Clapton and others

Clapton shreds…..


I like Clapton on some of his works, especially with Cream and have 461 Ocen Blvd and got to see that (also Marilyn Monroe Kennedy sex house) before big money came and redeveloped that quaint area. I was working for City of Miami Beach, first job out of college circa 2000-2005.

That’s said, I will piss off every guitar purist in here (and consider myself one) by saying I was never a big fan of him up to the hype he commands. And I’ve read his autobiography (fucking killer), own the aforementioned album on vinyl original vintage press, big just never bonded with him style-wise. Jimmy Page and EVH I love both, and both love Clapton, but he’s like the ketchup to my mustard palette. Good but not my preferred flavor.
Besides the lead guitar thing, Keith Richards evolved into one of my favorite (and most e underrated IMO) guitarist in classic rock. Page is just simply one of the best from that era IMO. He ain’t a Spring chicken but still has his wits and apparent health. I will be sad when he passes.

Ps- shook his hand and scared the fuck out of him in an elevator at Hyatt Indianapolis after a Firm show at (then still standing) Market Square Arena ‘86. Doesn’t mean shit to anyone but me but it does a little to me. He is shorter than I am (5’-6”) and was TINY skinny.
 
I like Clapton on some of his works, especially with Cream and have 461 Ocen Blvd and got to see that (also Marilyn Monroe Kennedy sex house) before big money came and redeveloped that quaint area. I was working for City of Miami Beach, first job out of college circa 2000-2005.

That’s said, I will piss off every guitar purist in here (and consider myself one) by saying I was never a big fan of him up to the hype he commands. And I’ve read his autobiography (fucking killer), own the aforementioned album on vinyl original vintage press, big just never bonded with him style-wise. Jimmy Page and EVH I love both, and both love Clapton, but he’s like the ketchup to my mustard palette. Good but not my preferred flavor.
Besides the lead guitar thing, Keith Richards evolved into one of my favorite (and most e underrated IMO) guitarist in classic rock. Page is just simply one of the best from that era IMO. He ain’t a Spring chicken but still has his wits and apparent health. I will be sad when he passes.

Ps- shook his hand and scared the fuck out of him in an elevator at Hyatt Indianapolis after a Firm show at (then still standing) Market Square Arena ‘86. Doesn’t mean shit to anyone but me but it does a little to me. He is shorter than I am (5’-6”) and was TINY skinny.

I played in a band for two years with Kofi Baker, Ginger’s son. We even did some gigs with Malcolm Bruce, Jack’s son, on bass. Were were called B-3 for Baker/Bruce/Bax. During that time I met Ginger on several occasions. I went to his house once and got to jam with him once, where we played Politician, with me on lead and Vox. Ginger and Kofi were both cracra AF, but hilarious too. Ginger told me how Clapton pulled the exact same shit against his bandmates as Robbie Robertson did to the Band where they both stole all the publishing rights for their hit songs for themselves in shady behind their backs dirty dealing. This made both Robertson and Clapton mega millionaires while all the others had to keep struggling for a living. This is well documented in Levon Helm’s documentary regarding how he fucked over the Band.

Both Jack and Ginger desperately wanted the Cream reunion to happen because they needed the money, but Clapton refused for years and years to do the Cream reunion until he finally relented and did it,…..and it’s obvious if you watch that concert video you can see how much Clapton is dreading being onstage with Jack and Ginger. The fact he played a Strat on that gig instead of a SG or 335 was weird too. He never played a Strat in Cream. He didn’t play a Strat until Blind Faith, so I thought the sound was off during that show too.

After the pandemic Clapton’s true colors became apparent and then some old racist clips from the 70’s turned up that made me question his sanity, since he has culturally appropriated nothing but black music,… yet acts like they are vermin if they are immigrants.

I’ve met John Mayer and it makes perfect sense that those two are butt buddies, because of all the amazing artists I’ve met in the business he was the single biggest asshole and douchebag for absolutely no good reason. I can go on for hours with stories about that whanker.

They both think they are a lot better than they really are.

I hung out with EVH once and he was as cool as could be. He was nice and not full of himself and he listened to others when they spoke like a normal human. I recently saw the old clip about Eddie getting to meet his hero Clapton, and Clapton proceeding to be just a big fucking dick to Eddie face.
 
I played in a band for two years with Kofi Baker, Ginger’s son. We even did some gigs with Malcolm Bruce, Jack’s son, on bass. Were were called B-3 for Baker/Bruce/Bax. During that time I met Ginger on several occasions. I went to his house once and got to jam with him once, where we played Politician, with me on lead and Vox. Ginger and Kofi were both cracra AF, but hilarious too. Ginger told me how Clapton pulled the exact same shit against his bandmates as Robbie Robertson did to the Band where they both stole all the publishing rights for their hit songs for themselves in shady behind their backs dirty dealing. This made both Robertson and Clapton mega millionaires while all the others had to keep struggling for a living. This is well documented in Levon Helm’s documentary regarding how he fucked over the Band.

Both Jack and Ginger desperately wanted the Cream reunion to happen because they needed the money, but Clapton refused for years and years to do the Cream reunion until he finally relented and did it,…..and it’s obvious if you watch that concert video you can see how much Clapton is dreading being onstage with Jack and Ginger. The fact he played a Strat on that gig instead of a SG or 335 was weird too. He never played a Strat in Cream. He didn’t play a Strat until Blind Faith, so I thought the sound was off during that show too.

After the pandemic Clapton’s true colors became apparent and then some old racist clips from the 70’s turned up that made me question his sanity, since he has culturally appropriated nothing but black music,… yet acts like they are vermin if they are immigrants.

I’ve met John Mayer and it makes perfect sense that those two are butt buddies, because of all the amazing artists I’ve met in the business he was the single biggest asshole and douchebag for absolutely no good reason. I can go on for hours with stories about that whanker.

They both think they are a lot better than they really are.

I hung out with EVH once and he was as cool as could be. He was nice and not full of himself and he listened to others when they spoke like a normal human. I recently saw the old clip about Eddie getting to meet his hero Clapton, and Clapton proceeding to be just a big fucking dick to Eddie face.
I’ve recently begun to like you in here for other reasons but like you even more with posts like this
 
I’ve recently begun to like you in here for other reasons but like you even more with posts like this
If you haven’t seen Beware of Mr Baker it should be on your must do immediately list. Kofi is in a bunch of clips in that film. In every clip he has chosen to be interviewed with his shirt off….lol. He was obsessed with body building and weight lifting. He constantly ate all these weird supplements and had his metabolism so jacked up he had to eat almost constantly. After every gig we had to get immediately a bunch of Chicken nuggets which he called “Chickly Mc Nuglies” .

We had a two night gig in Breckinridge at Shamus O’Tools on a Fri & Sat. For some reason we had to drive back to Denver in between nights which is a 2.5 hr drive. At the end of the Friday gig Kofi started giving me shit about not working out and making fun of me, so I challenged him to arm wrestle. I thought he would kill me, but I was a determined as fuck to not let him win, even if I had to cheat…lol, So we faced off and we both tried as hard as we could and neither one of us could put the other one down. Kofi and I were both impressed the Kofi couldn’t easily beat me with his muscles. So, flash to the start of Saturday nights gig and Kofi shows up and as we are just about to go on stage he says to me: “Bax, I don’t think I can play the gig. My shoulder hurts from arm wrestling.” I looked dead pan at and said:” I won, then cause look at me, my arm is fine!” . Kofi lost it and had the biggest meltdown and we just laughed our asses off. Kofi couldn’t stand the thought of losing a strength contest with me. It’s still hilarious.

That band was called Funkus Groovus, but by the end I was calling it Funkless Groovless….below is a demo I recorded in a small room in my basement on a 1/2” 8 trk Tascam.

 
If you haven’t seen Beware of Mr Baker it should be on your must do immediately list. Kofi is in a bunch of clips in that film. In every clip he has chosen to be interviewed with his shirt off….lol. He was obsessed with body building and weight lifting. He constantly ate all these weird supplements and had his metabolism so jacked up he had to eat almost constantly. After every gig we had to get immediately a bunch of Chicken nuggets which he called “Chickly Mc Nuglies” .

We had a two night gig in Breckinridge at Shamus O’Tools on a Fri & Sat. For some reason we had to drive back to Denver in between nights which is a 2.5 hr drive. At the end of the Friday gig Kofi started giving me shit about not working out and making fun of me, so I challenged him to arm wrestle. I thought he would kill me, but I was a determined as fuck to not let him win, even if I had to cheat…lol, So we faced off and we both tried as hard as we could and neither one of us could put the other one down. Kofi and I were both impressed the Kofi couldn’t easily beat me with his muscles. So, flash to the start of Saturday nights gig and Kofi shows up and as we are just about to go on stage he says to me: “Bax, I don’t think I can play the gig. My shoulder hurts from arm wrestling.” I looked dead pan at and said:” I won, then cause look at me, my arm is fine!” . Kofi lost it and had the biggest meltdown and we just laughed our asses off. Kofi couldn’t stand the thought of losing a strength contest with me. It’s still hilarious.

That band was called Funkus Groovus, but by the end I was calling it Funkless Groovless….below is a demo I recorded in a small room in my basement on a 1/2” 8 trk Tascam.


You are a good musician and I dig that🤟🤟🤟
 
I like Clapton on some of his works, especially with Cream and have 461 Ocen Blvd and got to see that (also Marilyn Monroe Kennedy sex house) before big money came and redeveloped that quaint area. I was working for City of Miami Beach, first job out of college circa 2000-2005.

That’s said, I will piss off every guitar purist in here (and consider myself one) by saying I was never a big fan of him up to the hype he commands. And I’ve read his autobiography (fucking killer), own the aforementioned album on vinyl original vintage press, big just never bonded with him style-wise. Jimmy Page and EVH I love both, and both love Clapton, but he’s like the ketchup to my mustard palette. Good but not my preferred flavor.
Besides the lead guitar thing, Keith Richards evolved into one of my favorite (and most e underrated IMO) guitarist in classic rock. Page is just simply one of the best from that era IMO. He ain’t a Spring chicken but still has his wits and apparent health. I will be sad when he passes.

Ps- shook his hand and scared the fuck out of him in an elevator at Hyatt Indianapolis after a Firm show at (then still standing) Market Square Arena ‘86. Doesn’t mean shit to anyone but me but it does a little to me. He is shorter than I am (5’-6”) and was TINY skinny.
I will help you. Jack Bruce did all the work and Clapton got all the credit. To me he is a one trick pony that did nothing but go downhill once cream disbanded. I hope that helps.
 
I will piss off every guitar purist in here (and consider myself one) by saying I was never a big fan of him up to the hype he commands
I've never really rated Eric as a guitarist. He's good, but for me, never exceptional. I like his work with Cream, but that's limited to their live stuff.
I had the misfortune to sit through 2 hours of him playing the blues back in 1995. That's 2 hours I'll never get back. And I cycled 11 miles with a dodgy knee to get to the gig and it was freezing. I didn't realize it was going to be him playing the blues or I wouldn't have gone. After the first hour of blues, I was ready to leave but at the break, I thought he'd do something else for the 2nd part of the show.
No such fortune !
I was bored shitless. The crowd absolutely loved him though. After all, it was Eric Clapton. I was muttering and grumbling and thinking what a waste of a Tuesday evening. And the Royal Albert Hall has always had horrible acoustics. The only good thing about that night, apart from when the show ended and I could get out, was that I didn't pay for the ticket.
It's undeniable however, that he was majorly influential back in his day although I don't think he had the long-range influence through time that some of his peers did.
Ginger told me how Clapton pulled the exact same shit against his bandmates as Robbie Robertson did to the Band where they both stole all the publishing rights for their hit songs for themselves in shady behind their backs dirty dealing
Having read his autobiography and listened to/read numerous interviews with Ginger Baker, I would not be inclined to trust a single thing he said about anything. I would even take with a pinch of salt him telling me my name ! If there was ever a person that refused to acknowledge his own arseholiness and justified unfaithfulness and shitty behaviour to the max, it was Ginger Baker.
Good drummer though, and along with Ringo and Nick Mason, a major architect of psychedelic drumming and door opener into the more percussive element of progressive rock drumming.
Both Jack and Ginger desperately wanted the Cream reunion to happen because they needed the money, but Clapton refused for years and years to do the Cream reunion until he finally relented and did it
Clapton didn't need the reunion. And frankly, the way Baker had spent 30 years dissing both Jack and Cream, I think he was a hypocrite.
some old racist clips from the 70’s turned up that made me question his sanity, since he has culturally appropriated nothing but black music,… yet acts like they are vermin if they are immigrants
A reading of Eric's autobiog gives one a really good insight into his mental state over the years. Truth be told, like many of the well-known artists of the last 70 years, he was a train wreck. He did all that pursuing of George Harrison's wife, then treated her like shit and more or less admits that he didn't truly want her once he had her.
On the White album, George's "Savoy Truffle" is a chillingly prophetic song. It catalogues Eric's addictive and excessive being and it's a real eye-opener when one considers that his heroin addiction, alcoholism, excessive suit buying, racist meanderings after trying to parade himself for years as a White Black man {or a Black White man} and other things were yet to come.
I’ve met John Mayer
You know, whenever I hear that name, I never think of the "famous" John Mayer, I always think of the Indian violinist John Mayer who, along with the Jamaican alto saxophonist Joe Harriott, was instrumental in fusing Indian music with jazz back in the 60s. The 3 LPs their double quintet put together in '66, '67 and '68 are revolutionary, completely unsung and beautifully accessible pieces of music that appreciators of music should check out if they have the time and inclination.
For me, there's only ever been one John Mayer.
 
I've never really rated Eric as a guitarist. He's good, but for me, never exceptional. I like his work with Cream, but that's limited to their live stuff.
I had the misfortune to sit through 2 hours of him playing the blues back in 1995. That's 2 hours I'll never get back. And I cycled 11 miles with a dodgy knee to get to the gig and it was freezing. I didn't realize it was going to be him playing the blues or I wouldn't have gone. After the first hour of blues, I was ready to leave but at the break, I thought he'd do something else for the 2nd part of the show.
No such fortune !
I was bored shitless. The crowd absolutely loved him though. After all, it was Eric Clapton. I was muttering and grumbling and thinking what a waste of a Tuesday evening. And the Royal Albert Hall has always had horrible acoustics. The only good thing about that night, apart from when the show ended and I could get out, was that I didn't pay for the ticket.
It's undeniable however, that he was majorly influential back in his day although I don't think he had the long-range influence through time that some of his peers did.

Having read his autobiography and listened to/read numerous interviews with Ginger Baker, I would not be inclined to trust a single thing he said about anything. I would even take with a pinch of salt him telling me my name ! If there was ever a person that refused to acknowledge his own arseholiness and justified unfaithfulness and shitty behaviour to the max, it was Ginger Baker.
Good drummer though, and along with Ringo and Nick Mason, a major architect of psychedelic drumming and door opener into the more percussive element of progressive rock drumming.

Clapton didn't need the reunion. And frankly, the way Baker had spent 30 years dissing both Jack and Cream, I think he was a hypocrite.

A reading of Eric's autobiog gives one a really good insight into his mental state over the years. Truth be told, like many of the well-known artists of the last 70 years, he was a train wreck. He did all that pursuing of George Harrison's wife, then treated her like shit and more or less admits that he didn't truly want her once he had her.
On the White album, George's "Savoy Truffle" is a chillingly prophetic song. It catalogues Eric's addictive and excessive being and it's a real eye-opener when one considers that his heroin addiction, alcoholism, excessive suit buying, racist meanderings after trying to parade himself for years as a White Black man {or a Black White man} and other things were yet to come.

You know, whenever I hear that name, I never think of the "famous" John Mayer, I always think of the Indian violinist John Mayer who, along with the Jamaican alto saxophonist Joe Harriott, was instrumental in fusing Indian music with jazz back in the 60s. The 3 LPs their double quintet put together in '66, '67 and '68 are revolutionary, completely unsung and beautifully accessible pieces of music that appreciators of music should check out if they have the time and inclination.
For me, there's only ever been one John Mayer.
I have another friend who was a professional photographer in the UK in the late 60’s on who confirmed for me what kind of a person Clapton is after several photo shoots with him. I loved hanging out with Ginger. He was engaging, funny and very much together in many ways. Beware of Mr. Baker presents an exaggeration of Ginger. Kofi is in that film too, always shirtless to show of his muscles. I was there with both of them for a couple of years before Ginger left Colorado. Ginger made $230,000 a year off of Cream record royalties while Clapton made millions over the same royalty payment schedule. Clapton has a reputation as large as Ginger’s for being a dick and he is. I sat under the original painting of the cover of Disraeli Gears when I went to his house a couple of times.
 
I will help you. Jack Bruce did all the work and Clapton got all the credit. To me he is a one trick pony that did nothing but go downhill once cream disbanded. I hope that helps.
Clapton could play for sure but I never got the deity status he was given by many. I enjoyed his autobiography immensely and have respect for him kicking his addiction; which with that many years of hard narcotics cannot be an easy thing to do.
 
Clapton could play for sure but I never got the deity status he was given by many. I enjoyed his autobiography immensely, though.
Yes he can play. Yet, he pales in comparison to his two contemporaries who came up out of the Yardbirds. Although I never tried much, I don't think there is much Clapton or Page can do that I can't do, now, Jeff Beck on the other hand.. Then again, I could be lying.
 
Yes he can play. Yet, he pales in comparison to his two contemporaries who came up out of the Yardbirds. Although I never tried much, I don't think there is much Clapton or Page can do that I can't do, now, Jeff Beck on the other hand.. Then again, I could be lying.
Page has some incredible and difficult guitar work as does Beck, not that difficulty has to be the judge of a player (BB King) but it gives one a broader palette to write and create from.
 
Jack Bruce did all the work and Clapton got all the credit.
I think that's a caricature at best. What is often overlooked where Cream are concerned is that they emerged at the very same time as the guitarist becoming the dominant figure in a rock band. First it was the piano and sax that were the dominant aspects of rock and roll music. Then it was the lead singer. The guitar was always there and even important.....but not dominant. Of the three members of Cream, Jack and Ginger probably had the most respect among musicians prior to Cream's coming together. But they weren't revered among the punters in the way Clapton was. His reputation among the fans prior to Cream, because of his time with the Yardbirds and John Mayall was huge. Cream had an audience right from the start primarily due to Eric, combined with the fact that guitarists were starting to emerge as a focal point to rival and overthrow the singer. It caused quite a few singers like Keith Relf much consternation ! And let's face it, even now, if a 3-piece is playing, no matter how good the bassist and drummer are, before they're noticed, most eyes and ears will initially gravitate to the guitarist, even if they're shit.
To me he is a one trick pony that did nothing but go downhill once cream disbanded
I agree with that to a limited degree. I think much of his post-Cream stuff is bland. It's almost as though he couldn't decide whether he wanted to expand or just play safe with the blues. Periodically, his one-trick-ponyism did yield some useful results though.
 
Clapton could play for sure but I never got the deity status he was given by many. I enjoyed his autobiography immensely and have respect for him kicking his addiction; which with that many years of hard narcotics cannot be an easy thing to do.
The so-called deity status came about over a specific photo that went viral in (I think) Creem music magazine in 1967 or so. There was wall in the UK where someone spray painted graffiti that said “Clapton Is God”. It made a big splash when it was published and at the Clapton was embarrassed by it, but later I think it went to his head. Apparently, he has always been a douche. He and Mayer make good bedfellows.
 
I didn't buy into the "Clapton is God" stuff. While Bluesbreaker was good, I didn't find it the ultimate sound or style. For me, Jimi was much more my guitar hero. He's still my all time favorite guitarist. Unfortunately, that died early. And I don't judge an artist's work by his personal habits/politics/attitudes. There are lots of artists that have views that I don't agree with, and others that I've heard are complete assh*les, but their music is great. Maybe I just separate the music from the person.

A good bit of Clapton's early solo work was extremely muted to me. It's like he tried to adopt some of The Band's sound, somewhat relaxed, minimalistic, and a step away from the long winded improv/jam style of Cream. HIs take on JJ Cale stuff is a case in point. I think a lot of it was also due to his drug addled state, which was so common in that period. EVERYBODY seems like they were flying high on drugs.

On the other hand, I like some of his much later works, like Reptile. I don't think it was a commercial success among his fans, but he gave it a try. Everyone wants to hear the Les Paul/ES-335/Marshall/Sunshine days. Fine, pull out your Disraeli Gears album and enjoy. I still enjoy listening to other parts of his career. And for someone who has been doing music for well over 50 years, he is entitled to evolve and try new stuff.
 
It's like he tried to adopt some of The Band's sound, somewhat relaxed, minimalistic, and a step away from the long winded improv/jam style of Cream
That's exactly what he was doing at the time. He found the Band's united, giving style in 1968 a world away from the intensity and ego of Cream. And let's face it, Ginger Baker's ego could be seen from space without a satellite ! And Jack Bruce wasn't exactly humble and modest back then because he knew he was pioneering something on the bass. Indeed, the very reason the band was called Cream was because they believed that's what they were, the cream of the talent on their respective instruments.
But Eric discovered that he wasn't up for improvising for 2 hours like Jack and Ginger were. So even Blind Faith turned out to be not what he wanted.
 
I grew up listening to Clapton and the rest of the 70s icons. Zepp, Petty, Eagles, Doobie Bros; they were our lexicon. Finally, in the mid-90s, I saw Clapton in Austin. He was doing a "Night of the Blues" tour. It was basically an all-acoustic show. I guess it was shortly after is MTV Unplugged session. The first two songs were lesser known, but he played them through amps as you would expect a rock band to do. But the he went acoustic. Pulled chairs into a semi-circle center stage.... and played songs no one ever heard before. Slow boring blues songs. The same little riffs, over and over, song after song. My girlfriend fell asleep.

In between songs.... dead silence in an arena filled with 5000 people. It was incredible, as in, an incredibly boring show. The highlight was when during a long awkward quiet between songs, someone shouted, "Play something we know..." and the whole arena erupted in laughter.
 
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