Singing review

TalismanRich

Well-known member
This is the original version. Its meant to be a cabaret style performance (hence the plonky piano style that Rob disliked). I don't think it's their best work, they have many other tracks that are better. I don't think the singer does a great job in the real track, either.

As for Nifer's rendition, it's still off pitch in lots of spots. As others have suggestedvshe really should try to find a vocal teacher. If she can't hear the off pitch notes, then she'll never be able to correct them.

 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
Can you comment on my new recording ?
There's some nice improvement there, Nifer. I like the way you attempt some falsetto {high~ish notes} and some of the long notes, you sustain pretty well.
You still have a long way to go, but not as long as you did the very first time.
You are definitely getting better and I admire your determination. If you ever feel discouraged, just remember that you have come a long way, so continue and keep especially working on your breathing. You probably know this, but there are some useful exercises that can be found all over the internet. Try some more.
 

grimtraveller

If only for a moment.....
And one other thing, Nifer. We barely know anything about you. What country you live in, do you have any equipment, are you able to sing in private or are you surrounded by family all the time or neighbours, what do you want to do with your singing, what do you think of the things we have said so far, do you think you are improving, etc, etc.
Talk to us. It's easier to engage when there's a two-way conversation going on.
 

LazerBeakShiek

200M Subscribers
You know, its my opinion that anyone can sing. Baring any medical disability. Nifer, has shown enough interest and didn't give up. If she puts in the time...why not?

A pitch correct VST could provide a guide to compare with your original. That will help you advance too.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
Rich - thanks for the clip - I totally love that one. The band are really clever, unlike the version used for the backing on the one we're talking about here, where the piano is totally unsympathetic.In fairness - she picks a really, really hard style to even attempt - the video clip is a masterclass in a band gelling with the singer, who really gets what is happening - the slips and slides in rhythm, and tempo. Not every singer could switch from solid repetitive beats to the syncopated stuff in that clip. I'd love to see the tempo track you'd need to create in a DAW if you wanted to work on it. I tried a quick play along on my double bass - it was not pretty!


Lazer is quite right - anyone can sing, the question though, is how well? I hate opera singers doing pop. I hate pop singers doing opera badly on TV and I hate military bands trying to play groove music, and I hate trying to play my bass in a military band with an angry conductor doing lazerbeam eyes at me.

We need to find a style we are comfy with - then progress happens.
 

Nifer

New member
Thanks everyone for your comments and analysis.
I am in my 20s, I'm French and I teach English to French pupils.
I have no experience in singing, I am just learning by myself.
Recently I've read and watched videos about the CVT singing method (Complete Vocal Technique) and it helps me a lot.
I don't really intend to be a professional, but I just wanted to know your opinion about my progress, and if I can start to sing in a music band (as a leisure time) or if it is too early for me to be on stage.
 

rob aylestone

Well-known member
The stage thing is something you will either love or hate, irrespective of your voice.

If you are learning to sing without any input from a friend or teacher you trust - then it is hard, but one thing you need to do is find music to sing that gives you a start. From your examples - your pitch in general is OK, but you have trouble going from one note to another when the interval is further away - you miss the note. Question. Did you know you missed or did you not? If you heard what we did, then practice will fix it, but if you did not hear it then teaching yourself is a problem.

Let's assume you can work out that you can manage (for example) to go from say C to F or G reliably, or from D to G or A, or go a bit higher and do G to D or E, then find songs that do not push that maximum. A good exercise is to do octaves - can you go up and down without missing the note? The more difficult intervals, if we use C as a starting note, are the A, the Bb and the B natural. sitting with a keyboard and practicing until your intervals are really under control means you're ready to perform.

If you sing on stage, your tone, your attitude and what you appear to be count for a lot. I don't mean the sexist stuff, but do you look like a singer - do you stand right, and do you know how to work the microphone, and most importantly can you chat to the audience. If you get them on your side by letting your personality show, they will happily forgive a few mistakes. The old jazz rule - if you play a blatantly wrong note, keep it going and make it a feature and not an accident. Pick your set list that gives you a chance to chat between numbers to kind of recover.

Last thing - you need to be able to hear your voice. In the band we all sing, all the time - 4 separate parts and being able to hear yourself, the music and perhaps the others is absolutely critical. The old folk singers used to put a cupped hand to one ear to try to get the clues - the piano, or the track if you are using them. I once was at a festival where the front of house PA guy had got the bass and the guitar mixed up so my monitor had a rotten twangy guitar in it, somebody else voices and none of me or my bass. I gave up trying to get him to sort it - I'd point at my bass and indicate 'up' and the guitar, not my bass would get louder. The upshot was I played one whole song in E instead of Eb. Ot must have ben horrendous, but I couldn't hear it and thought I'd been spot on. With a monitor with the right amount of me in it, I'd have realised from note 1! What sort of music will be in your set list?

I heard a band recently - the lead singer was the weak link. He could not go low, and he couldn't go high, so he had to wobble about in the limited range he had. His personality though, was really good, and though he was really a poor singer, he got away with it. My voice is accurate, in tune but bland. I am great as a BV singer or doing clever harmonies but my voice is just lacking character I guess!
 
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