Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: How Important Is a Studio Album?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    167
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Rep Power
    119246

    How Important Is a Studio Album?

    Sign in to disable this ad
    In this day and age, is the studio album what it once was?

    My band has been together for 8 years. We have over 40 fairly-awesome, original tunes. We have our own "recording studio", nothing fancy but definitely effective. We play out, but due to our schedules, etc. we don't play out often, maybe 2-3 times a year at small venues.
    As a band, we're substantial, but our resume is weak.

    Personally, I feel like only the lucky few get to make an album. Making an album immortalizes you.
    The other 3 guys don't want to put in the time to make an awesome album. They'd rather focus our attention on developing new tunes, etc.

    We were on the verge. We started out to record 24 tunes and make 2 studio albums. But they bailed. The project was "too daunting". I'm devastated. I wanted an album.

    Am I being too emotional? Are they being too shortsighted? Does an album matter as much as I feel like it does? Is this the age of the "single"? Should I lighten up?
    What are your thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    14,842
    Thanks
    89
    Thanked 683 Times in 624 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474865
    If you're a band playing originals, you need something to sell at your gigs. You want your audience leaving the venue with your songs still on their mind. A CD, download site, USB drive, etc, will keep your music going after the show is over. I do not know what the norm is but I say at least 5 songs.

    As for full length albums, they are fun to do and something to be proud of, but few listeners are buying full length albums. Streaming and downloads are where it's at.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    167
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Rep Power
    119246
    That helped, Chili, thank you.
    I'm getting more comfortable with the idea of releasing singles for download, but I'm confused as to how you finish the product. An album has cover art, liner notes, packaging, etc. How do you package a single? Is cover art a thing anymore? Where do you put credits and lyrics?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Lowell Street Studio, New England
    Posts
    12,671
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 643 Times in 611 Posts
    Rep Power
    18632361
    I agree with Chili, HOWEVER ... if you guys are only playing out 2-3 times a year ... well, maybe its time to start a side project and record your own stuff.
    Mike B My new album on CD Baby: Fact and Fiction
    My Bandcamp site: http://mikebirchmusic.bandcamp.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    19,963
    Thanks
    482
    Thanked 1,026 Times in 890 Posts
    Rep Power
    21464867
    I get the whole streaming singles thing...and that should certainly one option for fans...
    ...but there's no reason not to also churn out a studio album.

    Sure, if you are going to make a CD, it's going to cost some, especially if you go for the full-tilt CD case with sleeves, etc, and you would usually get like the 1000 CD pressed & printed for the best pricing...though you can also opt for the "on-the-cheap, and use those "make-your-own" online options where you can get as few or as many, but it's just a typical CD burner copy and the printing is not like a commercial quality job.

    While I do agree that everyone is into the single download thing...if you have a decent fan base, they might very well like the option of buying as physical CD at your gigs. You can still sell singles and even the full album in electronic format too, online.

    I think for a home rec musician, the physical CD route is dead...but if you are regularly performing, there's still something about the physical CD appeal...something your fans get to take away from a gig, rather then be given a link to a website to download.
    AFAIK...most cars still have CD players...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    paradise
    Posts
    4,690
    Thanks
    144
    Thanked 641 Times in 564 Posts
    Rep Power
    8664315
    So what if streaming and downloads are the current state of affairs.....

    An album is an accomplishment akin to a writer having an actual book. Everyone can be a 'blogger', thats writing.
    But you publish a book, that ends up in a coffee table, bedside table, etc, that makes you legit.

    Same thing with music


    There's just something rewarding about something physical that has your name on it.

    I'd say go for it. Even better, do vinyl also.

    One question however.(or a couple) You only gig 2 or 3 times a year because of time? How often do you rehearse? How can you be a good solid band if you're not constantly doing your craft??
    Last edited by RFR; 03-16-2018 at 02:10.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6,893
    Thanks
    356
    Thanked 520 Times in 481 Posts
    Rep Power
    13622049
    I agree with everyone that is is a "singles" market. But me, I have to do albums, I like the whole concept of a set of ideas/music wrapped into a package. Guess I am just too old school, but I think many artists think that way.

    Even if you only get one play from the release, they could come back for more.
    DM60 Tunes: The Collection

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ranelagh Tasmania
    Age
    69
    Posts
    8,744
    Thanks
    248
    Thanked 806 Times in 671 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474860
    Whether a CD is important or not depends on the perspective of the musicians. Personally, I think it is important; it is something that you can hold in your hand and say "I did this". It is something to be proud of, and a record of achievement.

    However, I do know of people who are simply not interested in recording. They enjoying playing, they are good at their craft, but the idea of recording their material barely skims their consciousness.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    89
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
    Rep Power
    310404
    I agree with the others in saying that having both options, a physical CD as well as online streaming, is important to appease both sides of the spectrum. We are no longer in the era where vinyls and CDs were the only way to play your music, so a band today must adapt online if they want to survive. Still, having something physical can win over a few more fans.
    Alec Weesner | Video-Game Composer
    www.alecweesner.com | alec.weesner@gmail.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Texas USA
    Posts
    2,605
    Thanks
    222
    Thanked 480 Times in 443 Posts
    Rep Power
    2316392
    Most of the folks I know doing CDs, or at least as common, EPs, have two concrete reasons, and they are to have some "merch" to sell at gigs, and to open some doors at venues that may have that as a kind of "check-box" on the list of things they want the acts they book to have. The latter is getting a little fuzzier with more and more folks accepting streaming as the main form for music distribution, but, still, the folks running the clubs may have some dated views, and it's their venue. (If you don't have a physical CD, a presence on iTunes, Spotify, et al, is still a good thing.)

    Of course, there's often some internal motivation that doesn't have any consequence other than "it feels good" I suppose, but I probably wouldn't make that a driver if you're trying to get other folks on board since they don't seem to share that view so much.

    Since you don't have a lot of gigs, having "merch" is probably not going to make a big impact, or possibly even pay for the cost of recording, so I'd really consider a lower bar, like a 6-10 song EP or single CD, depending on the length of your material, or, just streaming/download options of "finished" songs.

    And, realistically, I think a half dozen songs is plenty, and then do another in a year, but consider getting some studio or live videos for promotion to get more gigs. Whether you/any of us like it or not, "social media engagement" is all about having video, or at least where it starts these days. (I don't think you can get most folks to listen to your music if you don't have a video first. And keep that video short, BTW.)
    "... I know in the mornin' that it's gonna be good
    when I stick out my elbows and they don't bump wood." - Bill Kirchen

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Important album ... time for a new Mac?
    By endserenading81 in forum Digital Recording & Computers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-08-2011, 13:34
  2. Most Important Studio Asset!
    By Killbrillearwax in forum Mixing Techniques
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 11-06-2008, 15:30
  3. How important are microphone preamps to a home studio?
    By BIGTYME in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 131
    Last Post: 10-19-2007, 07:53
  4. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 10-28-2004, 14:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •