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Thread: Possible to record directly as .mp3 file?

  1. #11
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    Jeffrey - may I suggest maybe your mp3 recorder does it poorly? For years I recorded with portable HHB minidisc, despite the doom and gloom comments on that compression system, and I will sink back into the sonic shadows now and smile at what I personally feel is snake oil in may cases. Perhaps we should record using two identical mics to mp3 and wav and let people identify which is which? For speech, you really found mp3 inferior? Maybe your recorder was just terrible, because I don't find the same thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JefferySmith View Post
    I don't even use MP3 to record my lectures via lavalier mic and pocket recorder.
    Me neither. I left mp3 for my own recordings a while ago and only use it when others are involved which demand mp3. Or to play music, as that still is a simple solution.
    Mp3 once was the best, but meanwhile better options turned up. Ogg for instance.

    Quote Originally Posted by rob aylestone View Post
    Given a choice of the identical music in a high quality uncompressed format or a low quality compressed one, then of course, the better one makes perfect sense.
    Right. And mp3 isn't 'the better one' or 'the only one' anymore.

    We can talk endless about and around mp3 and qualities and that mp3 still is a great invention, and i will agree to that.
    But the question was: 'Possible to record directly as .mp3 file?' were i keep some more serious use within homerecording in mind. And my advice is: don't as there are many better options.

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    The simple answer, (which I'm sure you were looking for) is NO, it cannot. It records by default as a 16 bit 44.100 kHz stereo file. You can choose to record in Mono and even change the sample rate, but you can only record in wave. Once recorded you can save to many popular formats, (every available form of Mp3 that I know of is an option to record to). I'm not sure why you wish to record in MP3, as other have stated it is much better to record in a raw format then down-convert it to whatever you wish to use. If space is the problem, these days picking up a cheap, (or free) hard drive is pretty easy to do.

    I hope this helps.
    To do something you've never done, you have to do something you never did.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 007dust View Post
    The simple answer, (which I'm sure you were looking for) is NO, it cannot. It records by default as a 16 bit 44.100 kHz stereo file. You can choose to record in Mono and even change the sample rate, but you can only record in wave. Once recorded you can save to many popular formats, (every available form of Mp3 that I know of is an option to record to). I'm not sure why you wish to record in MP3, as other have stated it is much better to record in a raw format then down-convert it to whatever you wish to use. If space is the problem, these days picking up a cheap, (or free) hard drive is pretty easy to do.

    I hope this helps.

    Thank to you and all who responded. Amazingly enough, there are valid reasons why somebody might need to do this (mostly having to do with a tremendous volume of files being processed in a very limited amount of time, where saving as a .wav and then converting to .mp3 takes valuable seconds multiplied many times over, and batch processing is not a practical option. I discovered that you are correct - the file can only be recorded as a .wav file, with options for mono/stereo, sampling rate, bit depth, etc., in the DAW that I'm currently using (not Audition, for the record - it's Magix Sound Forge Audio Studio 12).

    Here's what I ultimately discovered through a combination of reading and rereading the manual, and trial and error. When initially saving that recording it can be converted with a "save as" to any number of formats, including mp3, without first saving as a .wav. However (and this is a big "however") you MUST choose the alternate format before naming and saving the file, or it sends it into the cornfield someplace under an automatic file number, rather than under the chosen file name to the specified folder.

    Also important - any markers in the file will be dropped when the file is converted to mp3; so in those cases, it does make sense in that context to save as a .wav file until editing is completed, and convert to .mp3 afterward.

    It's all a workaround - the old Sony Sound Forge Pro had a far simpler workflow for all of these processes, but was increasingly incompatible with newer Windows OS, creating crashing issues. I'm not unfamiliar with recording, having worked in the older version 40 hours a week for over a decade; it was just a question of making the software do what I need it to do. If anyone else was interested in doing that too, I wanted to share what I found out.

    Since so many folks chimed in (if only just to tell me what an idiot I am for wanting to do that ), I thought that you should know the answer to the OP.
    Happy recording, all!
    Last edited by whyseye; 1 Week Ago at 19:28.

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    Quote Originally Posted by whyseye View Post
    Thank to you and all who responded. Amazingly enough, there are valid reasons why somebody might need to do this (mostly having to do with a tremendous volume of files being processed in a very limited amount of time, where saving as a .wav and then converting to .mp3 takes valuable seconds multiplied many times over, and batch processing is not a practical option. I discovered that you are correct - the file can only be recorded as a .wav file, with options for mono/stereo, sampling rate, bit depth, etc., in the DAW that I'm currently using (not Audition, for the record - it's Magix Sound Forge Audio Studio 12).

    Here's what I ultimately discovered through a combination of reading and rereading the manual, and trial and error. When initially saving that recording it can be converted with a "save as" to any number of formats, including mp3, without first saving as a .wav. However (and this is a big "however") you MUST choose the alternate format before naming and saving the file, or it sends it into the cornfield someplace under an automatic file number, rather than under the chosen file name to the specified folder.

    Also important - any markers in the file will be dropped when the file is converted to mp3; so in those cases, it does make sense in that context to save as a .wav file until editing is completed, and convert to .mp3 afterward.

    It's all a workaround - the old Sony Sound Forge Pro had a far simpler workflow for all of these processes, but was increasingly incompatible with newer Windows OS, creating crashing issues. I'm not unfamiliar with recording, having worked in the older version 40 hours a week for over a decade; it was just a question of making the software do what I need it to do. If anyone else was interested in doing that too, I wanted to share what I found out.

    Since so many folks chimed in (if only just to tell me what an idiot I am for wanting to do that ), I thought that you should know the answer to the OP.
    Happy recording, all!
    When you "Save As..." you are not actually saving the project data, but something else. The reason you're spending time is because you're doing unnecessary conversions, or so it seems to me. Record into the DAW, save the *project* (internally using the non-lossy files) and just do all your mixing/monitoring with the project files until you're happy, then bounce the final mix to MP3, and even that is unnecessary unless you have to distribute in that format. Most streaming services/sites will accept a non-lossy format file and do the conversion for you, so you can just bounce to the project settings and save the conversion time. Admittedly, sometimes the services conversion is not ideal, so submitting your own lossy format may suit, or the upload time for non-lossy files might be a problem, but then an offline, batch conversion could be done while you're doing the next project mixing, and not impact your workflow at all.

    And, as for space, do what many of us do - get a fast, external drive and put your a/v projects and files there. As a bonus, this almost always performs better than having your DAW/plugin software and projects on the same physical drive.

    Really, to me, the issues you are facing could be addressed with some adjustments to your configuration and workflow, at least in terms of preserving the quality of the final results while saving time and alleviating storage constraints you might be struggling against.
    "... I know in the mornin' that it's gonna be good
    when I stick out my elbows and they don't bump wood." - Bill Kirchen

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