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    Interesting articles

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    I was scouring through a bunch of saved news articles in my phone and found this one from August 2017. I'm sure you're all familiar with the subject matter.

    "The click": Drummer Greg Ellis says this music production tool is the reason why all new music sounds the same Quartz

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    Last edited by spantini; 02-21-2018 at 20:08.
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    Quote Originally Posted by spantini View Post
    I was scouring through a bunch of saved news articles in my phone and found this one from August 2017. I'm sure you're all familiar with the subject matter.

    "The click": Drummer Greg Ellis says this music production tool is the reason why all new music sounds the same — Quartz

    Had not read that before...but yeah, it's basically about how technology is ruining music production and turning it into an assembly line process, parts-is-parts...and all that.

    I don't know why he kinda starts off by blaming "the click"...since click tracks have been used in the studio looooong before there was any digital technology in the studio....but, it was used a bit differently, and everyone just played with it, not to it, and they played through the whole thing, usually as a group, though punch-ins were also used long before digital...but only when really needed, because punching in with tape had to be a well orchestrated maneuver.

    The bits-n-pieces approach to much of digital audio production has definitely become a craze and a norm for many...from the home hobbyist to the pros. The desire to make every measure, every note perfect...has caused this type of production approach, though sometimes it's also used to make the process "easier" for the "artists" who have a hard time doing entire songs non-stop without too much trouble.

    Also...people use this approach as a compositional tool in many cases. There's often no completed song or worked out pre-production...rather a small idea is recorded...even a few measures...and then bits-n-pieces are added, sometimes over long periods of time, and multiple sessions...so it's more of an assembly of small parts, that eventually becomes a bunch of tracks...and then finally the song is realized simultaneously will the production takes place. Not to mention...there's always a bunch of alternate versions of every bit-n-piece, so that the final selection of parts isn't made until the actual mixing process...and even then, there may be multiple alternate mixes...etc.

    So when everyone works in that manner...there will be a certain feel, sometimes even sound, that is common from one song to another, even when they are from different artists done in different studios. It's the feel and sound of digital audio production.
    Of course, there are still many who don't use digital recording in that manner, and who follow the more traditional process of song writing and pre-production and recording and mixing.

    Much of it can be avoided if people focused more on the song writing and arranging away from their computers...and then also spending a good deal of time on pre-production, practicing and planning the recording of individual tracks and the sound they are after...etc...but too many simply find that process "unproductive" and/or that it requires too much decision making up front, and of course, commitment...and they're thinking that by doing the bits-n-pieces approach, it's more creative and liberating...but that's something for everyone to decide for themselves.

    I'm glad for many reasons that I still cling to my multi-track tape deck and do most of my recording to it before dumping the tracks to digital...but not getting caught up in that bits-n-pieces style of production is certainly a key reason. With the tape recording, you're kind forced to do some pre-production planning, and most tracks are done start to finish, with very rare "punch-ins".
    Oh...I'll still track the drums to a click track...but once they are recorded, the rest of the tracks follow the drums, and the click is turned off usually.
    That way there is a more free feel...though honestly, a click doesn't force anyone to play everything perfectly, on the beat, all the time. You can play in and around a click, same as you can with a drummer or other players. It's only because a lot of people think perfect time is perfect for everything that they quantize and kill all the life out of their rhythm.
    Last edited by miroslav; 01-14-2018 at 19:19.

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    Metronome - Wikipedia

    Invented in 1815 and has had its lovers and haters ever since!

    Dave.

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    I love to fire up the click track then ignore it I think that another homogenization issue is the copy cat mentality. Which has always been a part of the music industry since it became big business. But I hear a cool guitar tone and suddenly the exact same tone is on 20 different releases, like they all used the same $&^*()^#$ plug in preset. I admit to seeing if I can match a particular tone using just a mic and an amp, with maybe a pedal , but I also find myself tweaking to something else once I've figured a way to reproduce it.
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    So Ellis is a session drummer. I wonder how different he sounded on different recordings? I bet if you studied his sound, his drumming would be noticed regardless of who he was recording with. The only difference from then is, they used different session musicians.
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    When I go out to see bands I prefer a human drummer over watching a drum-machine play. The thing is the human drummers move and make faces like the guitarists do, where the drum machines just sit there.

    if it's not happening in the room, it ain't gonna happen on tape.-H.Gerst

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    I don't know, those EDM guys make some funny faces when they push those buttons, doing their glitches and stuff.
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    I have mixed feelings about this article. The first is that I do agree that recording to a metronome can limit your freedom. Sometimes when I'm recording, I sometimes turn off the metronome if I want the song to have a more "live" feel to it. Secondly, I don't think the metronome is a bad tool on every song. Not every song we create needs to be open to whatever the recording artist wants to play on that day. Occasionally, we need a more processed sound for some songs.
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    Another Interesting Article

    I was looking for info on adding an external mixer for monitoring purposes when I got caught up in the homerecording.com's wayback machine and found this most excellent article:

    How to connect a mixer to a computer-based recording setup

    Using a Mixer With a DAW

    Here's the original wayback thread : Recording with mixer...
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    I have about 5 years worth of Home Recording magazine back issues that are regular reread for tips. That and Recording Magazine back issues are great go-to's if you are looking for inspiration or advice and a lot of the old articles are available online :Recording Magazine The Magazine For the Recording Musician and of course the ever popular Sound On Sound | The World's Premier Music Recording Technology Magazine I haven't located any of the Home Recording Mag stuff online yet. I actually got on this forum after a search for "Home recording Magazine"
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