Clapton and others

That's exactly what he was doing at the time. He found the Band's united, giving style in 1968 a world away from the intensity and ego of Cream. And let's face it, Ginger Baker's ego could be seen from space without a satellite ! And Jack Bruce wasn't exactly humble and modest back then because he knew he was pioneering something on the bass. Indeed, the very reason the band was called Cream was because they believed that's what they were, the cream of the talent on their respective instruments.
But Eric discovered that he wasn't up for improvising for 2 hours like Jack and Ginger were. So even Blind Faith turned out to be not what he wanted.
Clapton’s ego is a thousand times bigger than was Ginger’s. Ginger put the music above everything else. I hung out with Ginger and he was hilarious, engaging, and didn’t give a damn whether you were famous or not.
 
The so-called deity status came about over a specific photo that went viral in (I think) Creem music magazine in 1967 or so. There was wall in the UK where someone spray painted graffiti that said “Clapton Is God”. It made a big splash when it was published and at the Clapton was embarrassed by it, but later I think it went to his head. Apparently, he has always been a douche. He and Mayer make good bedfellows.
Correct! And that is in his Autibiography as well. It really was a great read.
 
Clapton did some great stuff, and has had a long career playing with the who’s who’s of the rock ‘legends’ as well as his solo career. He also did some mediocre stuff as well.
But by hook or crook, he’s definitely carved out a name for himself. No easy feat. He’s still here, and still touring at a time when many of his contemporaries have dropped off the face of the earth.

My only personal experience with him is that he flipped me off once. :LOL:

I’m cruising down Sunset Blvd one day going along with the flow of traffic. Up on my ass is a Mercedes 450SL with the top off. Driver was very impatient looked familiar, and was in a hurry. When he got an opening in traffic, he passed me and flipped me off.

I couldn’t stop laughing as I realized who it was.
What is it with celebrities driving in LA? :LOL:

Anyway here’s one of my favorites from the album “EC was here”.



Here’s a later live version with Steve Winwood.

 
Well, we have a different view on that. I'm not saying Eric isn't an egomaniac, but for me, Ginger Baker wrote the book on that.
Have you met either of them?

I’ve played onstage with Ginger and have been to his house. I never met Eric, but I did attend the last rehearsal before the first Clapton/Knopfler show and Eric was so lame at the rehearsal that I didn’t go to the show the next night even though I had free VIP tix.

I’ve also heard recordings of Clapton acting like a racist piece of shit, which I find odd if for no other reason than he is someone who made his entire career mis- appropriating black culture and music.

I have a friend who was a top rock photographer in the 60’s and 70’s in London and he has been on many photo shoots with everyone who was famous then, including the Beatles and the Stones. He said Clapton has always been the biggest a-hole in the business. I met John Mayer, and personally I think he is.

Having a big ego and being a total dick are not the same thing.
 
I think he's done some great stuff over the course of his career but there was a lot of crap as well. I could never understand how he got elevated to such a high status considering that his guitar playing skills are nothing special. I remember years ago someone told me I sounded like Clapton as a compliment. I changed my sound and technique as fast as I could.
 
I think he's done some great stuff over the course of his career but there was a lot of crap as well. I could never understand how he got elevated to such a high status considering that his guitar playing skills are nothing special. I remember years ago someone told me I sounded like Clapton as a compliment. I changed my sound and technique as fast as I could.
I wish you could love and laugh at a comment at the same time….lol.
 
I wish you could love and laugh at a comment at the same time
You can.....
I remember years ago, my Dad said something to me that I thought was quite deep but which I always had my doubts about. He said, "I'm never so offended by something that I can't be entertained by it."
I get what he was saying and for him, it was actually quite admirable, yet......
I’ve also heard recordings of Clapton acting like a racist piece of shit, which I find odd if for no other reason than he is someone who made his entire career mis- appropriating black culture and music
Eric did have some strange views at times. I recently read an interesting interview he did in 1968 for Rolling Stone where he says some things about how English people fell for the myth of the Black man with the huge dick, all in relation to Jimi Hendrix. So even at the height of his infatuation with what he regarded as Black music, he was saying bizarre things, although not entirely unfounded. Personally, I think the combination of discovering the woman he thought was his sister was actually his Mum, adulation and acid did for him.
Having a big ego and being a total dick are not the same thing
Of course they're not. Yet it is rather interesting how so often, they go hand in hand.
Have you met either of them?
I was hoping you'd ask that.
Nope, I have not met either. Have you met Donald Trump ? You have very strong opinions about him.
You yourself have admitted you've never met Eric, yet you think he's an arsehole or a dick.

The overwhelming majority of people that I have opinions about that I will discuss in the free space on a music forum, I have never met, neither am I likely to. Neither do I want to. I've never met the roadies and members of Vanilla Fudge that put bacon in the vulva of a groupie and filmed while a dog ate the bacon. But I sure as the sun is hot have opinions on those actions and the people who embarked on them.

Many of the people we talk about were dead before we were even alive. I don't need to have met Idi Amin or Adolf Hitler or Josef Stalin or Goebbels or Alexander the Great to have thoughts and opinions on them.

A mate of mine used to say "Speech is self-revealing." I've always thought that was quite a clever turn of phrase, not least because it is true. An old biblical proverb, "As a person thinks, so they are", aligned with something Jesus once said "Out of the abundance of what is in the heart, the mouth speaks", I've pretty much always found to be true, even in the days when I was atheist.

So to bring this back to Ginger Baker and Eric Clapton, I dig pieces of music they've been involved in. I've never had any desire to meet or know either man, even when Ginger was alive. But, like many other people in history, I find both to be interesting guys. And as a result, I go beyond their musicianship and music in order to discover more about them. I'm nosey that way. I'm interested in the opinions they've held at various junctures of their lives and how those opinions {and their lives at those times} may have informed the music they were making. And in those two men in particular, being White Englishmen who had an affinity for Black artists from both the USA and across Africa and their music, I'm interested in what was going on in their minds and lives at precisely the point my Mum and Dad and thousands of other Black people were pouring into England in the 1950s and the way they helped pave the path of change with their positive views of Black people in this country at a time when many people in England were anything but positive about Black people. I will not dismiss the fact that Ginger gave his son a Ghanaian name. In England, that is huge. I rate him for that.

While, over the years {going back to 1979, I'd say}, I have listened to what many of their peers and contemporaries have said about both men and taken those things, contradictory as they can be at times, into account, most of what I form my opinions with have come from Eric and Ginger's own psyches and mouths. And based over a 45-year period of listening to Ginger himself, he does not come over well to me. It doesn't mean I dislike him or am going to chuck away my Cream albums. But I'll tell you Scott, having read "Hellraiser" and taken in Ginger's own thoughts on his life up until that point, I can't unread all that and pretend he was all sweetness and light. That's gauging him by his own words, not Jack Bruce's ! And I feel pretty much the same about Eric too. I've read two of his autobiographies and he doesn't come over particularly well either.

Another old mate of mine told me that he refuses to read autobiographies because he felt they were self-serving attempts to make the subject in question look good. And I said to him "What's wrong with that ? At least you are getting the perspective of the person and not everyone else." While he had a point, he missed the simple reality that as a person writes about their life we, the readers, have the freedom to form opinions and conclusions based on what we read. And that's what I do. I don't need to meet them. I don't need to meet with people that knew them {although that has its + points too}. The words and perspectives of the person in question is sufficient.
 
You can.....
I remember years ago, my Dad said something to me that I thought was quite deep but which I always had my doubts about. He said, "I'm never so offended by something that I can't be entertained by it."
I get what he was saying and for him, it was actually quite admirable, yet......

Eric did have some strange views at times. I recently read an interesting interview he did in 1968 for Rolling Stone where he says some things about how English people fell for the myth of the Black man with the huge dick, all in relation to Jimi Hendrix. So even at the height of his infatuation with what he regarded as Black music, he was saying bizarre things, although not entirely unfounded. Personally, I think the combination of discovering the woman he thought was his sister was actually his Mum, adulation and acid did for him.

Of course they're not. Yet it is rather interesting how so often, they go hand in hand.

I was hoping you'd ask that.
Nope, I have not met either. Have you met Donald Trump ? You have very strong opinions about him.
You yourself have admitted you've never met Eric, yet you think he's an arsehole or a dick.

The overwhelming majority of people that I have opinions about that I will discuss in the free space on a music forum, I have never met, neither am I likely to. Neither do I want to. I've never met the roadies and members of Vanilla Fudge that put bacon in the vulva of a groupie and filmed while a dog ate the bacon. But I sure as the sun is hot have opinions on those actions and the people who embarked on them.

Many of the people we talk about were dead before we were even alive. I don't need to have met Idi Amin or Adolf Hitler or Josef Stalin or Goebbels or Alexander the Great to have thoughts and opinions on them.

A mate of mine used to say "Speech is self-revealing." I've always thought that was quite a clever turn of phrase, not least because it is true. An old biblical proverb, "As a person thinks, so they are", aligned with something Jesus once said "Out of the abundance of what is in the heart, the mouth speaks", I've pretty much always found to be true, even in the days when I was atheist.

So to bring this back to Ginger Baker and Eric Clapton, I dig pieces of music they've been involved in. I've never had any desire to meet or know either man, even when Ginger was alive. But, like many other people in history, I find both to be interesting guys. And as a result, I go beyond their musicianship and music in order to discover more about them. I'm nosey that way. I'm interested in the opinions they've held at various junctures of their lives and how those opinions {and their lives at those times} may have informed the music they were making. And in those two men in particular, being White Englishmen who had an affinity for Black artists from both the USA and across Africa and their music, I'm interested in what was going on in their minds and lives at precisely the point my Mum and Dad and thousands of other Black people were pouring into England in the 1950s and the way they helped pave the path of change with their positive views of Black people in this country at a time when many people in England were anything but positive about Black people. I will not dismiss the fact that Ginger gave his son a Ghanaian name. In England, that is huge. I rate him for that.

While, over the years {going back to 1979, I'd say}, I have listened to what many of their peers and contemporaries have said about both men and taken those things, contradictory as they can be at times, into account, most of what I form my opinions with have come from Eric and Ginger's own psyches and mouths. And based over a 45-year period of listening to Ginger himself, he does not come over well to me. It doesn't mean I dislike him or am going to chuck away my Cream albums. But I'll tell you Scott, having read "Hellraiser" and taken in Ginger's own thoughts on his life up until that point, I can't unread all that and pretend he was all sweetness and light. That's gauging him by his own words, not Jack Bruce's ! And I feel pretty much the same about Eric too. I've read two of his autobiographies and he doesn't come over particularly well either.

Another old mate of mine told me that he refuses to read autobiographies because he felt they were self-serving attempts to make the subject in question look good. And I said to him "What's wrong with that ? At least you are getting the perspective of the person and not everyone else." While he had a point, he missed the simple reality that as a person writes about their life we, the readers, have the freedom to form opinions and conclusions based on what we read. And that's what I do. I don't need to meet them. I don't need to meet with people that knew them {although that has its + points too}. The words and perspectives of the person in question is sufficient.

My opinion on Trump is a direct result of him dominating the news cycle and being in public office. It’s the job of the citizens to judge their politicians. He’s dominated the thoughts of people in this county more than any single person in my lifetime. I lose sleep over this demon.

This is completely different than my opinion on Clapton which was changed 100% after hanging out with Ginger. Prior to that I had no opinion about Clapton other than he was one of my biggest early influences with the Bluesbreakers and Cream. After I hung out with Ginger my opinion of him began to change. His public behavior during Covid sealed it.

I loved George Jones until I read his biography after I read it I wanted to punch him in the face, not because of all the things he was notorious for, but for how he treated his band members which was terrible.
 
I've never been into Cream. Dark, uninteresting and boring. Admittedly I've not been exposed to or had any interest in exploring further than their radio stuff. That's just me, and I'm good with that. I'm not fond of Bruce's vocals, don't care for Ginger's garage band style drums. Just my opinion. Now, Clapton....?

I have been impressed with Clapton's professionalism. But seemingly that's all he has, one of the safest big name guitar players I've ever heard. Doesn't seem to take any chances to add color if you will to his lead work, nothing interesting, same same shit, but very professional at it. Maybe it's because of the "Clapton is God" thing, but it's like he is scared, above all else be competent. I have a theory that it is much harder for an older person to learn guitar(probably other instruments as well) than it is for a young person. Young person can take chances, fuck up, it's part of the learning process. An older person has spent a lifetime attempting to be a competent person, avoiding at virtually all cost screwing up, making mistakes. With that, life becomes a little more or much more predictable, maybe less fun & interesting, boring. That's where Clapton lives. In a way you can't fault him but so much, but giving him that break does nothing to add interest to his playing. Very competent but boring.

I may have this wrong, anyone is free to correct me if I am wrong. If I remember it came from Clapton's own mouth. If it's not true I apologize, to him, for judging him wrongly. I'm just going by memory. Grim might know the story better than I. He and his ex lived in the same city, maybe New York? He was either out on the street for a walk or he left his residence upon hearing sirens from emergency vehicles. He walked past the residence where his ex lived with his child. His child has fallen out of a upper window. As he walked by that residence where his ex and child lived, saw the emergency vehicles there, he kept walking. Kept walking on past, I'm pretty sure that's what he said. I can't remember why he kept walking or his explanation for that, but I'm pretty sure that's what he said. Very unusual behavior. It kind of floored me, forever colored my opinion of the man as a person. I could have that wrong, I hope I do.
 
I've never been into Cream. Dark, uninteresting and boring. Admittedly I've not been exposed to or had any interest in exploring further than their radio stuff. That's just me, and I'm good with that. I'm not fond of Bruce's vocals, don't care for Ginger's garage band style drums. Just my opinion. Now, Clapton....?

I have been impressed with Clapton's professionalism. But seemingly that's all he has, one of the safest big name guitar players I've ever heard. Doesn't seem to take any chances to add color if you will to his lead work, nothing interesting, same same shit, but very professional at it. Maybe it's because of the "Clapton is God" thing, but it's like he is scared, above all else be competent. I have a theory that it is much harder for an older person to learn guitar(probably other instruments as well) than it is for a young person. Young person can take chances, fuck up, it's part of the learning process. An older person has spent a lifetime attempting to be a competent person, avoiding at virtually all cost screwing up, making mistakes. With that, life becomes a little more or much more predictable, maybe less fun & interesting, boring. That's where Clapton lives. In a way you can't fault him but so much, but giving him that break does nothing to add interest to his playing. Very competent but boring.

I may have this wrong, anyone is free to correct me if I am wrong. If I remember it came from Clapton's own mouth. If it's not true I apologize, to him, for judging him wrongly. I'm just going by memory. Grim might know the story better than I. He and his ex lived in the same city, maybe New York? He was either out on the street for a walk or he left his residence upon hearing sirens from emergency vehicles. He walked past the residence where his ex lived with his child. His child has fallen out of a upper window. As he walked by that residence where his ex and child lived, saw the emergency vehicles there, he kept walking. Kept walking on past, I'm pretty sure that's what he said. I can't remember why he kept walking or his explanation for that, but I'm pretty sure that's what he said. Very unusual behavior. It kind of floored me, forever colored my opinion of the man as a person. I could have that wrong, I hope I do.
How old are you?

When the cream came out with Sunshine of Your Love and Disraeli Gears they were the cutting edge, original and anything but boring. My entire generation of guitar players were immediately affected by this record. At the time it was my most influential album. Same for Clapton in the Bluesbreakers.

I had a 14 year old daughter and ex wife who were killed in a car accident in 1994 and I had to choose the music for her funeral. At the time Tears From Heaven had just come out and was obviously about EC’s own tragic loss of a child, so I decided to use it in the service. That was one of the biggest mistakes I made because it was on everyone’s playlist and I couldn’t go anywhere without hearing it an$ each time I heard it I got severely depressed and sad. So, if you are ever faced with a similar situation DO NOT use a song in heavy rotation on the radio.
 
I don't really get blues guitar. It's a highly respected medium, so I guess horses for courses. :shrugs:
 
My opinion on Trump is a direct result of him dominating the news cycle and being in public office. It’s the job of the citizens to judge their politicians. He’s dominated the thoughts of people in this county more than any single person in my lifetime. I lose sleep over this demon.

This is completely different than my opinion on Clapton which was changed 100% after hanging out with Ginger. Prior to that I had no opinion about Clapton other than he was one of my biggest early influences with the Bluesbreakers and Cream. After I hung out with Ginger my opinion of him began to change. His public behavior during Covid sealed it.

I loved George Jones until I read his biography after I read it I wanted to punch him in the face, not because of all the things he was notorious for, but for how he treated his band members which was terrible.
Sorry to get off point, but you do realize it was the democrat based media that made Trump dominate the news cycle. It gave them ratings to have him as the scapegoat for their careers. Money and ratings. Who is winning there? Seems that all may be backfiring on them now.

As well as it may be the job of citizens to judge, it used to be the actual journalists that uncovered crimes by politicians. Now it is a coverup crew that only cares about their own survival as supposed journalists from what I see. Its actually scary.

And yes, it also goes both ways on the other side as far as Biden is concerned. I get it. It's all about stature in the news people's careers, not reporting the actual truth.

And back on topic, I also agree that Clapton never really did it for me. But then in the early days of my life I thought Ace Frehley was a great guitar player. I was 8 so... LOL

I envy your time working with so many prolific musicians. Quite impressive man! In my time in bands I really only partied or opened for some great ones. Never really had a chance to play with or bond with them.

Again,. I suppose none of us can form a real judgment of anyone, unless we actually know them. That should resound for your experience as well right?

Seems odd it is different for some than others to you.

I feel I know you a bit more from hearing your recordings. I definitely have respect for your talent. Props man! :)

Just feels like a hateful thing to portray someone with more public persona than you as a 'demon'. Seems more like a personal issue. Just my opinion.

And I apologize for getting off topic here. Just going with the flow.

Cheers brother Bax! Nothing but respect!
 
Sorry to get off point, but you do realize it was the democrat based media that made Trump dominate the news cycle. It gave them ratings to have him as the scapegoat for their careers. Money and ratings. Who is winning there? Seems that all may be backfiring on them now.

As well as it may be the job of citizens to judge, it used to be the actual journalists that uncovered crimes by politicians. Now it is a coverup crew that only cares about their own survival as supposed journalists from what I see. Its actually scary.

And yes, it also goes both ways on the other side as far as Biden is concerned. I get it. It's all about stature in the news people's careers, not reporting the actual truth.

And back on topic, I also agree that Clapton never really did it for me. But then in the early days of my life I thought Ace Frehley was a great guitar player. I was 8 so... LOL

I envy your time working with so many prolific musicians. Quite impressive man! In my time in bands I really only partied or opened for some great ones. Never really had a chance to play with or bond with them.

Again,. I suppose none of us can form a real judgment of anyone, unless we actually know them. That should resound for your experience as well right?

Seems odd it is different for some than others to you.

I feel I know you a bit more from hearing your recordings. I definitely have respect for your talent. Props man! :)

Just feels like a hateful thing to portray someone with more public persona than you as a 'demon'. Seems more like a personal issue. Just my opinion.

And I apologize for getting off topic here. Just going with the flow.

Cheers brother Bax! Nothing but respect!
If you follow the money CNN loved Trump as much as Fox, if not more. Corporate media is in on the con.
 
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How old are you?

When the cream came out with Sunshine of Your Love and Disraeli Gears they were the cutting edge, original and anything but boring. My entire generation of guitar players were immediately affected by this.

Sunshine of Your Love, meh. To each their own. In retrospect I don't really hear anything cutting edge about Cream, or Clapton.

I'm a Zeppelin/Page guy. Blues based, sure, but a more diverse color palette. Coming out of The Yardbirds, Beck, Page, and Clapton, if there was anything cutting edge, innovative, or ground breaking coming out of that it damn sure didn't come from mr professional, competent, and safe Eric Clapton.
 
John Mayer would play circles around Clapton. That's right, I said it.

Sorry Mr Clapton. For the record I listen to Stevie Ray Vaughn for about ten minutes and I'm good for another year, or more. Helluva axe man, but same same all the way through. Pretty much.
 
I never listened to much Cream and yes I am old enough. I also preferred Zep and Beck. The one exception was D&D Layla. Spent a lot of time listening to that. Probably Duane. I loved Eat a Peach as well.
 
My opinion on Trump is a direct result of him dominating the news cycle and being in public office....This is completely different than my opinion on Clapton
Only in the sense that someone else changed your view of Eric. My point is that you don't know, nor have met, either man. Remember, I was responding to your question of whether I'd met Eric or Ginger because I had been none too complementary of either.
which was changed 100% after hanging out with Ginger
Doesn't that make the new viewpoint unfairly slanted ?
I loved George Jones until I read his biography after I read it I wanted to punch him in the face
I hear you !
Back to back last year, I read Miles Davies' autobiography and "All or Nothing" which is an excellent biography of Steve Marriott. Both rank among the most vile people I've ever read about. Excellent music, hideous personas.
I'm not fond of Bruce's vocals, don't care for Ginger's garage band style drums
I can see that. I like Jack Bruce's vocals, I suppose, but not specifically as a vocalist, if that makes any sense. Same with his busy bass playing. There's nothing about the tone I'm particularly enamoured with, there aren't any specific bass lines that I love or look forward to hearing. But for me, Jack Bruce was an integral part of Cream, a major package that they could not have done without. Some people are like that. Take their contribution away and you just don't have that band, yet there's nothing individually outstanding, yet paradoxically, there is, in terms of presence.
Ginger Baker, on the other hand, though he always claimed that rock was an inferior art form and was a jazz drummer with African sensibilities, I always felt was a great drummer with many brilliant elements to him, back in the Cream days. "Sunshine of your Love" wouldn't have been the tour de force it is had he not drummed the way he did on it. It transformed a good song by Jack with a neat addition from Eric, into a magnifico piece of heavy rock that got Hendrix worrying and spurred him on to greater heights. I've long felt that Ringo, Nick Mason and Ginger between them really are the architects of psychedelic, and by extension, progressive rock drumming.
Maybe it's because of the "Clapton is God" thing....
He wasn't responsible for that. He had mixed feelings about it. He quite liked it because it meant he was appreciated for his playing, but he also says he knew it would bring trouble. He also said that at the time there were lots of better players than him.
I have a theory that it is much harder for an older person to learn guitar(probably other instruments as well) than it is for a young person
Possibly....but Clapton was young when he learned how to play the guitar.
I may have this wrong, anyone is free to correct me if I am wrong...His child has fallen out of a upper window. As he walked by that residence where his ex and child lived, saw the emergency vehicles there, he kept walking. Kept walking on past, I'm pretty sure that's what he said. I can't remember why he kept walking or his explanation for that, but I'm pretty sure that's what he said. Very unusual behavior. It kind of floored me, forever colored my opinion of the man as a person
I don't think it was unusual behaviour at all. He'd just been told that his child had fallen out of the window and he admits that initially, he lacked the courage to walk into the building. So he walked on.....but then he did go in. I think it took guts to admit that. If there's one thing I will not judge a person on, it's how they respond to news of the death of someone they love. Detached rationality is rarely the order of the day.
When the cream came out with Sunshine of Your Love and Disraeli Gears they were the cutting edge
And one must also remember that by 1967, rock music was already going in a number of exciting directions via a number of artists, so being cutting-edge was no small thing.
In retrospect I don't really hear anything cutting edge about Cream, or Clapton
In retrospect, perhaps not. But consider this; in 1967, this band was at the vanguard of blues-rock, psychedelic rock, heavy metal rock, progressive rock and jazz-rock. No other artist can lay that claim, not the Beatles, not Zeppelin, not the Jeff Beck Group, not Blood, Sweat & Tears....other than Hendrix and Hendrix's jazz did not come out on records that were released during his lifetime {in the sense of the whole band being jazzers} so people weren't aware of this until stuff like "Nine To the Universe" came out where he jams with some of the pioneers of jazz-fusion like Larry Young and it became known that he was jamming with John Mclaughlin and Larry Coryell and was going to record with Miles Davies.
So I even disagree with you about Cream in retrospect. They are actually one of the most important bands in music history. Their influence on the development of heavy metal, progressive rock and jazz-rock is incalculable.
Blues based, sure, but a more diverse color palette
That was one of the things that set both Led Zeppelin and indeed, much of the music of the 60s apart. By the time Zep came along, artists no longer had to be pigeonholed into one kind of music. Led Zeppelin did have a very diverse palette, yet they, more than any other artist were the ones that blew the heavy metal happening apart and in the immediate, influenced countless bands. Without Zeppelin, Deep Purple wouldn't have gone where they did. They were heavy before Led Zeppelin had made their first album, but when Ritchie Blackmore heard Robert Plant scream, he felt the need to go really heavy and set about looking for a singer who could scream like Plant. And Black Sabbath, who so many commentators love to credit with the "invention of heavy-metal" hadn't even recorded their debut when Zeppelin had 2 riding out there. In fact, when they were recording that groundbreaking first album, their modus operandi was to "out-heavy Led Zeppelin."
Coming out of The Yardbirds, Beck, Page, and Clapton, if there was anything cutting edge, innovative, or ground breaking coming out of that it damn sure didn't come from mr professional, competent, and safe Eric Clapton
Well, that's not what people were saying in 1965. But the reality is that the Yardbirds could see the way music was changing and wanted a slice of the pie too. Clapton at the time didn't want to change from the blues, the rest needed to get out of the blues purist straitjacket. Given the direction Eric took after his stint with John Mayall, I'd say the Yardbirds were right.
 
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