Page 16 of 20 FirstFirst ... 6 14 15 16 17 18 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 193

Thread: New studio space...considering my options.

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,743
    Thanks
    303
    Thanked 874 Times in 763 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470743
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Quote Originally Posted by Ponder5 View Post
    Since you're building from the ground-up, did you consider hydronic heating?

    No, i'm not a commercial - just thought it'd be a great idea for a studio.
    It's not completely from the ground up...it's an extension/addition to an existing space...so there's no way to run piping throughout the whole floor.
    Also, it's going to be a thick floor...double 1/2" ply on a 2'x4' frame on the flat, and then underlayment and 3/4" hardwood...so not a situation where I would want the heat in the floor.
    Additionally...the A/C will be a mini-split w/heat pump...and then I'm going to also add hot water baseboard along one wall, tied into my existing furnace as a 3rd zone. That way I'll have the heat pump for mild-cold days...and the baseboard for the dead of winter cold days.

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    on the lam
    Posts
    242
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Rep Power
    187319
    I'm getting a greater appreciation for hardwood floor since I started tearing up the wall to wall carpeting my parents put in 40 plus years ago. Hey, it was the '70s, it was the fashion at the time. At least we never had shag carpet although I did campaign for it but was denied. Thankfully.

  3. #153
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,743
    Thanks
    303
    Thanked 874 Times in 763 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470743
    Nothing to update other than to say...I'm still waiting.

    My other house facelift projects are ongoing...but my studio project has yet to break ground because we are waiting on the town to give us the permit.
    The Building Department is waiting on the lawyer for the ZBA to provide the official letter that my variance was approved...and he's apparently waiting on someone to transcribe the minutes of the ZBA public hearing session where they verbally approved my variance.
    Don't you just love small-town government!?

    They were ALL there at that ZBA session....the lawyer, the Building Department, the ZBA people who voted to approve the variance...and me...but the formality of the official letter is now holding up the issuance of the permit!

    My contractor just laughs about it all and tells me to be patient. I tell him it's been 5 months since we first started...how much more patient can I be.
    That said...he has confirmed that even with a mid-late October start, he will be able to get the foundation in, frame and seal it before we get into the colder winter...and then after that it's all inside work.


    Apart form that...with all this time to think...I've been wondering about the floor for the studio. Having gotten the hardwood floor installed in my house on the entire top floor...it's beautiful, and I can imagine how it would look in a single, huge room like my studio will be....but I also wonder if it will hold up in a studio setting?
    I see a lot of studios with similar hardwood flooring...so I guess it is what is...over time, the small dings and nicks will happen, and that's how it goes...but I was thinking if there was some alternative that was going to be much more durable, especially to things like mic stands, drums and heavier gear getting moved about...but also something that would be as appealing as the hardwood flooring...?
    I don't want a polished cement floor, no matter how pretty it can be made...it's just too...industrial or shopping mall looking. Then there's either the vinyl products, the stuff that looks like fake wood, which I'm not crazy about...or the old-school linoleum tile. I can't think of anything else.
    TBH...I've seen some studios with the old-school linoleum...in a balck-n-white checkered pattern...and does look nice. Very '50s R&R...but it would be pretty cold going down on the cement slab.

    I dunno...I'll probably stay with the hardwood floor plan...and then just do the "oriental throw rugs" like every other studio does when they set up gear.

  4. #154
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Niagara Region Canada
    Age
    53
    Posts
    169
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
    Rep Power
    37538
    What's the reclaimed wood/lumber industry like in the area?

    G

  5. #155
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    northampton uk home of Dr Who and Blackstar Amps!
    Posts
    10,022
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 672 Times in 636 Posts
    Rep Power
    9374895
    I have read more than once Miroslav that drum kits sound better setup on a "diaz" a plinth made of 3/4 ply and timber about 6-8" high?

    The top can be covered with HD carpet tiles and the underside with tough rubber. Heck! you could incorporate wind down castors!

    And, me being me, I would install floor boxes for mic XLRs and heaphone jacks on top. These could output at the rear and keep cable rats nests to a minimum.
    All my (3!) mic stands have PVC caps on their legs.

    Dave.

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,743
    Thanks
    303
    Thanked 874 Times in 763 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470743
    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch View Post
    What's the reclaimed wood/lumber industry like in the area?

