Food gardening

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
I grew some peppers among them being habaneros back when I lived at the beach. I think it was a 4 pack, so I planted all 4. All 4 were heavy producers, loaded. Pretty plants and fruit. You can only eat so many and I planned on drying some, but never got around to it. As was reasonably predictable towards the end of growing season a hurricane was going to move through, which would have shredded anything still standing/producing. So I picked and bagged bunches of pretty orange habaneros and went around to neighbors. Not a single one wanted anything to do with them. With a hurricane coming I had too much on my plate in preparation to take time to dry them, so they sat. Most eventually went out to feed birds once it was cold out, the seeds. From my understanding birds are immune to the heat, or maybe some variety of birds, not sure.

My fruit trees seem to be doing great. It's possible one of my apple trees has some powder on it, powdery mildew maybe. I have copper fungicide I'll probably test before spraying the entire foliage. I'm just discovering and learning about a weird thing called Apple Cedar Rust which might be a problem in the future. Apparently cedar and apple trees don't play well together within 5 miles of one another(wtf?). I'm not cutting down all of my cedar trees. What I'm seeing is a scheduled 3 time application of a fungicide to the apple trees once spring time hits.

I cut a 10x12 top layer of turf "grass", surrounded it with 5' fencing, and the wife no-till planted Collards yesterday. She says they'll do alright, I'm just hoping the cold weather and frost/snow don't get 'em.

I've thoughts of getting hold of some tasty chunks of pork, salt curing and cold smoking to add to the pot. Jowls, belly, maybe even some Turkey wings or necks. The way the economy and "supply chain" is going some stored away smoked meat might come in handy in a pot of collards, or beans, or whatever. If you like to eat meat, of any kind, best to get your fill now. Within a year the price of meat is going to skyrocket. Hell, shitty 73% lean hamburger about as white as my bare ass is already approaching $5 a pound.

Still preparing here for a fairly sizable plot of veg planting in the spring. The collards I just planted will be a test guestimation of the unamended soil here. I'm fairly certain it's shit, but we'll see.
 
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dogooder

Active member
I gave away about 20x what we kept. I made this big garden with my daughter and it way outproduced anything we could eat. Put most of it out
front in the driveway with a free sign and people stopped and took. We had a tip jar, didn't get much. We grew string beans, chili, habenaro, bell, green
and red, peppers. Different tomatoes. Pumpkin, cantaloupe, okra, brussel sprouts, mini eggplants, broccoli, cucumbers and squash. The okra looked like something out
of Jurassic Park. I had never seen them before, they are cool looking. Gave it all away. Next year I will look for some recipes. My soil is all red clay. The valley
I live in is called Poor Valley for that reason. The house I bought has an old barn and it was full of horseshit, a chicken coop full of chickenshit. I wheeledbarrowed
about 20 loads down to the garden and tilled that in. When I dug the holes I dug them large and put some good soil in. I have never canned anything and have to
learn how. Next year that will change.
 
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Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
I've never had much luck with bell peppers. They've always been on the small side and thin walled. Sure, some turned red, but it wasn't much to them. I need thick walled wonkers for the new flat top griddle next summer. There's nothing quite like the smell of griddled peppers and onions wafting through the air.

I don't have a lot of experience with Okre, but it can be too slimy for some's liking. I do know that when making a gumbo as a thickener you can use File Powder(ground sassafras leaf) or Okre. I've tried using both, but prefer to just thicken with a Roux. Easy and suits my taste as well. I do like breaded and deep fried Okre.

It sounds like you had a huge garden, dude. How much room was required for pumpkins? I'd love to grow some watermelon, cantaloupe, and pumpkins. But I'm not sure next year I'll be prepared for that amount of prepared garden space. I got deer out the bum and they'd probably eat most anything not enclosed in some sort of fencing.

I'm fixin' to make a scarecrow or 2 just for the fun of it, it being fall and all. The deer would probably look at those and yawn. I'm thinking solar powered and motion activated Jack in the Boxes. An army of them. That and trip wires, mortars, landmines. A crossbow, and why not...
dinner.
 

dogooder

Active member
The pumpkins were accidental. The prior November, after Halloween, I threw one of the pumpkins up in the garden. In the spring, she sprung. We wound up
having take 3/4s of it out. Way to big. What I am going to do this year with the pumpkins is just put them out in the field when Halloween is over and see
if they just grow in the field! The watermelons we planted were minis and about the size of cantaloupes.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
The remnants of the hurricane moved through late/overnight Friday. There was incredible movement up in the canopy of the large trees here, large Hickory, Tulip Poplar, and Oak right near the house. Coming here from the beach I am somewhat used to hurricanes, but it was unreal here around all of these trees and forested areas. Must admit, a bit unnerving, the movement and sound. The dog came out with me onto the porch around 2 am and was like oh hell no and wanted to immediately go back inside. Other than twigs and small branches no harm done by the high winds....except..

The cages on the 2 apple trees were off and had rolled all the way to the back of the yard/field. Crazy. Yet, I see no signs of damage on the trees from the cages being blown off. It's almost as if someone had lifted the cages straight up & off. Strange, maybe it was former owner of the property and now deceased old man Hodges who didn't like the cages(there have been some odd little quirky goings on lately such as I recall moving something later to find it is back in its original location). I had secured the cages on the Cherry and Fruit Cocktail trees with T posts, but I ran out of T posts and thought what the hell, the cages are pretty solid on the Apple trees and didn't worry about it. T posts are probably a bit overkill, so I'll pick up some tent stakes to secure the cages to the ground.

The sad little Collard plants seem to be doing somewhat okay in the little garden space where I removed the turf and erected some fencing to keep the deer at bay one afternoon. No digging, just planted right in the ground. We'll see what the unamended native soil has to offer, if the cold doesn't get them first. I mostly did it for the wife. She put a "Garden" sign on the little door, just to remind me in case I get a little confused given my advancing years.

I'm thinking Hazelnut trees. Plant 2, early spring. I love any kind of nut, and if the Apple trees produce well, which I don't see why they wouldn't, Apples and Hazelnuts will be a good pairing for baked goods. From what I am reading Hazelnuts are good in partial shade, which should work out well in certain locations on the property.

IMG_20221002_104642328_HDR.jpg

IMG_20221002_105830812_HDR.jpg
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
^^ Yeah, I need to get a little better driving the T posts straight into the ground. I think I hit a rock or two which caused a bit of a slant and thus some slack at the top of my fencing. I guess better slack at the top than the bottom in order to keep pesky critters such as rabbits and ground hogs off the wife's collards.

It's a learning experience, we'll see. I'm enjoying it. The wife likes to garden in her bare feet, says connection to the soil is good for the body and soul. I like the way she thinks.
 

LazerBeakShiek

Well-known member
page wont load Mick..

is there something where two trees cannot touch? Because my cherry tree contacted the tree above and the whole limb died.. WTF?
20221002_123654.jpg
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
page wont load Mick..

is there something where two trees cannot touch? Because my cherry tree contacted the tree above and the whole limb died.. WTF?
View attachment 121889

Page won't load? The pics?

I don't see why the limb would die because it was touching another tree limb. What kind of tree is the other?

Wow, that's a nice size cherry tree. Did you plant it? How long ago? I'm no expert by any stretch, but that cherry tree could benefit from some pruning to open up the center. Lack of air circulation could cause problems such as powdery mildew. It looks like maybe it's putting a lot of energy taking off in the center. If it was me I would consider getting rid of a lot of what's in the center to a funnel shape and letting it spread out horizontally. Promotes good air circulation and will be easier to maintain & harvest. It's going to be tough to force myself, but I plan to prune my trees while young-ish for horizontal rather than vertical growth. If I do need to spray for any reason in the future it'll make life easier on myself. Easier to access fruit as well.
 

LazerBeakShiek

Well-known member
No history on the cherry tree. I moved here in June. Now is the time to prune. Taking out the center seems like the way. Most of it is dead anyway.

You spray? What are you using to keep them going?
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
No history on the cherry tree. I moved here in June. Now is the time to prune. Taking out the center seems like the way. Most of it is dead anyway.

You spray? What are you using to keep them going?

I haven't sprayed anything yet.

I anticipate some time in the future I may have to spray a copper fungicide if I ever have problems with powdery mildew and the like. Keeping the center open for good air circulation could help in preventing a future problem, but it's always a possibility. I've also discovered that there is a thing called Apple Cedar Rust, which is spread between cedar trees and apple trees. It's crazy, they say the spores can spread up to 5 miles away. I'm not cutting down every cedar tree on the property, so there is a spraying schedule I will follow whether I see signs of a problem or not. Copper fungicide. There also may come a time when it might be advisible to spray with a Neem pest repellent. I want to enjoy the fruit trees I have planted with as little effort as possible. Keeping the tree more on a horizontal rather than vertical plane will assist in not only spraying but fruit harvest as well.

I've been watching a lot of vids on pruning. Man, some of these guys who know what they're doing do some heavy pruning, both for shape and the health of the trees. It's going to hurt cutting a lot of the growth that in my mind I want to see, but from what I am seeing it will be beneficial not only for myself but the trees as well. The trees I have purchased could produce fruit as early as the first year, but I think I am not going to allow it to happen in favor of the tree putting its energy towards getting well established for the long run. Maybe a few cherries. Maybe.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
Btw

That's pretty cool you got a free established Cherry tree. Did you get cherries this year? A lot of cherry trees require a pollinator, particularly the sweet varieties, from what I gather. The cherry tree I purchased, Stella!, is a sweet variety, but does not require a pollinator. I'm not done yet. Next year I may get another cherry for increased pollination and more abundant harvest, but will definitely be purchasing more trees. Hazelnut, probably peach, more berries.

An interesting thing: I have purchased all semi-dwarf trees. But whether semi-dwarf or particularly full size trees, you can 2 to a hole, or rather 2 very close but spaced to allow for trunk expansion as they grow, and it will stunt the height given that they somewhat compete with one another. Full sized trees, stunted so still manageable for upkeep and harvest. Pretty cool. I may try it. I'd love some pecan trees.
 

RFR

Well-known member
This is all new to me. All this maintenance.

Back in my youth we had 4 apple trees, two pear trees and one black cherry tree. Didn’t do shit to them. Every year they produced an over abundance of fruit.
Man,, I got sick of eating apple this and apple that. My mom even made apple butter.

The biggest maintenance was me picking the fruit and constantly making sure there wasn’t any lying on the ground. Wasps LOVE ripe pears.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
I'm not a huge Apple guy, until I am eating an Apple, "Hey, this is pretty good." I'll be eating a lot of apples in one way or another, that is if all goes well. I'm either going to purchase or make an Apple press to make cider. They say if/when society breaks down anything with an alcohol content will be a valuable asset. Or just get dronk, share warm cider with friends and relations come holiday season. Apples store well, as well. In cider. You need a lot of Apples to store them, in cider. Hard cider, the good stuff.

I've already spotted what could be powdery mildew on one Apple tree. I've yet to spray. I'll gather all leaves that fall off all the fruit trees and burn them to prevent any carry over in the spring. As is the common case, weakness invites attack and/or illness. It's my job to help the trees to stay strong, not by chance but by being a good steward of the blessing and gift of having them here, while I'm still here. Although it's been a dream to have fruit trees, in a way I don't own them. They belong to this property, for now I'm just the caretaker.

I'm 59 years old, man. At times i'm starting to feel it, my muscles, my bones. I'm experiencing I don't bounce back from what would otherwise in my younger days be a minor injury. It doesn't even have to be injury, just aches and pains for no apparent reason. Getting hurt, those aches and pains, it reduces quality of life, it can feed on itself. My stepfather developed a back issue, an extended time. The back injury compromised mobility. Compromised mobility resulted in a rather recent fall while doing the mundane task of checking the mailbox. Broke his femur which required surgery. Never recovered and died less than 2 months later. Life comes at you fast sometimes, or injury, or death.

At 59 soon to be 60 come March, my tree climbing days are over. I'm going to keep doing because I think doing can promote the ability to keep doing. Realistically I'm not a kid anymore, I gotta be smart about it. Work smarter, not harder. That includes pruning these trees so when I am 70, 75, whatever, I can still stand flat footed on the ground and enjoy what they provide. From what the doctor says, I have a heart thing, an electrical problem. Any day I could be dead before I hit the ground. Today is the day to enjoy life on this planet of such beauty, and all it has to offer. Today is the day, for as many as I have left.
 

Mick Doobie

Resist We Much
No history on the cherry tree. I moved here in June. Now is the time to prune. Taking out the center seems like the way. Most of it is dead anyway.

You spray? What are you using to keep them going?

Neglected to mention...and I'm still learning so take it for what it's worth.

Your Cherry tree has spent all summer sending nutrients from the root system to the canopy. In fall before or as the leaves drop it is sending all those nutrients back from the canopy to be stored in the root system. Of you prune at this time you may be robbing your tree of those nutrients.

Like I said, still learning, so research yourself.
 

dogooder

Active member
This is all new to me. All this maintenance.

Back in my youth we had 4 apple trees, two pear trees and one black cherry tree. Didn’t do shit to them. Every year they produced an over abundance of fruit.
Man,, I got sick of eating apple this and apple that. My mom even made apple butter.

The biggest maintenance was me picking the fruit and constantly making sure there wasn’t any lying on the ground. Wasps LOVE ripe pears.
I almost found that out the hard way recently.
 
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