What's goin' on with everybody

TAE

All you have is now
That's alright. man! We used to play lots of outdoor gigs like that in Virginia. That guy in the hat... is that Larry The Cable Guy? :LOL: Back around 1978 I used to jam with a drummer who's band was The Boyz.
Man it's been 40+ years since I played a gig like this...looks like I'll get to play some more if I can keep up with em... Looking forward to when I get to do this one next year....
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TalismanRich

Well-known member
For years, I've been making a salsa verde with lots of habaneros for extra heat. I ordered up a bag of dried chiltepin peppers for my next batch - see what they'll do for my salsa.

Trying to find the Scoville on habaneros and chiltepins, they range all over the place. I've heard and read the chiltepins are hotter than habaneros but a lot of what I'm finding is they're on the lower end of the habanero scale. Then again.. one account has the chiltepins at 20X habaneros. I dunno...

When mine arrive I'll chew on one and see for myself.

This year's crop of ghost peppers has just started to bloom. Last year was a banner year, I probably still have 30 or more in the freezer. One pepper is good for a full sized pot of chili, and I have some in a pepper grinder for when it's time for some serious heat. One little twist is usually more than enough to spice things up.
 

TAE

All you have is now
I have some in a pepper grinder for when it's time for some serious heat. One little twist is usually more than enough to spice things up.
Wow that is a great idea.... never thought of or have heard of that but that beats the heck out of trying to shake the right amount out of a container with holes in the cap.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
This year's crop of ghost peppers has just started to bloom. Last year was a banner year, I probably still have 30 or more in the freezer. One pepper is good for a full sized pot of chili, and I have some in a pepper grinder for when it's time for some serious heat. One little twist is usually more than enough to spice things up.
I just added a bag to my next pepper order. WoooHooo..!!:P🥵
 

TalismanRich

Well-known member
Save the seeds for your next crop. This year I bought a Jiffy seed starting tray with 25 peat pellets. I got 24 plants from my stash of seeds, more than I could use. I gave away about 10 plants, planted several in the ground and several in pots. The pots are doing the best, about 2 ft tall now and blooming.

A few years ago, the maintenance guy at our plant was talking about peppers. I told him I would bring him a couple of ghosts, figuring that he knew what he was dealing with. My bad.... He said he bit into one, had to spit it out and the burning was awful. I always wear a latex glove when using them. The last thing you want to do is take a leak right after you are handling a chopped up pepper.
 

LazerBeakShiek

Well-known member
My habaneros are growing . Last year my peppers weren't that hot. My new ones are coming in.
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Last year i did hot radishes too. Those were breath taking hot. My habaneros had no kick last time. These were HOT!
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Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
For years, I've been making a salsa verde with lots of habaneros for extra heat. I ordered up a bag of dried chiltepin peppers for my next batch - see what they'll do for my salsa.

Trying to find the Scoville on habaneros and chiltepins, they range all over the place. I've heard and read the chiltepins are hotter than habaneros but a lot of what I'm finding is they're on the lower end of the habanero scale. Then again.. one account has the chiltepins at 20X habaneros. I dunno...

When mine arrive I'll chew on one and see for myself.
I've been wanting for some time to get my hands on some of those chilis! Little bity fellers. Supposedly you get an initial blast with the heat subsiding fairly quickly. An interesting characteristic to explore. Infuse honey for sopapillas, mixed with strawberry preserves for a dollop in a bowl of chili beans, mixed with a saline solution in an eyedropper! Yowza!

Let me know what you think once they arrive.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
For years, I've been making a salsa verde with lots of habaneros for extra heat. I ordered up a bag of dried chiltepin peppers for my next batch - see what they'll do for my salsa.

Trying to find the Scoville on habaneros and chiltepins, they range all over the place. I've heard and read the chiltepins are hotter than habaneros but a lot of what I'm finding is they're on the lower end of the habanero scale. Then again.. one account has the chiltepins at 20X habaneros. I dunno...

When mine arrive I'll chew on one and see for myself.

I've been wanting for some time to get my hands on some of those chilis! Little bity fellers. Supposedly you get an initial blast with the heat subsiding fairly quickly. An interesting characteristic to explore. Infuse honey for sopapillas, mixed with strawberry preserves for a dollop in a bowl of chili beans, mixed with a saline solution in an eyedropper! Yowza!

Let me know what you think once they arrive.
Man! That sounds tasty. The strawberry preserves dollop in a bowl of chili beans sounds like some kinda Hawaiian Ice concoction.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
I've been wanting for some time to get my hands on some of those chilis! Little bity fellers. Supposedly you get an initial blast with the heat subsiding fairly quickly. An interesting characteristic to explore. Infuse honey for sopapillas, mixed with strawberry preserves for a dollop in a bowl of chili beans, mixed with a saline solution in an eyedropper! Yowza!

Let me know what you think once they arrive.
They finally arrived. Interesting little things. I could instantly catch their fruity aroma through the bag before opening. I pulled one out, licked my finger and got no taste. I wet my finger more and rubbed the pepper and tasted my finger again.. I could barely taste it. Then I squeezed the pepper - it's dried and crumbles apart revealing it's seeds - and licked it. That did it! Those seeds tasted good! I popped the whole thing in my mouth and chewed.

WooHoo! Instant burn on the end of my tongue, then the back of my throat. It's plenty hot - hot as or hotter than the orange habaneros I've been getting at the grocery store. The burn lasted about 2 minutes before fading away, but as it faded I broke out into a sweat. About 7 minutes from first taste, the burn is gone from my throat but still tingling my tongue tip. Almost 20 minutes later I'm still sweating, but almost no burn. Me likey.

I usually add 6-8 habaneros to 1 Qt. of my salsa verde. Now I'll have to experiment with how many of these little devils it's going to take to equal that. Not too many, I expect.

Chiltepin Peppers.jpg
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
They finally arrived. Interesting little things. I could instantly catch their fruity aroma through the bag before opening. I pulled one out, licked my finger and got no taste. I wet my finger more and rubbed the pepper and tasted my finger again.. I could barely taste it. Then I squeezed the pepper - it's dried and crumbles apart revealing it's seeds - and licked it. That did it! Those seeds tasted good! I popped the whole thing in my mouth and chewed.

WooHoo! Instant burn on the end of my tongue, then the back of my throat. It's plenty hot - hot as or hotter than the orange habaneros I've been getting at the grocery store. The burn lasted about 2 minutes before fading away, but as it faded I broke out into a sweat. About 7 minutes from first taste, the burn is gone from my throat but still tingling my tongue tip. Almost 20 minutes later I'm still sweating, but almost no burn. Me likey.

I usually add 6-8 habaneros to 1 Qt. of my salsa verde. Now I'll have to experiment with how many of these little devils it's going to take to equal that. Not too many, I expect.

View attachment 110912
Cool. I like the way they retain their color after drying. Interesting recommendation, wash before consuming. Kind of defeats the purpose of drying, and can't grind dry in a coffee mill after "washing". I'm not trying to turn anyone off from dried chilies, the wife told me she saw a cautionary vid on dried peppers in a warehouse....had rats climbing all over a bin full. I consider it, but ultimately put it out of my head and move forward without washing. The hotter the better?....the higher the capsicum the better the pest control? Dunno. An interesting tidbit, birds lack the vulnerable receptors and can consume hot chilies(and seeds) no problem. Some bird seed suppliers include hot chili seeds in the mix to ward off feeder raiders, squirrels and such...to include rats, I reckon. It is what it is, carpe diem, damn the torpedoes, and all that rot.

What's your Salsa Verde?

I don't typically use dried peppers in salsa, or not much. If i'm going for it, I usually make good use of breaking out the blender(at times for a small batch or quacamole I may go the molcajete route(a mortar and pestle). Long post warning....

If i'm going to bother, I make 4 salsas. Forgive, but I don't measure, so no precise measurements are/will be provided. If you're going to break out the blender, go for it. Variety is good fun.

1 (because it takes time for the flavors to marry, I make Salsa Blanco 1st. Mayo goes in a bowl. A touch of vinegar, taste, should be a little tangy. A touch of milk, just enough to thin the consistency, but also lightens the mayo taste. Now no longer has an evident mayo taste, sort of. In goes granulated garlic, ground cumin seed, Mexican oregano(or italian if that is all you have on hand), ground hot chilie such as cayenne. Done. Cover and refrigerate for at least an hour. Not always, but sometimes I might add a pinch of sugar...a bit of sweet and sour element.

Ingredients and what not for the other 3: A can of whole tomatoes(fresh seems to make the salsa roja too thin, and canned tomatoes are fine having been picked at the peak of ripeness for canning. Don't use canned "tomato sauce".). 4-5 roma tomatoes(number depends on size). About 10-15 tomatillos(depending on size). Fresh serrano chilies. White onion. whole garlic cloves. Cilantro. Dried Chili de Arbol chilies.

2) I like my salsa roja pretty basic. Cut each whole canned tomato in half to remove seeds and excess water, and into the blender as you go. Peel fresh peeled garlic cloves and crush once with the side of a chef knife, into the blender. Personally, I don't over do it, but I like a fair amount of garlic. In goes fresh serrano chilies. I may seed half the total amount of chilies. I want heat, but I also want everyone to be able to enjoy the salsa. Jalapenos will be fine if that is all you have on hand, they are less hot. In goes some cilantro, stems and all. A touch of salt(keeping in mind some canned tomatoes may already have salt). Put the (blender) spurs to it. Taste test for seasoning(salt). Keep in mind, it's salsa roja(red). so you go too heavy on the greens it's gonna be green. No good, ymmv.

Heat oven to about 425, and sauce pan of water on top to a boil. On a cookie sheet goes all of the romas, a little over half of the tomatillos, 1/4-1/3 of the white onion, and several whole UNPEELED garlic cloves to roast. Into the boiling water goes the remainder tomatillos and 1/3 slice of a white onion.

Important!: place several chili de arbol on the cookie sheet. It only takes a short time, don't burn. Less than a minute. Little hints of dark color is fine, even desirable. But don't burn the fucking chilies! Some Moles call for burnt shit, but this ain't it...that's another post in the tl;dr chronicles

3) Go in this order, puhlease. Salsa Verde. Once the boiled tomas are soft, throw in the blender with the boiled(softened) onion. In goes cilantro and peeled roasted garlic. Don't put the spurs to it! Pulse, should be a little chunky. Pretty simple, no heat, refreshing. Can also be mashed with avocado for a type of quac( but I typically like my quac with nothing but avocado and lime). Can also add Mexican Crema to the guac...but anyway!

4) No need to rinse the blender. Salsa Taqueria!...my favorite. This one brings the heat. Into the blender goes all of the roasted stuff....tomates, tomatillos, onion, peeled roasted garlic...cilantro if you like, I don't. Chilies de Arbol!.....if you're scared say you're scared. But to be clear, food is meant to be enjoyed, go crazy to your hearts content, don't do stupid shit with chilies. This shit is gooood, should be a rich deep reddish brown color.

I lied, I also make a 5th while i'm at it, a simple pico de gallo(beak of the rooster)...diced tomatoes, jalapeno(or serrano), white onion, cilantro, garlic, pinch of salt, squeeze of lime. A 6th? On occasion, a drained can of pickled jalapenos and a handful of cilantro, and into the blender, that's it.

A little advice. (hot!)Chilis are best enjoyed with food. Jack shit up on occasion. I don't necessarily discourage it, and although I have and will, don't go biting into a whole habanero or doing other fool hardy stuff. And for God's sake, don't trick people for laughs. If it's in your mouth, don't spit it out!....you'll get it all over your lips. If you think it is overwhelming.......be still, literally. Don't fight it, don't scrape your tongue with your teeth or any other futile nonsense. Be still. Close your eyes, bow your head, and let it burn.....it's a wonderful thing. Experience it for as long as it takes. In time your natural pain killers will come to the rescue...to a certain extent.

Enjoy them chilies. brother. Never thought about ordering chilies, I might give it a go.

/tl;dr
 
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spantini

COO of me, inc.
Cool. I like the way they retain their color after drying. Interesting recommendation, wash before consuming. Kind of defeats the purpose of drying, and can't grind dry in a coffee mill after "washing". I'm not trying to turn anyone off from dried chilies, the wife told me she saw a cautionary vid on dried peppers in a warehouse....had rats climbing all over a bin full. I consider it, but ultimately put it out of my head and move forward without washing. The hotter the better?....the higher the capsicum the better the pest control? Dunno. An interesting tidbit, birds lack the vulnerable receptors and can consume hot chilies(and seeds) no problem. Some bird seed suppliers include hot chili seeds in the mix to ward off feeder raiders, squirrels and such...to include rats, I reckon. It is what it is, carpe diem, damn the torpedoes, and all that rot.

What's your Salsa Verde? ...

BrUHh-ther! Bring the heat! 🥵🤣

I'm just experimenting with my salsa at this point because I needed some with no or extremely low sodium.

My basic ingredients are:

3 lbs Tomatillos
4 Garlic cloves - grated
1 Bunch Fresh Cilantro (stems and all)
1/2 Bunch Fresh Flat Parsley (stems and all)
3/4 oz. Fresh Basil (stems and all)
7.5 oz. Can Chipotles in Adobo Sauce
3 Fresh Limes (Juice of)
24 Chiltepin Peppers - crushed (previously used 6-8 Habaneros)

My first two salsas, I included a white onion. I also roasted the tomatillos, onion and garlic - just till charred a bit. When the third batch was needed, I didn't have time to do the roasting so I skipped that part. For some reason, I could barely taste the difference, so now I leave out the onion and skip the roasting. I used to use a blender but the jar was just too small and I had to make it in two sections then blend them at the end. Got rid of that and got me a Cuisinart processor (magic machine) which can handle twice the amounts. I don't need anything liquified, and the processor leaves it just chunky enough.

First I halve the limes, set them into a bowl face-up and microwave for 2 minutes - let them cool while prepping the rest (nuking them extracts their vitamin-C as well as most of their juice, squeezing gets the rest out). I cut the small tomatillos in half and quarter the large ones, I throw them all in my food processor and pulse them down, then add remaining ingredients and blend for 30 seconds. Makes a little more than enough to fill an old mayo jar.

The color varies with each batch. Everything is nice and green until the chipotles with adobo go in, then it goes greenish-brown - but seems to get greener as it sits in the fridge for some days.
________________________

I might play around with your recipes, except for the avocado. They're loaded with potassium.. another goodie I need to stay away from these days.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
Here I go again......

Have you ever experimented with what is known in Chinese culinary arts as "Mala". It is the combination of heat from hot peppers with numbing from "Sichuan pepper corns". They are not pepper corns at all, but the buds of the prickly ash plant. Doesn't sound enticing, but it's almost the sensation of placing your tongue on a 9 volt battery. The 2 do a little dance with one another. You can go real balls to the wall with the peppers. It's awesome.

You can find sichuan pepper corns in an asian or international market. Might be labeled "prickly ash". Of the 2 types you might see, get the pink. Sort through. Much of it will be bud free of (black) seed. Sort to get rid of the black seed, very hard and inedible....even if ground it can still result in a kind of sandy texture.

If interested I can guide through a recipe of sorts. My own through trial and error. All said I like my creations better than the majority i've had at "Chinese" restaurants. Most of that shit is very generic and bland, imo. Basically, the way I go, involves chopped ginger and garlic, dried peppers in the stir fry, and a sauce.....sauce balanced in complexity to access different receptors in the palate......salty, sweet, sour, etc. Make the sauce (with added corn starch to thicken....corn starch doesn't fully do it's thing until boiling hot), add at the end. You'll need rice vinegar, milder in acidity than our cider or white vinegar. A small amount of sesame oil off heat at the end....small amount, a little goes a long way! If in the asian market you might also want to get get some chili bean paste, good stuff. Others to try, oyster sauce, hoisin sauce.

Dang, making myself hungry.
 

spantini

COO of me, inc.
Here I go again......

Have you ever experimented with what is known in Chinese culinary arts as "Mala". It is the combination of heat from hot peppers with numbing from "Sichuan pepper corns". They are not pepper corns at all, but the buds of the prickly ash plant. Doesn't sound enticing, but it's almost the sensation of placing your tongue on a 9 volt battery. The 2 do a little dance with one another. You can go real balls to the wall with the peppers. It's awesome.

You can find sichuan pepper corns in an asian or international market. Might be labeled "prickly ash". Of the 2 types you might see, get the pink. Sort through. Much of it will be bud free of (black) seed. Sort to get rid of the black seed, very hard and inedible....even if ground it can still result in a kind of sandy texture.

If interested I can guide through a recipe of sorts. My own through trial and error. All said I like my creations better than the majority i've had at "Chinese" restaurants. Most of that shit is very generic and bland, imo. Basically, the way I go, involves chopped ginger and garlic, dried peppers in the stir fry, and a sauce.....sauce balanced in complexity to access different receptors in the palate......salty, sweet, sour, etc. Make the sauce (with added corn starch to thicken....corn starch doesn't fully do it's thing until boiling hot), add at the end. You'll need rice vinegar, milder in acidity than our cider or white vinegar. A small amount of sesame oil off heat at the end....small amount, a little goes a long way! If in the asian market you might also want to get get some chili bean paste, good stuff. Others to try, oyster sauce, hoisin sauce.

Dang, making myself hungry.
I'm not familiar with "Mala" but Sichuan pepper corns are on my 'to get' list - thanks for the tip on the pink ones. I really have to watch it with some of the Asian sauces as they can be so loaded with sodium. I was doing some modified stir-fried recipes last year with regular cabbage, fresh ginger, toasted sesame oil, white wine vinegar, fresh garlic along with various fresh peppers and small quantities of beef.
 
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