    G
    This being NY State, and the Hudson Valley area here being close to NYC/NJ metro area...everything old and beat up is "chic" and hipster retro cool...so antiques and reclaimed wood fetch a high price.

    I was checking out the availability of large beams from old barns, etc...that I could use across the top of the walls as supplemental collar ties for the roof, and for some esthetic purpose. I found an entire industry to reclaimed wood. It would be very expensive to get (4) 25' 6"x6" or 8"x8" barn beams...but they have them, for sure.
    So I'm going with basic 2"x 8" doubled pine beams, and then I will just cap them all the way around with some cheap pine planks that I can either stain, paint or apply one of the several "aging" treatments that are on the market (the price of reclaimed wood created a new need, and new products)...though there are also some "homegrown" methods for aging the wood...but I think it will be too much of a mess, and I'll just stain it. I may try one it on one plank and see how it comes out...I just don't need to spend time on that.

    Quote Originally Posted by ecc83 View Post
    I have read more than once Miroslav that drum kits sound better setup on a "diaz" a plinth made of 3/4 ply and timber about 6-8" high?

    The top can be covered with HD carpet tiles and the underside with tough rubber. Heck! you could incorporate wind down castors!

    And, me being me, I would install floor boxes for mic XLRs and heaphone jacks on top. These could output at the rear and keep cable rats nests to a minimum.
    All my (3!) mic stands have PVC caps on their legs.

    Dave.
    Yeah, I could do a drum riser...but I don't think I will bother with that.
    AFA floor plates...if go with the hardwood, I decided I didn't want to have plates in the floor that if ever removed would leave holes that needed to be patched.
    I'm going to go the long way and run some cable through the walls, and put plates in a couple of spots on them...and the rest will be just dropped cable.
    I mean...a simple 16-channel snake box is a single cable, not a rat's nest...and it's easy to place where you need it, rather than relying on wall/floor plates, and then you still have to run cables from them.

    This is mainly *my* studio space...so I don't need to approach some of this stuff as though there will be daily sessions coming and going, and I have to cover all possibilities and angles.
    Yeah, the hardwood floor will require a bit more care during use...but it will look like a million bucks in a huge, open space room.

  7. #157
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    HOUSTON, TEXAS
    Posts
    898
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked 150 Times in 133 Posts
    Rep Power
    798998
    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    This being NY State, ...Yeah, the hardwood floor will require a bit more care during use...but it will look like a million bucks in a huge, open space room.
    Just curious here, are you planning on doing parquet or basketball court style flooring? And i was curious also if you looked into any of the "renewable" flooring wood options like bamboo?
    Win 7 Ult Dell i7 4core 6700ghz 32 GB, 1,2x2, 4 Tb Barracuda HD's running Pro tools 2019 through Allen&Heath Qu-32

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,743
    Thanks
    303
    Thanked 874 Times in 763 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470743
    Quote Originally Posted by Gtoboy View Post
    Just curious here, are you planning on doing parquet or basketball court style flooring? And i was curious also if you looked into any of the "renewable" flooring wood options like bamboo?
    By parquet, I assume you mean the 12" squares of small wood strips, etc...?
    No...not parquet.

    How do you "basketball court style"...? I always told my contractor that I wanted it to be as solid as a pro basketball court, but that was more about the sub-floor installation.
    It's a typical hardwood floor installation...not sure how that compares to basketball court flooring. These are 3.25" strips that come in various lengths, from 12" up to 6'-7' long...tongue-n-groove, 3/4" thick solid wood, which is the floor I just installed in my main house floor (LR, DR, KIT, BTH) and it is Brazillian Cherry.
    Technically "exotic" wood, but AFAIK, it is renewable, though I doubt as fast as bamboo. It's a natural colored wood, that is not stained, but it comes in a variety of cherry/brown/blond colors and also a variety of grains. It is almost 3X harder than your standard oak flooring.

    So that's what I am planning to put in the studio also. It will be on a cement slab, then 2"x4" on the flat frame, 16" on center, so really only like 12" spaces between the boards. There will be solid insulation of some type in the spaces between the boards. Then 3/4" sub-floor on top...and then the 3/4" hardwood floor.
    I will most likely glue the 2"x4" frame to the slab, using the same glue they use for gluing hardwood floor...it's dries to a rubbery consistency, but once it dries, it's not going to let go...so that will help also decouple the wood framing from the slab somewhat, and/or at least dampen any transmission to the slab,

    Oh...there will also be some kind of thick poly between the slab and frame to act as a moisture barrier...I'm just not sure how to put it down and then also glue the wood frame. I will probably just cut some slits in the poly for the glue down the middle of the boards. We did that with the rubberized underlayment that was used in the hardwood installation that we already did...in spots where you couldn't get the floor nail gun in place because of the walls or what have you, that way we avoided face-nailing the flooring as much as possible, and just cut some slits in the underlayment and glued the hardwood right to the subfloor, but left enough underlayment to maintain the level and the "seal"....if that makes any sense.

    Yeah...as quick as I started thinking about something other than a hardwood floor for the studio...I quickly put those thoughts aside. I want the hardwood floor, it will be quite spectacular if I may say so myself...and I'm going to just get a bunch of smaller rugs for under the amps, the drums, the racks...and a few on the side for when needed. Some smaller 6' x 4' rugs...and a couple of bigger ones...and that should look nice and also save the floor.

    My other thoughts are now about the walls. Since I'm doing the RSIC clips on the studs, and then running hat-channel through them for the two layers of drywall...I need to find out how much weight the clips/hat channel will support, so I have some idea what I can add on the walls/ceiling as treatment without overburdening the clips & drywall installation. Apparently with the staggered clip layout and the 4-5 horizontal rows of hat channel per 8' height of wall...they can support quite a lot of weight per sq inch...but I want to be sure. I would like to have some bigger panels in the walls that are maybe hinged, with hard surface on one side, absorbent on the other...that way I can change the sound of the room.

    Of course...this is all just shit running through my head at this point...and when we get down to it, and I have the finished room and actually start laying things out and considering what will both work well and look good...I may end up with something totally different for inside treatment...and I hope not to have to do a lot of it. I'll have to try and get the decay as good as possible with a slight wet vibe, but without flutter. Just that nice sound, like when you talk in the middle of the room, and your voice really fills it without echo or weird acoustic interactions from the walls/ceiling.
    I want to optimize for mixing/listening...which I think will allow also for a pretty good tracking environment. Add some gobos, etc...some heavy curtains for the 4 windows that can be opened or closed. It should be pretty good...so far I'm not seeing any substantial issues...and worst case, I add a bit more treatment than expected.
    Last edited by miroslav; 3 Weeks Ago at 19:36.

  9. #159
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Trending
    Posts
    18,743
    Thanks
    303
    Thanked 874 Times in 763 Posts
    Rep Power
    21470743
    Small update...but a major one.
    Today I'm finally getting the official permit from the town!
    Boy...I was really starting to worry this thing was going to drag out too long into cold weather...the town took 6 weeks just to get the official variance letter (formality) from their lawyer before they would issue the permit...but it's all good now...we are still within the planned build window.

    I think my contractor should be here sometime next week to start the project.

  10. #160
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    50
    Posts
    19,585
    Thanks
    990
    Thanked 729 Times in 653 Posts
    Rep Power
    21474864
    Quote Originally Posted by miroslav View Post
    Small update...but a major one.
    Today I'm finally getting the official permit from the town!
    Boy...I was really starting to worry this thing was going to drag out too long into cold weather...the town took 6 weeks just to get the official variance letter (formality) from their lawyer before they would issue the permit...but it's all good now...we are still within the planned build window.

    I think my contractor should be here sometime next week to start the project.
    Awesome! Hope that contractor is honest!
    PC Win7-64-24G i7-4790k/Cubase 9 Pro 64-bit/2-Steinberg UR824's/ADAM A7x/Event TR8/SS Trigger Plat Deluxe/Melodyne 4 Studio/Other things that don't mean anything if a client shows up not knowing what it wants.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Home studio - interface options - help required!
    By KrispyDK in forum Recording Techniques
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-19-2010, 11:09
  2. My new studio space...
    By Mindcore in forum Studio Building & Acoustic Treatment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-11-2005, 21:35
  3. Monitor Options for New Studio
    By drum bum in forum Gear Reviews & Questions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-06-2003, 23:44
  4. Flooring options for one room studio.
    By Pacifica604w in forum Studio Building & Acoustic Treatment
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-14-2003, 07:32

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •