What books have you been reading lately?

Orson

Well-known member
I know a part time author of fiction books. Some cracking stories. Lots of short stories with a twist. Nothing about music though.
 

60's guy

Active member
"Turn It Up" by Ron Eckerman, it's about Lynyrd Skynyrd. He was their tour manager and is a plane crash survivor.
Thanks for that recommendation!
I have read Clapton...the autobiography. It's a good read especially that he actually wrote the book hisself while he was still touring in between concert appearances.
I have also read Gregg Allman's book "My Cross To Bear" which is an eye opener for anyone interested to read about the beginning of the band and the years that followed.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
Rand McNally's Complete Book of Fishermen's Knots, Fishing Rigs, and How To Use Them

I've read it before, several times, in fact. It's fun and informative to dig it out from time to time to try something new. Ready made hi/lo bottom rigs can be a pain in the ass getting all tangled up in a tackle box, and if you get hung-up several times you can lose rigs & run short of gear. So within the last year I figured it was about time I learned to make my own. Page 130, Dropper Loop(also called Blood Dropper Loop) for the win. Another benefit, unlike the ready made store bought bottom rigs which accommodate 2 hooks, making your own you can have 2, or 3, or really as many hooks as you wish. While in making your own rigs you won't have a potential tangled mess of ready-mades in your tackle box, you of course do need a spool of line, swivels & snap swivels......and reading glasses! Gotta have a pair of fish stank readers in the box(not to read the book, but to tie your rigs). ymmv
 

Eric V

Inquiring mind wants to know
Thanks for that recommendation!
I have read Clapton...the autobiography. It's a good read especially that he actually wrote the book hisself while he was still touring in between concert appearances.
I have also read Gregg Allman's book "My Cross To Bear" which is an eye opener for anyone interested to read about the beginning of the band and the years that followed.
Sounds like a couple of good books
 

Eric V

Inquiring mind wants to know
"Turn It Up" by Ron Eckerman, it's about Lynyrd Skynyrd. He was their tour manager and is a plane crash survivor.
I should have said "was a plane crash survivor", he died from leukemia in 2011 I think it was.
 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
I'm reading two at the moment, my "Lou Read" is "Pelé ~ My life and the beautiful game." I looked long and hard for it. I actually used to have it, I bought it in 1978. I remembered a couple of things about it and because he's written a few books on his life {as well as there being a few books written by others on his life}, I tried to use those things I remembered to identify which book it was that I wanted. I'd already bought the wrong one a couple of times. I still couldn't find those things so I had to take the chance. Once I saw the bit about him visiting the local prostitute, and particularly the sentence about Uruguay supposedly being duck soup in 1950, I knew I had bought the right one ! Thus far, it's really good. I think I bought it back in 2017 or 18.
The other book I'm reading is "A Woman's place: House Churches In Earliest Christianity" by the Catholic feminist, Carolyn Osiek. It's an interesting book that I got because it covers two subjects I've been doing a lot of research on. I do like the book, but it's a bit misleading in its title. Maybe I'll catch what I see as the missing nuances by the time I finish. It's taking a while to read because it's not riveting. Some of it is hard work. I've dropped it in the bath twice already ! I've been on it since June or July. But I shall persevere because it does have lots of important info and a valuable context.
 

Orson

Well-known member
I'm reading two at the moment, my "Lou Read" is "Pelé ~ My life and the beautiful game." I looked long and hard for it. I actually used to have it, I bought it in 1978. I remembered a couple of things about it and because he's written a few books on his life {as well as there being a few books written by others on his life}, I tried to use those things I remembered to identify which book it was that I wanted. I'd already bought the wrong one a couple of times. I still couldn't find those things so I had to take the chance. Once I saw the bit about him visiting the local prostitute, and particularly the sentence about Uruguay supposedly being duck soup in 1950, I knew I had bought the right one ! Thus far, it's really good. I think I bought it back in 2017 or 18.
The other book I'm reading is "A Woman's place: House Churches In Earliest Christianity" by the Catholic feminist, Carolyn Osiek. It's an interesting book that I got because it covers two subjects I've been doing a lot of research on. I do like the book, but it's a bit misleading in its title. Maybe I'll catch what I see as the missing nuances by the time I finish. It's taking a while to read because it's not riveting. Some of it is hard work. I've dropped it in the bath twice already ! I've been on it since June or July. But I shall persevere because it does have lots of important info and a valuable context.
What are the subjects you are researching and why GT?
 

CrowsofFritz

Flamingo!
I really want to get Recording the Beatles but I can’t justify paying $2000 for it. They said they would reprint it but that was 3 years ago.
 

60's guy

Active member
"Turn It Up" by Ron Eckerman, it's about Lynyrd Skynyrd. He was their tour manager and is a plane crash survivor.
I purchased the book and read it.
The book is a fairly good read for anyone interested in reading about how life on the road with Lynyrd Skynrd affected Ron Eckerman.
Although Eckerman perfectly wrote of his friendship with Ronnie and telling stories of his attempts to reign in the insanity of Allen Collins and Leon Wilkerson, the book would have been much better if he had chosen to write more about the friendship he had with every band member.
 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
The other book I'm reading is "A Woman's place: House Churches In Earliest Christianity" by the Catholic feminist, Carolyn Osiek......I shall persevere because it does have lots of important info and a valuable context
I'm glad to say, I've finished it. It was a hard slog, but I'd recommend it to anyone that is looking into those kinds of subjects.
Right now, I'm still on the Pelé one and I've started reading Ric Lee's autobiography. He was the drummer with Ten Years After, and he's a very entertaining writer. Even though it's a few hundred pages, I needed something light after Carolyn !
What are the subjects you are researching and why GT?
As a Christian, I've long been interested in how the modern church has come so far away from its New Testament roots in so many ways and used the bible to justify virtually all of its moves.
It's a huge topic, I know that few agree with me {that is, relatively few}, but in terms of the way in which 'church' is often set up hierarchically, without the input of the entire congregation contributing via the Spirit, after looking into this specifically since 2006, but having had proddings since the late 80s, I think we've got it wrong. Christ summed matters up when he made the observation that there were those that strained out a gnat....but swallowed camels ! That's been us for most of the church's existence.
Tied up in this has been the side lining of women {interestingly, this is not some modern feminist thing, because it simply did not happen in the New Testament period when the gospels, narratives and epistles were written} and the emergence of the church as an organization, as opposed to an organism. There's actually quite a few church-related things that I'm ongoing researching.
I really want to get Recording the Beatles but I can’t justify paying $2000 for it. They said they would reprint it but that was 3 years ago
I was a late convert to the internet {2004} and in 2005, put my name down to buy the book. At the time, it was going for $100. I thought that it was a heck of a lot of money then, plus postage to the UK, so I declined to buy it. I could kick myself now ! Every couple of years, I'd look into whether there may be any second hand copies floating about, and it was then that I saw the prices increasing.
Funnily enough, as the years have gone by, I've found myself not really caring any more. If I saw it for close to that original $100, I might consider buying it, but like you, I'm not shelling out big bucks for it. There's a couple of copies on Ebay going for £305 {$471} and £399 {$547} right now but even that's way too much for a book that, for me, is only of mild interest. I have frequently asked myself if I really care that much about the specific equipment used on their music, and the answer is always 'no'. I have loads of books on the band and much of the info is actually among them, although never in one concise place, like this book.
Maybe HR.com will send me a copy for my birthday instead of the birthday greeting I get ! 😜 🤓 🤪
The book I'd really like to get my hands on is the book that came with the 2018 release of the White album. But that, the Pepper one and the Abbey Road one aren't sold separately and I don't want the CDs. I'm not a completist. One copy of each album is fine for me.
 

Orson

Well-known member
As a Christian, I've long been interested in how the modern church has come so far away from its New Testament roots in so many ways and used the bible to justify virtually all of its moves.
It's a huge topic, I know that few agree with me {that is, relatively few}, but in terms of the way in which 'church' is often set up hierarchically, without the input of the entire congregation contributing via the Spirit, after looking into this specifically since 2006, but having had proddings since the late 80s, I think we've got it wrong. Christ summed matters up when he made the observation that there were those that strained out a gnat....but swallowed camels ! That's been us for most of the church's existence.
Tied up in this has been the side lining of women {interestingly, this is not some modern feminist thing, because it simply did not happen in the New Testament period when the gospels, narratives and epistles were written} and the emergence of the church as an organization, as opposed to an organism. There's actually quite a few church-related things that I'm ongoing researching.
I don't knock what people want to believe. Everybody should have that choice. I do watch with interest how religions/organisations use their methods to 'collect' new followers. I find that more interesting than the religion it's self.
 
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60's guy

Active member
As a Christian, I've long been interested in how the modern church has come so far away from its New Testament roots in so many ways and used the bible to justify virtually all of its moves.
Firstly, a "modern church" is in existence for a singular generation of parishioners. 70 to 100 years perhaps.
Secondly, "modern churches" continually change or relax church rules and interpretations of biblical philosophy that parishioners reject.
A conundrum certainly.
 

DM60

Well-known member
As a Christian, I've long been interested in how the modern church has come so far away from its New Testament roots in so many ways and used the bible to justify virtually all of its moves.
It's a huge topic, I know that few agree with me {that is, relatively few}, but in terms of the way in which 'church' is often set up hierarchically, without the input of the entire congregation contributing via the Spirit, after looking into this specifically since 2006, but having had proddings since the late 80s, I think we've got it wrong. Christ summed matters up when he made the observation that there were those that strained out a gnat....but swallowed camels ! That's been us for most of the church's existence.
Tied up in this has been the side lining of women {interestingly, this is not some modern feminist thing, because it simply did not happen in the New Testament period when the gospels, narratives and epistles were written} and the emergence of the church as an organization, as opposed to an organism. There's actually quite a few church-related things that I'm ongoing researching.
History of the World Christian Movement: Earliest Christianity to 1453, Dale T Irvin, Scott W Sunquist is a good start. The Canon of Scripture, F. F. Bruce is another very good book.

These are pretty good. I had the same questions and that is why I have read so much on the subject, to include European history. They sort of go together.
 

Orson

Well-known member
Firstly, a "modern church" is in existence for a singular generation of parishioners. 70 to 100 years perhaps.
Secondly, "modern churches" continually change or relax church rules and interpretations of biblical philosophy that parishioners reject.
A conundrum certainly.
Whats a modern church?
 

MadAudio

Damned if I do
I just finished "Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of The Beatles" by Geoff Emerick. Killer read even if he's a bit harsh on George for awhile. BTW, it was the first book I have read since I got my cataract surgeries done.
 

MadAudio

Damned if I do
I'm now into volume one of a four-book set of The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell.
 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
I just finished "Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of The Beatles" by Geoff Emerick. Killer read even if he's a bit harsh on George for awhile. BTW, it was the first book I have read since I got my cataract surgeries done.
How are your eyes doing after the surgery ? Did you notice improvement straightaway ? I'm going to be facing the cataract thing in a few years.
I read the Geoff Emerick book some years back. Like you, I thought he was really harsh towards George {actually, both Georges} and revealed himself to be a bit of a Paul fanboi. Mind you, George Martin and John Lennon were also kind of harsh/contemptuous towards George in their time. Aroud the time I read it, there was a spate of books from or involving engineers that had worked with the Beatles, such as "Abbey Road to Ziggy Stardust" by Ken Scott, "John Lennon called me Normal" by Norman Smith {rare as hens teeth, that one}, plus the two "Behind the glass" books as well as "Good Vibrations ~ a history of record production." There's also Glyn Johns' autobiography.
 

Mickster

Well-known member
Ive been reading the Paul McCartney book "The Life". It's a VERY long book...and a bit tedious to read...but is worth it. Even though we know most of the history of the Beatles.....the book provides some detail and prospective that is different....and likely colored by McCartney. The very early days are particularly interesting.

I was also given the James Patterson book "The Last Days Of John Lennon" but haven't gotten to it yet. People know I'm a Beatles fan so they give me Beatles gifts. I'm also a big Grisham fan.

Mick
 

MadAudio

Damned if I do
How are your eyes doing after the surgery ? Did you notice improvement straightaway ? I'm going to be facing the cataract thing in a few years.
I read the Geoff Emerick book some years back. Like you, I thought he was really harsh towards George {actually, both Georges} and revealed himself to be a bit of a Paul fanboi. Mind you, George Martin and John Lennon were also kind of harsh/contemptuous towards George in their time. Aroud the time I read it, there was a spate of books from or involving engineers that had worked with the Beatles, such as "Abbey Road to Ziggy Stardust" by Ken Scott, "John Lennon called me Normal" by Norman Smith {rare as hens teeth, that one}, plus the two "Behind the glass" books as well as "Good Vibrations ~ a history of record production." There's also Glyn Johns' autobiography.
The right eye went off without a hitch, and yes I could tell the difference immediately, especially colors being more vivid. During the procedure for the left eye, I started moving while under the anesthesia just as the surgeon had the scalpel to my eye. He had the presence of mind to pull his hand back, but he told me it took a lot longer than usual. Vision was wonky for a few weeks, but is now just as good as the other. My distance vision is perfect, and I only need regular old reading glasses for close up (as I could not afford the super-duper new lenses that correct everything).

Thanks for the recos!
 

Orson

Well-known member
Ive been reading the Paul McCartney book "The Life". It's a VERY long book...and a bit tedious to read...but is worth it. Even though we know most of the history of the Beatles.....the book provides some detail and prospective that is different....and likely colored by McCartney. The very early days are particularly interesting.

I was also given the James Patterson book "The Last Days Of John Lennon" but haven't gotten to it yet. People know I'm a Beatles fan so they give me Beatles gifts. I'm also a big Grisham fan.

Mick
I find McCartney interesting in many ways Mick.

Lennon became a pain in the rear throughout the 70's which is something overlooked today. Ringo drank and spent his time hell raising having fun. I'm not sure what George did.

But McCartney pulled himself up from a drunken oblivion and just got on with it and 'proved' he could do it without the others. Living on the farm at Mull in Scotland.
 
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