Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4
Results 31 to 39 of 39

Thread: What about DIY pedals? Any "trusted" resources for kits?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,280
    Thanks
    655
    Thanked 295 Times in 280 Posts
    Rep Power
    2288196
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Quote Originally Posted by pikingrin View Post
    Sorry for the late response, Nola, I haven't checked this thread in a while. Long story short, I've built 7 pedals (and modded a Boss SD-1) since I started this thread, and they all do what they're supposed to do. I've been sticking with vintage pedal clones so I really don't have any basis of comparison versus the originals other than youtube videos - not really a great A/B source. I have been very pleased with all of them, especially the Rat clone and the Octavia clone I just finished - that Octavia is badass and the Rat, although a slightly different type of effect than the Octavia, is also awesome.

    But I will say that, for my purposes, they have been far less expensive than the actual pedals - I just got a DIY klon centaur kit for $58.50, starting that one later this week, and the original can be found for around 10x that if you're lucky. I generally don't do any that you can go to your local shop and pick up new in the box but I would imagine that the kits may be less expensive depending on the pedal you're doing.

    I would say, if you're half decent with a soldering iron, give it a shot. Start out looking through the kits at BYOC as I feel they have a slightly better set of instructions for their kits, especially if it's your first build, and read through the descriptions. They have a few kits that would be good for a first-time build that sound great; I started with BYOC's 250+ kit, using the parts for the MXR circuit, and it wasn't disappointing. Now I'm an addict.

    thanks, do you think building a Rat from BYOC would be an okay place to start? They have two Rat a normal and little which did you build?

    I only have the tip that came with my solder, it's like a medium side...do you think i'd have to get a small tip, too, or is that size tip okay on the little boards if i get in and out fast?

    also, have you painted them or labeled them?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3,658
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 274 Times in 252 Posts
    Rep Power
    7968219
    Damnit Pikingrin. You were supposed to say that the kits were awful, and they were a giant fiasco, and they sound like crap. Now I'm gonna have to buy a bunch of them. And an Octavia? Insult to injury, man.

    Seriously though, I'm glad to hear that the pedals have been a success. Now a DIY kit has moved up on my already too long wish list.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Age
    37
    Posts
    1,474
    Thanks
    133
    Thanked 48 Times in 45 Posts
    Rep Power
    1552530
    Quote Originally Posted by Nola View Post
    thanks, do you think building a Rat from BYOC would be an okay place to start? They have two Rat a normal and little which did you build?

    I only have the tip that came with my solder, it's like a medium side...do you think i'd have to get a small tip, too, or is that size tip okay on the little boards if i get in and out fast?

    also, have you painted them or labeled them?
    I built the normal version; I have built two of their mini pedals and I think that's all I care to do. IMO it's much easier to fit everything in the normal size enclosure than in a mini - you have to be very careful on the mini kits to keep your wires from the jacks to the PCB short enough so that they don't pinch and don't keep the PCB from sitting low enough to put the back plate on the pedal. Kind of a challenge with the minis that you don't have to worry about with any of the normal sized enclosures. I am pretty sure I got the 125b sized enclosure, it's similar to the size of an MXR box and there's plenty of room.

    Hopefully your soldering iron is no more than 25 watts, that's all you'll need. I use a pencil tip with a point at the end of it, some use a chisel tip from what I've seen. The small pencil tip that I use lets you get in and make good contact with the soldering pads without any collateral damage to the surrounding board. You could give your tip a try and see how it goes, no harm in that. Also, not sure what size solder you have, but I would recommend ordering some Kester 1mm (0.30") rosin core 60/40 off of amazon (or your local hardware store if they have it). The kits come with solder, and it works, but it's just not as high quality as the Kester stuff and the joints just don't have the shine like they should. Pretty sure I'll have to resolder the pedal that I used the kit solder on at some point in time.

    I have painted all of mine and it's been a trial and error process to figure out what works. I haven't tried the printed labels though. I checked out this video on YouTube after I screwed up my first pedal. This guy uses the labels but his prep methods work well. Sand the enclosure, wipe down with Naptha (gasses off quickly), and apply a few thin coats of clean metal primer. Spray with your color of choice, again just a few thin coats to cover the primer, and then a few coats of gloss clear coat after that just for added protection. I have used a paint marker on some to put the name and control labels on - if you go that route, put the markings on before you apply the clear coat. If you don't care and just want to use a sharpie, which is what I've done on the last few, make sure you put the clear coat on and let it dry before you mark with the sharpie. If you use the marker before clear coating, it bleeds out a little and doesn't look very good.
    Intel i5 3.1ghz, Win7 Home Premium 64 bit, 16gb RAM, focusrite saffire pro40, Cubase 7.5, lazy pit bull (gets it from her mother).

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Age
    37
    Posts
    1,474
    Thanks
    133
    Thanked 48 Times in 45 Posts
    Rep Power
    1552530
    Quote Originally Posted by Tadpui View Post
    Damnit Pikingrin. You were supposed to say that the kits were awful, and they were a giant fiasco, and they sound like crap. Now I'm gonna have to buy a bunch of them. And an Octavia? Insult to injury, man.

    Seriously though, I'm glad to hear that the pedals have been a success. Now a DIY kit has moved up on my already too long wish list.
    Sorry about that, Tadpui!

    If it makes you feel any better, I did have an issue with one of the builds... But, that was builder error, before I knew what everything was, and it was easy enough (and good practice) to fix. Like I said, I'm an addict now - my wishlists on GGG and BYOC haven't even begun to dwindle down...
    Intel i5 3.1ghz, Win7 Home Premium 64 bit, 16gb RAM, focusrite saffire pro40, Cubase 7.5, lazy pit bull (gets it from her mother).

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Brasil
    Posts
    632
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Rep Power
    932698
    I didn't read all the thread so sorry if I missed something. A couple years ago I was into this DIY pedals and started to collect projects, parts lists, sites, etc. I ended finding the forum and the parts mentioned by Ash and as I was super-excited with the idea of make my own stomp boxes I ordered the parts and the board to assemble a compressor.

    The very first issue that you may be prepared to face is that mostly of the time you WON'T find the proper parts for your projects. Buy electronic parts is not as to go shopping with a supermarket list. Mostly of available projects will list a few parts that are discontinued, obsolete or simply hard to find. Sure, you have the 'equivalent lists' that supposed to point you alternative parts that you can put in place, but some of those parts (specially ICs and transistors) aren't just direct replace ones and they require adaptations, changes in the pinning and other tricky things.

    Second there is the PCB board problem. One will want to make their own board and deal with its design, the acid bath, etc. I wouldn't advice to do that. For the novice it's better to go after the ready to use PCBs. There are some online stores that already sell the PCBs for the pedals you want to assemble.

    In my case, I had a huge list of pedals I had the intention to assemble. Long history short, I never finished the first project (a compressor). My main obstacle is that I am not good with soldering iron (or my iron is crap) and I started to frustrate myself struggling with soldering simple parts as capacitors and resistors, so I didn't wan to move forward and try to solder transistors and ICs to not risk to burn them. Then the project remained where it is and I never came back to it again. To tell you the truth I am not willing to and it just remembered me that I have to find the stuff and give it away for someone else...



    What I mean is that this is the kind of project only for those that has previous intimacy with electronics. Beside the soldering part (that seems to be quite easy, but believe me it is not that simple to make a good soldering!) hardly a kit or project will work straightly after the assembling. I already had such experience several years ago assembling electronics magazine kits and mostly of the ones I made never worked or worked with issues that I couldn't solve. An experienced electronic technician can quickly spot (and fix) a problem by the symptoms like hums, buzzes, burn smell, etc, but for a simple curious person it's practically impossible and you will just keep staring to that thing.

    The problem with electronic kit assemblers is that we normally don't know jack about electronics and that thing is just a board with a bunch of mysterious parts attached to it. At least that's how it is for me. I have not any idea how that stuff works!

    This way I think that pedal projects are for the electronics enthusiast that has plenty of experience or for those that wants to dive into this and LEARN. Now if you are only a guitarist that is after to get cheap clones of boutique pedals or impress your friends with your fancy homemade boxes, know that:

    1) Kits aren't as cheap as they seem
    2) This is a hard way to go

    If you didn't get scared with my words just never mind and rock on!


  6. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,280
    Thanks
    655
    Thanked 295 Times in 280 Posts
    Rep Power
    2288196
    can you guys recommend a brand and model of primer and lacquer? i read you have to use gloss and i can't find any gloss stuff that's cheap at all they're all like $30 for a can.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Age
    37
    Posts
    1,474
    Thanks
    133
    Thanked 48 Times in 45 Posts
    Rep Power
    1552530
    If you're going to use these for finishing the aluminum enclosure, just go to Ace hardware (or Walmart) and grab some clean metal primer and a can of gloss clear coat - Rustoleum makes both and they're around $5.00 per can. If you have an Ace hardware, their store brand works just as well and it's about $3.50 per can here.

    Just make sure that you sand down the enclosure and wipe clean with Naptha before you start spraying. Don't overdo it on any of your coats and you'll be fine. You can do a fine sand and re-wipe with Natpha between coats if you want, too, just to make sure there is a rough surface for the paint to adhere to.
    Intel i5 3.1ghz, Win7 Home Premium 64 bit, 16gb RAM, focusrite saffire pro40, Cubase 7.5, lazy pit bull (gets it from her mother).

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,280
    Thanks
    655
    Thanked 295 Times in 280 Posts
    Rep Power
    2288196
    Quote Originally Posted by pikingrin View Post
    If you're going to use these for finishing the aluminum enclosure, just go to Ace hardware (or Walmart) and grab some clean metal primer and a can of gloss clear coat - Rustoleum makes both and they're around $5.00 per can. If you have an Ace hardware, their store brand works just as well and it's about $3.50 per can here.

    Just make sure that you sand down the enclosure and wipe clean with Naptha before you start spraying. Don't overdo it on any of your coats and you'll be fine. You can do a fine sand and re-wipe with Natpha between coats if you want, too, just to make sure there is a rough surface for the paint to adhere to.
    thanks for those leads piningrin. did you use the gloss primer? i read online people saying to only use the gloss not the flat for the primer, and i can't find the gloss that cheap anywhere online, but i can check out local stores. did you use a brush to get the primer on or an aerosol can?

    also, what grit of sandpaper do you think i should use?

    oh one more question: can these pedals all be connected to one another safely? do any of them have issues?
    Last edited by Nola; 02-15-2016 at 22:18.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Age
    37
    Posts
    1,474
    Thanks
    133
    Thanked 48 Times in 45 Posts
    Rep Power
    1552530
    No, I just use Ace hardware brand flat white clean metal primer in an aerosol can. Once the color goes on, I use a clear gloss topcoat in a spray can as well. I'd imagine that the lacquer that you had asked about in an earlier post may be recommended if you're using water transfer decals - it builds quicker and provides more of a hard finish I think. However, having relentlessly stomped on my original builds, the spray can stuff works just fine.

    I sand with 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper, the black stuff, to prep my enclosures. I'd say, as long as it's not anything lower than 120 grit or so you'd be fine. The really coarse grits scratch the enclosure up pretty good.

    Every pedal that I have built goes on a 1-spot in a chain with any other off-the-shelf pedals. Typically, they will say in the description of the kit whether or not they will have to be on their own PS. Most kits, though, have a negative ground circuit and are able to be daisy chained on a PS with other 9v pedals you may have. If anything, they all come with a 9v battery terminal that you can wire in if you don't want to worry about all of that. Do some googling into positive ground and negative ground pedals to get a little more detailed info.
    Intel i5 3.1ghz, Win7 Home Premium 64 bit, 16gb RAM, focusrite saffire pro40, Cubase 7.5, lazy pit bull (gets it from her mother).

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to pikingrin For This Useful Post:


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-01-2008, 04:51
  2. Premier "Artist" kits
    By charger in forum Drums and Percussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-16-2002, 10:27

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •