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Thread: IV Chord

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    I dont know if an of you are aware, but, can't the IV chord sound good either major or minor in most major progessions? I find that it does goo too resolve the IV to minor after having played it major for a few barss..here is an exmaple progression..
    C-Am-G-F-Fm

    are any of you familiar with this technique?

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    Moody Blues use the same major minor chord changes alot?

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    Yeah, I think that is likely a blues standard. i've heard it used in a lot of songs from the 50's-60's.
    I've actually used that exact progression on 2 different songs to different affect, one is kind of deliberate nod to the classic feel of it. the other i tried to modernize it a bit. They both suck.

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    Following the classic rules, the IV Chord in a major progression should be major. But indeed, often the IV can also be used IVmi, which is derived from the 'MOLDUR' scale (that's the dutch word, sorry if the english is somewhat different:-)) Molldur has all the charicaristics from a major scale but has a lowered sixth. So you can easily play between IV and IVmi, even between IImi and IImi(b5)

    greetings!

    Brett

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    In your example the C and Am often go together well because A is the relative minor of C. You could also think of Am as a C6 chord without the fifth. In that case, the F and G are part of the "normal" I IV V progression.

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    A jazz minor scale plays very nicely against that IVm chord.

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