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Thread: 64 bit audio export

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    64 bit audio export

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    Is it possible to export audio mix down in 64 bit (considering that my windows OS was 64 bit) using new Sonar 6?
    If not (what I think) WHY?

    THe same Q for MAC:

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    Because there is no such thing as 64 bit audio.

    If your converters are 24 bit, you aren't going to have any more resolution than that. The wordlength that your computer can compute at has nothing to do with the wordlenght of your audio. Two completely different concepts.
    Jay Walsh
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    Yes, Sonar 6 can bounce 64 bit files (I just did). You're stuck in the tracking frame of mind Fairview and you've forgot about 1. virtual instruments 2. 64 bit effects processing. Cakewalk prides itself in it's utilization of 64 bit summing, mixing and processing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strave
    Yes, Sonar 6 can bounce 64 bit files (I just did). You're stuck in the tracking frame of mind Fairview and you've forgot about 1. virtual instruments 2. 64 bit effects processing. Cakewalk prides itself in it's utilization of 64 bit summing, mixing and processing.
    Crock. Upconverting a 24-bit file does not suddenly embue it with any greater fidelity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strave
    Yes, Sonar 6 can bounce 64 bit files (I just did). You're stuck in the tracking frame of mind Fairview and you've forgot about 1. virtual instruments 2. 64 bit effects processing. Cakewalk prides itself in it's utilization of 64 bit summing, mixing and processing.
    What convertors do you have? What OS?
    Did system just convert 32 bit audio to 64 bit after mixing it?
    Would it be same process like converting mp3 to WAV?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strave
    Yes, Sonar 6 can bounce 64 bit files (I just did). You're stuck in the tracking frame of mind Fairview and you've forgot about 1. virtual instruments 2. 64 bit effects processing. Cakewalk prides itself in it's utilization of 64 bit summing, mixing and processing.
    It it 64 bit floating point or fixed?
    Jay Walsh
    Farview Recording. I am also the forum spokesmodel for Terasyne Amplification

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRUM
    Did system just convert 32 bit audio to 64 bit after mixing it?
    If it is anything that was recorded through converters, you have 24 bit audio, not 32 bit. There is no such thing as 32 bit converters.
    Jay Walsh
    Farview Recording. I am also the forum spokesmodel for Terasyne Amplification

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    Internal math = 64 or less (software based)

    External math = 24 or 16 (hardware based)

    It's that simple.
    This is just a test

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    There's obviously some confusion here!

    Every computer has its own word length, which is dictated by its physical architecture. In general, the length of the computer's "word" dictates a) how big an integer can be, b) how much memory can be addressed, and c) how big a file can be.

    I started programming on 16-bit machines, where the maximum integral value of a word was 32767 (2**16 - 1). Most computers now have 32-bit words, although some mainframes have 36. The newer Intel and AMD computers, of course, have 64-bit words.

    But the size of a byte, whether the word is 32 bits or 64 bits, is 8 bits, and files are generally written and read in bytes or multiples thereof, so ... a file is a file, and it doesn't matter what the machine's word size is.

    If an audio sample takes 24 bits (three bytes), it doesn't sound change the sound one iota to process it in a 64-bit word. You still only have 24 bits of information.

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    Sounds like people are simply throwing out terms here without understanding what they actually mean.

    Most modern day DAWs (Cubase, Sonar) allow you work in a 32bit float mode. The additional bits help during the mixing process and not recording.

    Everytime you apply an effect to a track, you are simply executing mathematical operations. If you have 8 additional bits in front of or behind your 24bit audio file, you have more space to perform those mathematical operations with more precision and not destroy/loose resoluion your original data in the process. Basically it prevents digital clipping (loss of resolution, usually in the high frequencies).

    Think of the additional 8 bits as an "Alpha Channel" for your audio. Alpha channels are used extensively in Photoshop when you composite 2 images and need to worry about transparency masks, etc.

    I do not know if Sonar 5/6 employ a 64bit float audio engine, but if they did, it would not provide any significant benefit over a 32bit audio engine and be useless overkill.

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