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Thread: New studio space...considering my options.

  1. #71
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    "Wooden" beams Miroslav?

    Dave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ecc83 View Post
    "Wooden" beams Miroslav?

    Dave.
    The primary definition of the adjective “wooden” is made of wood.
    The secondary definition of “wood” as an adjective is wooden.
    In other words, “wood” as an adjective is interchangeable with “wooden”, despite the fact that “wooden” looks more like an adjective than does “wood” (which also is a noun).



  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    Why no basements in Texas...? Is that most of Texas or just where the land is below sea level...?

    On my street, to the best of my knowledge, no one has a basement. It's what they built here...not sure why.
    Otherwise yes, a lot of house have them...but TBH, only some are really useable with the older houses. The new construction, it seems many are finished like another floor, all living space...so there's not much storage anyway.
    We have sheds for storage.
    South Texas has not only sea level against but also is covered in a mixture of sand, clay and detritus that expands and contracts so much that it cracks basement/cellar walls fairly easily without heavy reinforcement. The water table is very close to the surface in many areas. Much of Texas is former sea bottom/marsh land. The so called "gumbo" mud that forms much of ground is very difficult to dig. Large buildings have underground garages and maintenance areas, including the Harris County courts system. They all flood.

    In the Dallas area they have tornado shelters which are essentially basements and they are expensive.

    In hillier areas they could be building with cellars/split levels , but they mostly don't. I suspect that in Europe and other US states population density tends to help determine whether or not homes are built with an up/down footprint rather than spread out. In Texas there is plenty of space, thus less need to go vertical.


    I grew up in the Seattle area(hills and valleys) and most houses were split level/unfinished basement much like yours . The upper level had the ranch look and all the main living areas and the basement usually had a "rec room" to the rear with windows and a sliding glass door to the backyard, a minimal bathroom , the heater, water heater etc. and some unfinished space that could be built out. We lived on Mercer Island when I was a boy and that was and old house right on the water. It had a services cellar just like most places, but not an actual basement.

    My brother lives in the area north of Atlanta in an equally hilly area and his house has the split level also, though it is three levels- two at street level, backyard below the grade of the front.

    Conclusion:water table, real estate prices, construction cost all are against building houses with basements in most of (mostly flat) Texas.
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    Is th because there's always some "preferred" dimension when it comes to wood beams and all that stuff. Not saying you can't do oddball dimensions...but the builders always like things in more specific, common lengths/widths...it tends to be easier and less costly than some oddball measurements where you need to special order a beam or what have you.
    Yes, 8 ft (96") or 12 ft (144") multiples are preferred due to the standard lengths of 2x___s. Anything different means wasting wood and more cutting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gtoboy View Post
    South Texas has not only sea level against but also is covered in a mixture of sand, clay and detritus that expands and contracts so much that it cracks basement/cellar walls fairly easily without heavy reinforcement.
    I would think though that even without the basements, they still need to have a slab/foundation that is able to withstand that, so I would think they could also engineer basements too...but it's probably not worth the extra $$$.


    Quote Originally Posted by mjbphotos View Post
    Yes, 8 ft (96") or 12 ft (144") multiples are preferred due to the standard lengths of 2x___s. Anything different means wasting wood and more cutting.
    Yeah...I know. It's good in that it makes some things easier...when layout out a plan or knowing how much material you need...etc...but it's also one reason so many house all look the same, because builders work off of templates that use those preferred dimensions.
    In the last month or two when I was house window shopping...boy, I saw MANY ugly, boring houses that were all nice and new and inside shiny and everything...but just really boring/ugly, and usually one of many similar homes in any type of development.
    I usually just skipped over those because I knew the inside pictures of the rooms would be almost all the same...with no imagination or personality.

    I prefer house that are somewhat unusual...that don't follow the easiest, straightest lines.

    Funny, when I was talking to a contractor I know that's done some work for me (but he didn't want to get into this project), and we were talking about siding, and the fact that I didn't want my house completely wrapped in vinyl siding, and instead I wanted something different or maybe a couple combinations...plus, we both commented that with all the angles and corners my house has, it would get pricey.
    To that I commented that I bet all the contractors preferred working on shoebox houses, and he laughed and said yeah, because it was just so much easier, you go do it with your eyes closed and you don't have to measure endlessly and all that...it's all straight lines and standard measurements.

    That said...when you get up into the high hundred thousands and over 1ML...you see more imagination in house construction...just like you see a lot of basements with 10' ceilings.

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    The primary definition of the adjective “wooden” is made of wood.
    The secondary definition of “wood” as an adjective is wooden.
    In other words, “wood” as an adjective is interchangeable with “wooden”, despite the fact that “wooden” looks more like an adjective than does “wood” (which also is a noun).


    Good, golly gosh Miroslav! I was NOT questioning your grammer! I am not worthy. No, it was the FACT of wood that surprised me. I see quite few house makeover programmes on TV and here, where a supporting wall is removed or modified a steel girder ( "i" beam I think you call them? We say "RSJ").

    Wood burns you see. Yes, steel will soften and bend in a hot enough fire of course and for certain critical applications they are sprayed with a fire stop coating.

    As you were.

    Dave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ecc83 View Post
    Good, golly gosh Miroslav! I was NOT questioning your grammer! I am not worthy. No, it was the FACT of wood that surprised me. I see quite few house makeover programmes on TV and here, where a supporting wall is removed or modified a steel girder ( "i" beam I think you call them? We say "RSJ").

    Wood burns you see. Yes, steel will soften and bend in a hot enough fire of course and for certain critical applications they are sprayed with a fire stop coating.

    As you were.

    Dave.
    Oh...it looked like you were trying to push proper English on me.

    There aren't too many houses that use steel beams...maybe it it's some HUGE mansion with massive roofs and spaces.
    You can find metal studs in use...but they're just like rolled metal, and while they are fireproof compared to wooden studs, they are not as strong and are often not used on load-bearing walls....though there may be different grades, and some that can be.

    Anyway...at this point, my whole house is framed with wood, and with the studio build, the existing roof and the two walls that will remain are out all wood...so no point in switching to metal.

  8. #78
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    Oh I see, well if the house is all wood as is I can see your point.

    Over here though I doubt you would be allowed a timber beam in a load bearing situation even if the rest of the place was trees. Building regs'. Things improve and have to be at current spec, for instance you would have to upgrade electrics to PVC not "new" rubber!

    I was in any case talking of small dwellings in the main, making two rooms a single at 25-30feet. There is also the fact that for the same load bearing capacity a wooden beam would be of much greater cross section and probably more expensive!

    Then of course, you have a lot more trees than us.

    Dave.

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    Dave - here in the US, they now use composite wooden (!) I-beams for long long-load-bearing applications.
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  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    I would think though that even without the basements, they still need to have a slab/foundation that is able to withstand that, so I would think they could also engineer basements too...but it's probably not worth the extra $$$.


    Quite right, foundation repair is big business down here . The older houses are all eleveated/no slabs, just footings. Lots of companies that level the old ones too.

    The slab for my house (built in 2008) would impress you. First they peeled away ~2 feet of the gumbo/original soil. Then topped that with about 4 feet of a sand/soil mix. Then they proceeded to dig 5 foot deep 2 foot wide channels creating 6x6 squares. Forms were then built around the outside, pipes for sewage were placed and 1 inch steel cables were stretched through the forms front to rear and side to side. Then cement was poured over the whole creating approx. 28 upside down interconnected "boxes" of reinforced concrete. The ends of the cables had threads and nuts were installed and tightened during the curing process to increase overall rigidity. A good storm may blow my house down, but that slab ain't goin' nowhere!
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