posts
    2,784
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Rep Power
    846266
    Have you seen these ReaComp Videos yet?

    http://www.cockos.com/wiki/index.php...ReaComp_Basics

    http://www.cockos.com/wiki/index.php..._Using_ReaComp

    RMS can sometimes be more like the way your ear responds to level changes. Using the PSP vintage meter will give you a pretty good idea of what different rms sizes do.

    Here is a geekier page http://www.digido.com/bob-katz/level...-k-system.html

    (I know you said no, but later itll be handy)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    182
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Rep Power
    1588
    The videos don't help much. The sound keeps cutting out. Don't know why. Very annoying to sit there and wait all the time for the sound to come back.

    I tried running the videos again and this time it was smoother. But the guy didn't really explain what RMS and RMS Size is. He mentioned some settings you can try, but I'd like to know what the hell is meant by RMS Size.

    Would also be nice to find a button that I could pause or rewind the video to a certain part.
    Last edited by 357mag; 05-23-2008 at 00:31. Reason: Addition

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Age
    48
    Posts
    2,784
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Rep Power
    846266
    I'll see if I can get a better link to those videos. Using the RMS function is pretty clearly explained on them, not just with textbook stuff but with a real world way to determine them.

    Basically, you have two ways to determine what input level the compressor threshold is looking at: peak and RMS

    the peak level is the maximum instantaneous value of the waveform. In digital audio, you never want to exceed it. Peak detection is the forte of limiters (or ReaComp when you set the RMS value to 0)

    The trouble is, we dont really hear peaks, our ears just dont care about microsecond level excursions, we care about the sustained level value of a sound. You will see all sorts of arguments over which window size is the most accurate to the human ear, with speech needing WAY different requirements than snare drums for example.

    I suggest using the free PSP vintage meter http://www.pspaudioware.com/indexen....s/vmeter.html;

    Set different RMS times on the meter until you see it most relavently describing the sound you are working on then set the ReaComp rms window to that. This will become second nature to you after a while and youll be using the Vintage Meter trick less and less as time goes on

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Hardware Compressor vs. Software Compressor
    By Bob's Mods in forum The Rack
    Replies: 75
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 21:31
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-09-2007, 15:23
  3. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-03-2006, 17:35
  4. What's the difference between i/o buffer size and sample size?
    By whattaguy in forum Digital Recording & Computers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-16-2004, 00:24
  5. Relationship Between Buffer Size and Buffer Size
    By Merverus in forum Steinberg / Cubase User Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-12-2003, 22:40

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •